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In retrospect it was Marcel and I now feel guilty as hell but I'm sure that I've made up for it since. Because it's a marriage of mixed religions, they all said it wouldn't last, but oh boy, how wrong they were and it didn't take long for everyone to realize what a good match it was and treat her better than ME!
Well, if you feel guilty than do something nice for her and then tell her why.
 

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At least they drive on the Right side of the road not the Wrong side of the road ! :sarcastic: :sarcastic:
Hi Richard

It's about sides, The right side to us is the wrong side..... If you get my meaning :sarcastic:

Regards

Phil
 

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Discussion Starter · #124 ·
Well guys, let us return to the original subject matter, fixed base routers against the far Superior plunge router. A very knowledgeable forum member yesterday sent me a copy of an article titled "Master the Plunge Router" by one GREGORY PAOLINI" in the Nov./Dec. issue of Fine Woodworking. The opening paragraph reads as follows:
"Because they are versatile,easy to use, and affordable, routers are extremely popular tools. And while a router with a fixed base is great, one with a plunge base is even better. Plunge routers can do everything that a fixed base type does,plus they can plunge into and out of cuts, so you can also tackle mortice's and stopped dadoes. They're better for template routing too." End of quote. Now I don't know this gentleman from a bar of soap so I did a google search and found this: Gregory Paolini - Fine Woodworking Profile
I'm sure that you will have to agree that this AMERICAN man is a VERY experienced craftsman, yet he is saying what I have been saying on this forum for years. Perhaps now American manufacturers will bring America into the 21st century where routers are concerned. I rest my case.
 

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I agree that plunge routers are better than fixed base routers but I do not want another restriction placed in my life by a government regulation. I will decide what's best for me.
 

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Harry, stop beating the dead horse. Bob and Rick praised the virtues of big plunge routers for many years. Things have changed in the last 20 years. One prime example is the depth of plunge. The Bosch MR23 plunge base has a full 3"(75 mm) plunge. The fixed base is designed to be used in the table and it has an excellent height adjuster. One motor with two bases = lower cost. You have spent a great deal of time praising plunge routers and have yet to try one of these combo kits. People who have used them prefer them. It's just that simple. Let it go. Don't make me call you Tom!
 

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I agree that plunge routers are better than fixed base routers but I do not want another restriction placed in my life by a government regulation. I will decide what's best for me.
My thoughts exactly, Marcel. I also agree that plunge routers have a valuable place in the shop, and can do things that fixed base rouers cannot. But we have a choice of routers, and we should have the freedom to choose what works best for us. Government's purpose is to protect our freedoms, not limit them unnecessarily.
 

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Did you notice what brand he was playing with, Harry.......LOL

No wonder you approved of the article......

Must read and digest...
 

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Did you notice what brand he was playing with, Harry.......LOL

No wonder you approved of the article......

Must read and digest...
Hey James, there were also mentions for Bosch AND deWalt (my hobby-horse :thank_you2:)

Regards

Phil
 

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Discussion Starter · #131 · (Edited)
Harry, stop beating the dead horse. Bob and Rick praised the virtues of big plunge routers for many years. Things have changed in the last 20 years. One prime example is the depth of plunge. The Bosch MR23 plunge base has a full 3"(75 mm) plunge. The fixed base is designed to be used in the table and it has an excellent height adjuster. One motor with two bases = lower cost. You have spent a great deal of time praising plunge routers and have yet to try one of these combo kits. People who have used them prefer them. It's just that simple. Let it go. Don't make me call you Tom!
People who bought a model T ford preferred it to a penny farthing Mike.
Perhaps this is where I should post this link to another AMERICAN professional woodworker.
https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B13jQxW5N_l9cUc5WkpybTR3TTA
By the way Mike it's far from a dead horse, members really are getting the message and will one day thank the likes of me for drawing their attention to the many benefits of PLUNGE routers.
If anything Mike it's people like yourself who are attempting to flog a dead horse, be patient my friend, you are young enough to see the change to PLUNGE routers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #132 ·
I agree that plunge routers are better than fixed base routers but I do not want another restriction placed in my life by a government regulation. I will decide what's best for me.
Marcel, that part of my post really was tongue in cheek, intended to keep up the interest in the thread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #133 ·
My thoughts exactly, Marcel. I also agree that plunge routers have a valuable place in the shop, and can do things that fixed base rouers cannot. But we have a choice of routers, and we should have the freedom to choose what works best for us. Government's purpose is to protect our freedoms, not limit them unnecessarily.
Chris, please read my reply to Marcel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #134 ·
If I need a very sturdy plunge machine, I mount the wood in my milling machine!

Problem solved.:thank_you2:
Does it really rotate fast enough for clean cuts in wood Harrison, mine doesn't.
 

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Discussion Starter · #135 ·
Did you notice what brand he was playing with, Harry.......LOL

No wonder you approved of the article......

Must read and digest...
You betcha I did but whilst I'm on record as being a great Makita fan, I've never suggested that there aren't other good brands of PLUNGE routers out there, many of which were in the reviews. The chances are that if my job was building patios from lumber, I would actually prefer a D handle router for putting a bevel on the corners of all the rough sawn lumber where once the bit is set it would never need adjustment until it was ready for replacement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #136 ·
Gentlemen and of course ladies, it's been brought to my attention that members are upset that this thread is still active and that I should end it. Please advise me if this is what you want.
 

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Gentlemen and of course ladies, it's been brought to my attention that members are upset that this thread is still active and that I should end it. Please advise me if this is what you want.
Harry,

I enjoy reading all the threads that you start, as long as you are getting replies, keep the threads running. :sold:
 

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Gentlemen and of course ladies, it's been brought to my attention that members are upset that this thread is still active and that I should end it. Please advise me if this is what you want.
1+ for keep it going. If I should become upset with this thread then I just won"t read it any more.

Al
 

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Of course it's what we want, it never should have been allowed to go as long as it did, could have been an interesting topic of router style preferences without the feeble minded country bashing. Bust as I said before, while it was a silly thread, it was an interesting read and could have been pretty cool if it had been done in a collaborative way whereby members would want to sincerely reply.

Learn from your mistake and carry on solider.
 

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Things have changed in the last 20 years. One prime example is the depth of plunge. The Bosch MR23 plunge base has a full 3"(75 mm) plunge.

You have spent a great deal of time praising plunge routers and have yet to try one of these combo kits. People who have used them prefer them. It's just that simple.
Hi Mike

The only thing I can say to that is, no, it isn't. A typical 1/2in full-size plunge router these days has an input rating of 2000 to 2200 watts (I'll use watts because they are much more accurate than American sales power ratings). That encompasses routers from Festool, Makita, Hitachi, deWalt, Bosch, Ryobi and Triton amongst others. The maximum power input on combo kits is around 1600 watts, often much less. Where this becomes significant is in the very jobs at which plungers excel, such as deep mortising, deep template work, etc. It also gives enough power to work with materials like Corian, Gibralter, etc which lower power routers struggle with - believe me even a difference of 400 watts makes a considerable differemce in useability. Finally the extra power makes heavy single pass work, like heavy edge rebating (edge dados?), staircase housings, etc feasible with all that brings in terms of speed and accuracy. You can achieve most (but not all) of this with a combo kit, but not as quickly. That makes a trim carpenter or shop fitter or production worker who's in the know favour the true heavy plunger. The same person is less likely to need a massive 3in hole in the bottom because cutters like that are used for panel raising, a job better done on a spindle moulder (shaper). When you do need to do that sort of work on a router table the need to pull the cutter into the base of the router really isn't that great if you install a collet extender on the router and mount the router to table using a sub-base. But even there the extra power of the heavy plunge brings benefits in the ability to raise a panel in 1- or 2- passes less than the smaller router could do it in

Years back (2001) even the Journal of Light Construction was singing the praises of plunge routers. So I think that Harry is right to point out that different can be better

Or different strokes for different folks?

Regards

Phil
 
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