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I realise that BUT, this is a forum for mainly beginners, at least it was for many years, who would love to see how YOU, a
professional actually makes things. Is that too much to ask?
 

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Steve
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1,679 Posts
If we've finished having a pi**ing contest now, can we get back to woodworking?
Guys, it doesn't matter who was on when and what was shared when or not shared when. Can we agree we're here because we have a passion for woodworking, more specifically with routers, and that we want to share our experiences with others?
Because that to me is what this forum is about. Yes, we like pretty pictures of the things we can do, so we can aspire to doing them, and yes, instructions are awesome for newbies like me who are still trying to find our way. Both of these are important and should be shared, otherwise those coming up that want to learn don't get the inspiration or instruction they need to understand our craft.
But bickering on here does nothing to support anyone and just turns those of us who need this site off.
A site to help learners out needs both professional and hobby woodworkers, as both have experience to share. I get little enough time for woodworking as it is without wading through disagreements.
 

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321 Posts
Getting back to the original post.
My approach has always been, SAFETY FIRST! What is the safest way to route this piece. Then I look at which way would be better to: control, yield the best results, avoiding (tear out, burning, etc.) which method is more practical for me, hand held or table. Then I look at the set-ups that I have at my disposal. Sometimes I have to do it with the help of supports, jigs, fixtures. Each task requires thinking, and planning. Sometimes I will do it in a way that I am more comfortable with, and it takes me longer to do.
My point is, we all have different shop sizes, tooling, and preferences that we use when routing out project pieces. I have done specific routing using the handheld method, and the router table to accomplish the same end results, I.e. dovetails. A lot depends on which method I use. Small pieces (drawer sides) I typically use the router table. If I have longer pieces, then the handheld method works better. It can be done either way. It is a personal preference on which way we chose.
What is very helpful is presenting these basic and elaborate methods to us all. that way we can have options.
As I have stated here so many times, "I love options".
I want to thank everyone for their continued sincere, detailed contributions to this forum.

Ellery Becnel
 

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Retired since June 2000
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Here is a repeat of an early project. The photos are poor, but it was a long time ago, my granddaughter now has two lively girls.
 

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Retired Engineer, Hobby woodworker
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I started this in response to an old string started in 2012 by Harry which was recently reactivated but I decided to just start a new string. Opinions are still coming in so I'll throw my 2 cents worth in. Isn't it interesting that people throw their 2 cents worth in but others are only willing to give a penny for your thoughts? But I digress. I won't touch on the metric topic but will say that an inch is an inch no matter what you call it. I have three routers, two are plunge 3 1/2 hp which are way to heavy to use by hand, and one smaller fixed base one that I haven't used in about 3 years. The plunge routers are mounted on plates to use in a table and the springs are removed. So I guess that tells the world that I don't have much use for the plunge feature. As for guide bushings, the ones that I got with the router have never been used. If I need to make something like a curved edge I make a template and use a pattern bit which by the way doesn't require accounting for an offset calculation which can easily cause a mistake. The bigger question that I raise all the time is why does one use a router not mounted in a table? A handheld router certainly isn't as safe, accurate, or easy as a table-mounted when doing edges or doing grooves which is what a router is made for. I know the argument that you can't do mortises with a table-mounted router. Okay, how many mortises does the average person make? More than one a day? a week? A month? If your work requires mortises then buy a mortising machine. Do you make hinge cutouts? If so the buy a small 1/4" router and the correct setup. Do you make carved-out things like bowls? Then buy a lathe. I'll give you this you can't make signs with a table-mounted router. How many out there have ever used a wrench to drive a nail? It sounds crazy because a wrench is not the best tool to use although it does work. How about a screwdriver as a chisel? You see the questions on the form all the time. Can I use a router to cut a board. ( yes but use a table saw) How do I make a dado for a shelf (use a table saw) how do I make a series of holes 2" in diameter (use a hole saw) How do I make dowels (buy them) the list goes on. I have zero use for a handheld router and I use the router almost once a week. I can't imagine that the type of work I do is much different than the average person does yet I get by without ever having to take the router off the table.
Couldn't agree more. I made my router and router lift. I feel so much more in control and save using the table.
 
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