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No Tom.
I only have those 3 bushes.
There are times when different size bushes might be useful but the ones I have suit me.
Jig following is the only reason I use bushes for and the jigs I have made are for the 30mm bush.
As all accessories in Europe are metric and many of my cutters are in inches, it can take some time calculating the difference between cutter and bush.
I therefore make a jig for a particular cut using a known cutter size.
Anything bigger than my normal use and I would use a straight edge guide offset from the router base.
I'd never use large diameter cutters hand held.
I'd use the router in a table.
I am waiting to get a 1/2" router before using any large bits.
At present I raise door panels on the table saw but would prefer the finish of a panel raising bit.
It's not safe running a panel against a fence set at 45° to the blade and raising the blade a little for each pass and the finish needs a lot of sanding with my ROS.
As soon as I am able I will be rebuilding the workshop to take account of the tools I have and new ones I intend getting.
I cant do this until I build a shed to take all the garden tools, mowers, shredder etc as they take up too much space in the workshop (garage)
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Dewy said:
No Tom.
I only have those 3 bushes.
There are times when different size bushes might be useful but the ones I have suit me.
Jig following is the only reason I use bushes for and the jigs I have made are for the 30mm bush.
As all accessories in Europe are metric and many of my cutters are in inches, it can take some time calculating the difference between cutter and bush.
I therefore make a jig for a particular cut using a known cutter size.
Anything bigger than my normal use and I would use a straight edge guide offset from the router base.
I'd never use large diameter cutters hand held.
I'd use the router in a table.
I am waiting to get a 1/2" router before using any large bits.
At present I raise door panels on the table saw but would prefer the finish of a panel raising bit.
It's not safe running a panel against a fence set at 45° to the blade and raising the blade a little for each pass and the finish needs a lot of sanding with my ROS.
As soon as I am able I will be rebuilding the workshop to take account of the tools I have and new ones I intend getting.
I cant do this until I build a shed to take all the garden tools, mowers, shredder etc as they take up too much space in the workshop (garage)
Jig following is the only reason I use bushes for and the jigs I have made are for the 30mm bush.

Are we talking Male or female Jigs?

Anything bigger than my normal use and I would use a straight edge guide offset from the router base.

What happens if the item is not straight?

I am waiting to get a 1/2" router before using any large bits.

I do not use large 1/4" large diameter cutters.

It's not safe running a panel against a fence set at 45° to the blade and raising the blade a little for each pass and the finish needs a lot of sanding with my ROS.

I certainly would not run a panel as suggested above as you say it is not safe. 90% my routing is conducted in the plunge mode which I consider is safe So safe that I teach Blind people to use the router.

There are times when different size bushes might be useful but the ones I have suit me.

You will be surprised what you can do with a greater variety of template guides. Have you had a look at my home page to see what I mean?
Tom
 

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I make all my own template guides Tom.
I prefer not to see others guides as I have spent all my working life as a toolmaker and find some of the jigs I design and make are easier to use and a lot simpler than most others.
I've been making woodworking jigs since 1988 when I made them during lunch breaks using the engineering machines.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I recently went to one of our colleges here in the West and posted a problem (not really a problem) I asked the staff teaching woodwork how they would go about producing a shield which is a common item that could be made by the students and made as a presentation.
I asked what tools and machinery would be required and the processes required to complete the project.
With your permission I would be interested on how the average woodworker would go about this problem. I am prepared to leave this for a week and maybe we can learn from each other passing on hints and tips etc. then I will put up my answer as to how I completed the project. I am interested on how the average woodworker would complete the shield.
I will produce a drawing for all to see.
Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 · (Edited)
template tom said:
I recently went to one of our colleges here in the West and posted a problem (not really a problem) I asked the staff teaching woodwork how they would go about producing a shield which is a common item that could be made by the students and made as a presentation.
I asked what tools and machinery would be required and the processes required to complete the project.
With your permission I would be interested on how the average woodworker would go about this problem. I am prepared to leave this for a week and maybe we can learn from each other passing on hints and tips etc. then I will put up my answer as to how I completed the project. I am interested on how the average woodworker would complete the shield.
I will produce a drawing for all to see.
Tom
Here is pic of shield I presented to the staff. Rounding over bit used for the edge treatment.
Tom
 

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The way I would go about making the shield is to make a full sized pattern from 1/4" Masonite (tempered hardboard) and attach it to the back of the shield with double sided carpet tape. Then I would rough cut the shape with my cordless Makita sabresaw. To get the finished shape I would clamp the wood to the edge of my worktable and using a round over bit with a guide bearing follow the pattern.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Thanks Mike for your reply. I would suggest that is how 90% of woodworkers would do the job and I was one of them some years ago. I have since developed this method where the template guides are used, not to make the shield larger by working your way round with a straight cutter.

With the process I have developed I would set up my material in a Jig Holder (Simple frame 400 x 300 x 40mm, constructed from 19mm Material) Instead of preparing a template (Male) I prepare a Female template. The material is secured in the frame with say three small screws from the back, then I insert my template (May require 2 Templates) and with the aid of a template guide and an extending rounding over cutter (Carb-I-Tool cutter) I would rout a couple of sides of the shield the reverse the template to rout the other two Sides. When the material is removed from the Jig Holder the shield is complete,
Tom
 

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template tom said:
I recently went to one of our colleges here in the West and posted a problem (not really a problem) I asked the staff teaching woodwork how they would go about producing a shield which is a common item that could be made by the students and made as a presentation.
I asked what tools and machinery would be required and the processes required to complete the project.
With your permission I would be interested on how the average woodworker would go about this problem. I am prepared to leave this for a week and maybe we can learn from each other passing on hints and tips etc. then I will put up my answer as to how I completed the project. I am interested on how the average woodworker would complete the shield.
I will produce a drawing for all to see.
Tom
How many of these are we making? Can I use a plunge round over router bit and a guide? I would assume we are cutting 4 or 5 - 8 X 8 shields and I can use the plunge round over router bit with a guide.

1) I would make a fixture that has 2 sticks running parallel 10" apart down the internal shield pattern. These sticks will run with the grain of the finished shield.

2) Using a 1 X 10 X 5 or 6 feet long slide your fixture on the 1 x 10 and mount it with nails into the edge of the board.

3) Mount your guide and set the depth of cut with the plunge round over bit. Set the depth so it doesn’t cut right through by about 1/16". Cut the first shield then remove the nails and move the fixture down the 1 X 10 to the next position fasten then cut. Move and cut until you have cut all of the shields

4) Using your planer flip the 1 X 10 on the back side and plane off the 1/16" If your careful when routing, your planer will release each of the shields as it removes the 1/16"and in the same board make shield frames from the external routing. Now you have the shields and shield frames all rounded over and ready to use.

That is how I would do it...
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 · (Edited)
Yes we should be making a few.
No matter what method we adopt we will require to make a template of some sort. Usually a male template and in some instances there is no guarantee that both sides will be cut the same shape unless a single sided template is produced first then used as a pattern to rout them the same using a trimming cutter. Cutting Female templates the sides will be cut with the router exactly the same shield after shield.

I think I follow your method. Just one question. Are you using a 'Female Template' or a 'Male Template'? Drawings or sketches would help.

Would this leave one of your projects 'Shield' or 'Frame' with rounded corners?

Yes I agree not to cut all the way through as you suggested Instead of putting material through a thicknesser I used to use the trimming cutter to remove the 1/16" left on.

I now screw from the back of the Jig holding the material the I can rout all the way through.

Tom
 
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