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Discussion Starter #21
Thanks Tom. You've made it perfectly clear.

I have used the one labeled "case miters". We were building a set of casework for a jewelry store. some of the cases were 6 feet by 2 feet by 3 feet high with drawers one long face. This included an 8 inch high glass and aluminum showcase at the top. The lower part was glued up 3/4 solid oak boards. I used the splines to line up the corners for gluing. I had built a large fixture to hold the side panels at a 45 and then used my router to cut the spline groves. Your method would have been much simpler as I already had a nice factory built sliding table on my Powermatic table saw which had a left tilting blade.

I had been experimenting with concealed splines in raised panel door frames which I cut using a modified large diameter router bit. I made circular splines and glued them inside the corner joints. They made a strong joint and aligned the surfaces. This was probably after I'd heard about the Lomello ($500) machine.

We finally did purchase a Lomello biscuit machine before starting the auto dealership reception area made from that ugly oak "slotwall", shown in the photos(1988).

Art

View attachment 397776 View attachment 397777
Here is my first "patent applied" for invention. I had been building lots of raised panel doors and face frames using the wooden, hand dowelling jig shown above when I had this idea. I hired a machinist friend to make it for me and it worked great. I applied for a patent, but had no luck with that one. It would have taken more time and money than I was prepared to expend at the time. I think it was about 1985. We used the heck out of it until we eventually began buying most of our raised panel doors from a high quality door manufacturer. Easier to estimate door costs.

By 1988 we had switched almost entirely to frameless cabinets. The volume of cabinets needed for our commercial (medical and dental) clients would have required more doors than we could have produced.

You've got to see this thing in action. I'll have to upload the vids to You tube and add a link here, ? tomorrow. Now I have to get back to building my RC airplane with 10 foot wingspan.

397852
 

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93 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
Here is my first "patent applied" for invention. I had been building lots of raised panel doors and face frames using the wooden, hand dowelling jig shown above when I had this idea. I hired a machinist friend to make it for me and it worked great. I applied for a patent, but had no luck with that one. It would have taken more time and money than I was prepared to expend at the time. I think it was about 1985. We used the heck out of it until we eventually began buying most of our raised panel doors from a high quality door manufacturer. Easier to estimate door costs.

By 1988 we had switched almost entirely to frameless cabinets. The volume of cabinets needed for our commercial (medical and dental) clients would have required more doors than we could have produced.

You've got to see this thing in action. I'll have to upload the vids to You tube and add a link here, ? tomorrow. Now I have to get back to building my RC airplane with 10 foot wingspan.

View attachment 397852 C
With my fabulous internet here in central Wisconsin, it took exactly 8 hours to load these three short vids, totaling about 5 minutes run time. Take a look. It shows set up for thickness and width before drilling a small frame as for a door etc.

DOWEL DRILLING 1.MOV

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1tglDWOFxtzGGBHNLTmRCeif_mWno8hkH/view?usp=sharing

DOWEL DRILLING 3.MOV

Art Schmitt
 
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