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A big hello from Stoneleigh in Surrey, England to everybody out there.
I am a complete newbie to Routing. Having just been bought one as a present by my Girls..
1st question
What would be the best bits to buy to start with
The router takes 1/4 inch bits by the way.
Thanks
 

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A big hello from Stoneleigh in Surrey, England to everybody out there.
I am a complete newbie to Routing. Having just been bought one as a present by my Girls..
1st question
What would be the best bits to buy to start with
The router takes 1/4 inch bits by the way.
Thanks
N/A, welcome to the forum, you might check that bit size, it might be a 6mm shank.
Just saying,
Herb
 

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Greetings. Glad you decided to join the fun. Refuge from an all female family is one of the benefits of woodworking. Please fill in your informaiton, it is helpful on occasion to know what tools you have when responding to a question.
 

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David
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Welcome to the forum! When you get a minute complete your profile with first name to remove the N/a in the left panel.

So what's your first project? Something the girls want? :wink:

David
 

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Welcome to the forum.
 

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@ thewalrus50,Hi Wal,welcome to the Router Forum.This is the best forum you will find so don't be afraid to ask questions. Double check the bit size, I/4",& buy bits with carbide tipped teeth which last longer than cheap steel. Also buy bits to suit the job you're doing otherwise you will have bits you may never use.Cheers from the south coast of New South Wales. James jj777746
 

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Welcome Walrus. As others have mentioned, you should get carbide tip gifts instead of high-speed steel bits. While there are sets with a huge number of bits, you can get by for most projects with a basic set. If you buy a set of bets with 30, 40 or 100 bits in the set, you will find out that years from now many of them were never used. You would likely want to get at least a straight trim bit, and Ogee bit, a chamfer bit, a flush trim bit, a slot cutter bit, a rabbet bit and a round over bit. Many companies sell sets of bits, and Bosch has a six piece set of 1/4" bits and Yonico has a 15 bit set of bits. Although both are carbon tipped, the Bosch bits are about 2 or 3 times more expensive; there are also sets much less expensive. There is a reason why. However, you may wish to start with a less-expensive set to see how the bits perform and what they will do for you. It just seems to me that if you got a smaller set of Bosch bets – or Freud, Whiteside, Amana Summerfield, etc -- They would probably last much longer and be the types of bets that you would use much more often.

The initial set of bits you get will likely include one or more of the following bits: a round over, a straight bit, a rabbet bit, a flush trim bit, a chamfer bit, an Ogee bit, and a corebox bit.

Do yourself a favor and read the articles that Stick has posted, especially the ones related to safety. Besides the obvious need to wear quality safety glasses, you'll want to pay attention to the articles about router speed and direction of travel when cutting. These Articles are an excellent place to start and as you progress, you will find yourself referring to them from time to time. There are a couple of articles about bits and profiles. They can show you what can be done with some basic bits.
 

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Lots of good advice on bits already. I think a safe bet is getting a small set of roundover bits. 1/4, 1/2 and 3/4 sizes. These are for rounding over the sharp edges of wood for a more finished look. I have and like this set of roundover bits.
Auto part Tool accessory

If you are going to put this in a table (safer and very useful), you are likely to need a bottom bearing trim bit. You'll use it to hollow out the opening for a plate to mount the router on. Lots of guides on the site on how to make a table. Here's what that bit looks likel
Tool accessory Tool Cylinder

For the most part I agree with the other folks. Forget sets. Buy what you need for each product. I have a strong preference for Freud because they're good quality and last. For fancy door and panel construction, I use Sommerfeld bit sets. In fact, you will find Marc Sommerfeld videos on using his bits to make things on a router table. He's an old cabinet maker and his methods are really worth watching on YouTube. I learned a lot watching his videos, in fact, I bought DVDs of all of them and review the ones that apply to new projects.
 
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