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Which way is the true an proper way? The thin cut next to the guide or on the opposite side? I've seen and have done this both ways, to make this short, I hate thin cuts. However, once in awhile, one needs to make them.

Ken
 

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Ken I was making blanks the other day for turning and I was getting thin cuts on my last cut from some 2" stock. I had the the thicker portion against the fence and let the thin strip that was left over on the left of the blade. This way you don't have to worry to much about kick back that way because depending how thin you are making the dogs on the blade gaurd might not be holding them in place so it would asking for trouble.
 

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Hamlin said:
Which way is the true an proper way? The thin cut next to the guide or on the opposite side? I've seen and have done this both ways, to make this short, I hate thin cuts. However, once in awhile, one needs to make them.

Ken
Either side should be fine if the blade is parallel to the fence, you are not trapping the stock or cut-off between the blade that way. The limiting factor as I see it would be the safety level with pushing stock through with the thin side nearest the rip fence. A thin enough cut and your blade guard may be in the way and not allow your push stick clearance to get to the stock.

For thin cuts, I use a spline cutting jig as shown:


Between this jig and a micro-adjust mechanism for the rip fence -- thin cuts are much less stressful. I saw this one in a recent magazine and gave it a try. Still don't have the rip-fence slide part of the jig working as freely as I'd like, but it will still work great as a spline cutting jig.

I'm not sure how thick a piece you are referring to as 'thin cuts', but a jig or sled similiar to this would seem to take care of most situations.

The above picture was taken before the jig/sled was completed, but by design it allows running stock of any length next to the sled and through the blade. As the infeed end of the stock passes the front of the sled, the hinged 'handle' will be allowed to fall into place behind the stock. A narrow cleat attached to the front of the handle piece will then 'hook' the edge of the stock being cut and will guide the stock through the blade as the entire jig/sled and stock combination is then pushed along the rip fence to complete the cut.

Cutting splines with the jig above, of a width of down to 1/16" and pretty much any length needed would be no problem (be sure and use a zero clearance throat plate).
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Many thanks.

It looks like I may have to build my own jig. I can't say that I'm too happy with my craftsman table saw at all. It's just gotten to the point to where for thin cuts, I use two fences on the band-saw. As for the size of thin cuts, the range is from 3/8 down to 1/16.

Again, many thanks.

Ken
 

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Your tablesaw itself should not be an issue, as long as the fence is parallel to the blade and the blade is sharp.

The jig above may be more than necessary, another easy one is basically a rectangular chunk of MDF with a handle of some sort -- and a cleat screwed to the end as shown below:


Something like that should be all you would need for shorter lengths of thin stock (if longer lengths are needed -- the sled above might be a better option.
 

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I think the answer is clear from the posts but I have to comment on the sled that was posted in #5. I made something like that when I needed to do a couple of hundred 1/8" x 11" pieces for a craft project. Made a pile of sawdust in no time.

I also do some "thin" cuts where the material is paper thin....... give it a try sometime it is a lot of fun doing it and impresses people who don't know how easy it is to do. (I do it for a craft project).

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Again, many thanks. I'll be building one of those sleds as my next project.

Ken
 
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