Router Forums banner

1 - 20 of 94 Posts

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've been meaning to make a thin strip ripping jig for a while now, since someone posted one they bought. I've kept all my fingers doing it the old fashioned way all these years but why push my luck when better technology is available?
This particular build is for a Unisaw which has a T slot for the miter slots. A 5/16" washer fits the T slot very well so I countersunk them for 5/16" flat head machine screws. I had a piece of birch hardwood that was about 1" thick that was a bit narrow so I decided to use 2 pieces glued together. This actually made building it easier as I cut the slots for the bolts on the table saw instead of doing it with a plunge router and once the slots were cut I glued the two halves together.

I decided it could use a little fine adjustability so I drilled and tapped one face for a 3/8 x 16 thread/inch carriage bolt and the opposite face I tapped a 6mm x 1mm thread/inch metric carriage bolt in case I'm working in metric (the metric one is what I had in my spare parts). Hardwood threads just fine with metal cutting taps but I used very slightly smaller drills than my charts called for. The carriage bolts I thought were a good choice as the domed heads are low drag and the square shoulders behind the heads make it easy to count turns for the fine adjusting.

There are many variations on this idea. This is only one of the possibilities.
 

Attachments

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
The other picture I tried uploading.
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: Murtu01 and Nickp

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,569 Posts
Looks interesting, Charles. Could you post a little more info on how it works? Thanks. Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
901 Posts
I've never used a thin-rip jig. I've always just set the fence close to the blade and used a sacrificial fence if it was really close; but I'm always up for a better ways to do things. I have a magnetic featherboard like this one. Could I just lock it down with the nose toward the workpiece and use it in place of the jig? Or am I missing something?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
487 Posts
Hi Charles, you are right to keep the fingers away from the blade. I cut a lot of 1/8" thick splines. Instead of sawing them that narrow, I plane the boards, maybe 6" wide, to 1/8" thick then use the table saw to cut them to the width that I need. It is much safer and ensures the correct thickness. My planer has spiral cutter head and has a 3/4" thick support board in the base of the planer. I have no problems planing wood that thin. Malcolm / Kentucky USA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
Hi Charles, you are right to keep the fingers away from the blade. I cut a lot of 1/8" thick splines. Instead of sawing them that narrow, I plane the boards, maybe 6" wide, to 1/8" thick then use the table saw to cut them to the width that I need. It is much safer and ensures the correct thickness. My planer has spiral cutter head and has a 3/4" thick support board in the base of the planer. I have no problems planing wood that thin. Malcolm / Kentucky USA
some times rips need to be done for grain orientation...
ie.. shape layups...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,603 Posts
I have been wondering for a long time why anyone would need a thin rip jig. I am left handed so my fence is one the right side of the blade. If I want to cut thin strips I put the board on the right side of the blade and adjust the fence for the thickness I want the thin strip to be. The thin strip just falls to the right of the blade. I know a jig would be better or y'all wouldn't be talking about it. So can you explain why a jig is better?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,456 Posts
Don

A jig is like a stop block - by keeping the jig in place and moving the fence, the size of the thin strips will always be the same but will prevent the strip from getting caught between the blade and the fence as the strip is cut to the opposite side of the blade.
I don't use a jig for thin strips - I use my GRR RPR with a 1/4" leg and the strip cut between the blade and the fence. The GRRpr allows you to push both pieces through to the outfeed side and maintaining control of the strip until it clears the blade.
You can get an accessory leg for the GRRPR that allows you to rip 1/8" strips.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
657 Posts
Don

A jig is like a stop block - by keeping the jig in place and moving the fence, the size of the thin strips will always be the same but will prevent the strip from getting caught between the blade and the fence as the strip is cut to the opposite side of the blade.
I don't use a jig for thin strips - I use my GRR RPR with a 1/4" leg and the strip cut between the blade and the fence. The GRRpr allows you to push both pieces through to the outfeed side and maintaining control of the strip until it clears the blade.
You can get an accessory leg for the GRRPR that allows you to rip 1/8" strips.
Vince, could you post some pics about this procedure?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
plan ''A'' (shorts)...

sled...
stop block set to thickness desired...
proceed w/ rips/crosscut...

plan ''B'' (long)...

set fence to thickness desired...
rip 60% of the stock's length...
lift stock off of blade...
flip stock end for end...
complete rip...
lift stock off of blade...
set drop aside...
repeat cycle...
 
  • Like
Reactions: jw2170

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Looks interesting, Charles. Could you post a little more info on how it works? Thanks. Jim
The jig is just a stop block Jim. It's not as easy to use as cutting between the fence and the blade but it is safer on really thin cuts. When you use this jig you move the fence over to a new (closer) position after every cut. The stop block gives you an accurate repeatable reference for resetting the fence so that all your cut offs will be the same. Instead of having the cut off piece between the blade and fence, you now have the piece falling off the outside of the blade.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
I will be needing some thin strips, but am planning to use the vid "
" to do it with.
He was able to make some very thin slices that way...
~M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
657 Posts

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
My jig will cut very thin slices too but like he said while he was demonstrating the method "If it's close to right thickness, that's usually good enough and I'm happy". Note that you need a zero clearance throat plate to be cutting slices that thin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,456 Posts
Vince, could you post some pics about this procedure?
@RÖENTGEEP

Joseph, here's a pic of the Grr-ripper setup for thin strips.
Mine is showing the 1/4" leg closest to the fence (you can get a 1/8" leg for even closer ripping.

The narrow leg pushes the cut off past the blade while the wider legs push the main work piece through as well.

You probably know, the L-shaped piece on the right, away from the fence, drops down to offer support if your work piece is narrower than the width of the gripper, preventing the Grr-ripper from tipping sideways.

And of course, the center leg can be adjusted, left to right.
 

Attachments

1 - 20 of 94 Posts
Top