Router Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,583 Posts
Thanks, Harry. It reminds me of the photos of the what is now the Great Smoky Mountain National Park in TN and NC. My son has two book relating the demand for lumber at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century. The mountains were clear cut with nothing left but bare dirt. What was sad is logging destroyed 80% of the habitat of the Appalachian strain of brook trout (actually a char). These fish required the coldest and cleanest water of the cold water species. The forest is recovering after all these years. I wish I lived closer so I could explore that park. My family and I have found the remains of logging camps and even the body of an old car. Can't bother it as these things protected by federal law. The park has an archeologist who is studying the park area and finding lots of interesting tidbits of history. The park is the most diverse ecosystem in the US. They do biological surveys periodically and are discovering new species of flora and fauna each time. G'day, mate!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,989 Posts
I grew up in a very old farmhouse, built before 1913, and built like a fence. Posts with long stringers between, with 1x14 inch redwood planks put up on both sides, like a fence. When I think of all that redwood and the size, I can imagine the size of the tree required to cut that much knot free, clear lumber. I wish we'd salvaged all of it, but at that time we didn't realize its true value.

Has anyone noticed how skinny all the workers in old pictures are? I can understand why when I think of the effort it would take to take down that large of a tree by hand. Hard work!
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,386 Posts
Getting them down was probably the easy part. How did they ever cut these up into usable lumber?
They drilled holes and put blasting powder in some of the biggest ones. One of my wife's uncles logged on Vancouver Island about 40 -50 years ago and he told stories about spruce trees so big that it would take a Caterpillar 966 loader on each end of a log and they would have to drop the stakes on one side of the truck and slide the log up ramps they made from other smaller logs. Then sometimes they would have to cut notches in the side of the log so that they could get the stakes back up again.
 
  • Like
Reactions: harrysin and MYB506
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top