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Wynn Environmental is a great choice! Also, its cool to see how most people build dust collection units. I wouldn't even know where to start. #genius #woodworking
This is a five year old string and kind of confusing. I'm a throat cancer survivor and some sawdust is carcinogenic, inhaling it over time can also lead to COPD because the ultra fine particles go in, but don't easily come out of your lungs.

I am a fan of the Harbor Freight 2hp duct collection unit. I have two shop areas and each has one. It comes with a bag that allows really fine particles through. So I roll one outside for use, the other I added a drum filter that catches fine stuff. However, that one recently got moved outside the shop and the sawdust comes through a tube through a wall. It sits in an enclosed space, along with a large Super Dust Deputy (see pix) The space is a covered area about 4 feet wide between two sheds.

The whole system in sequence starting from the tool:
1. 4 inch connector to fit the tool (All connectors are from Rockler)
2. 27 foot long expanding hose that I hook up to the tool in use
3. Y connector with a 2.5 inch branch that goes to the top of the table saw with a blast gate to close it when not in use.
4. A 4 inch through the wall connector that goes from shop to DC enclosure
5. Short flex tube from connector to the cyclone's intake side.
6. Super Dust Deputy mounted on top of a 30 gallon fiber drum (ULine) which collects most of the sawdust, chips, the odd screw or debris.
7. Two 90 degree connectors from top of Super Dust Deputy to direct flow down. These have a gentle curve and make a U shape.
8. Flex hose from U to the intake of the Harbor Freight DC unit (paid about $160 each on sale with a coupon-often on sale before holidays).
9. Harbor Freight 2hp DC unit.
10. Wynn 1 micron drum filter (today I'd buy the Grizzly drum with a built in beater bar to remove dust buildup on the inside of the filter)

The filtered air is recirculated back into the shop through an large opening, covered with an ordinary 20x20 AC filter. This is to return heated or AC air back into the shop.

I also buy the HF medical type mask which I use when I'm only making a small number of cuts. For longer projects, I take time to put on a Rockler battery powered respirator mask. I keep a couple of sets of 4 AA rechargeable batteries, which last several hours. I like the way this mask fits, and blows pressurized air out of the top, which keeps my glasses clear.

The HF unit in my garage still has only the cloth filter bag, so I always roll it out of the shop when using it. It services my bandsaw, planer, the jointer, and with an adapter, catches dust from my track saw.

All my tools with 2.5 inch dust ports, I've mounted 2.5 inch hoses with 2.5 to 4 inch connectors. I just push the adapter into the 4 inch main hose.

I don't do a whole lot of woodworking all the time, so the Harbor Freight unit is more than adequate for my purposes. Stick, however, insists you're better off buying something like the Jet units, but he and I disagree because for ordinary use, the HF unit costs far less. He always compares the airflow increase in the Jet and the $100 impeller upgrade for the HF unit. I think he is right for a busy shop, but my two HF units are less than half the cost of one Jet brand unit. My HF unit with a Wynn Drum filter added on top is about the same cost as the smaller Jet unit, which only comes with a bag filter. It's your money and your choice.

The Thein filter shown in this string is a really good alternative to the Super Dust Deputy. It will require that you have at least a 30 gallon or more capacity drum or trash can container. Rockler woodworking has a pair of connectors that go throuh the lid then direct the air into a circular pattern. I added a picture of that. I stick with Rockler dust collection parts because the fit together nicely. I have had zero luck trying to mix brands because they never fit anything else. I have a large box of these misfits that shold probably be recycled with water bottles. Sorry I wasted all that money, so I suggest you do stick with Rockler.

Attached pictures include:
1. My DC setup in the enclosed space between my shop shed and office shed. It is pretty well sealed to recirculate heated/AC air back into the shop through the filter vent in the upper right.
2. The Harbor Freight DC unit with a Wynn Filter on top instead of the filter bag it comes with. If you keep it inside the shop, DO GET THE DRUM FILTER!!!
3. The connectors I mentioned in the list above.
4. My dog, Henry, who snoozed faithfully by my side as I wrote this dusty novella.
5. An overview of the cyclone, chip collector drum and DC unit so you can see the flow clearly.
6. The Rockler chip collector setup without using a cyclone. This works pretty well, but it isn't easy to find a flat topped trash can, so you should order at least a 30 gallone fiber drum from Uline.com. You can cut the opening for either a cyclone or the two openings for the Rockler setup with a jig saw with a metal cutting blade.
7. The handle connector at the end of the 27 foot flex hose, with the long floor cleanup tube attached. Remove the tube and this plugs into the dust port. Note that the hose exits at a 45 degree angle which improves air flow.
8. The Rockler respirator mask I like so much. But any decent quality mask will help.
9. WEN hanging filter unit. Hang from ceiling, has timer and speed control (remote). Leave on for 2-4 hours after you leave the shop to filter out the ultra fine sawdust that floats in the air. Mount near a wall to establish a circular air flow. I found this on sale for $99, a steal. You'll be amazed at how the air feels better after you run this for awhile.
5. My dog, Henry, who snoozed faithfully by my side as I wrote this dusty novella.

Hope this clarifies things for you. I spent a lot of time and money trying to build something shop built that worked. Wish I'd just done this to begin with. Don't wait too long to set up dust collection, particularly if you're using MDF, which is the nastiest of all sawdust types. Start with the mask.
 

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@DesertRatTom...

in this picture you advocate a floor pick up..



have you ever stopped to consider the ramifications of accidentally injecting metal FOD (nails, screws, bolts, washers, etc) into your DC???
the possibility of creating sparks when the FOD hits the impeller is very good or very bad..
those sparks are all you need to start a fire, which may take hours and hours before it flares, in the collected sawdust...
the possibility exists, so why risk or take it..
put out a sawdust fire sometime and let us know how that works out for ya...
Yup. The dust deputy and chip collector handled all that years ago. BTW, I have shortened and straightened out all hoses in my system and will likely replace one, five-foot length of flex hose from DD output to DC input with metal pipe, which will allow me to use a 5 inch pipe instead of 4 inch. I've had a chip collector of some sort from the first shop made attempt at dust collection. The HF unit does not have a metal impeller. Been more than a decade of developing my system, learning as I go, thanks to this forum. I'm going to check out sweeps for that purpose, didn't know that's what they were called.

I am thinking over how to connect the 4-inch, 27ft. hose to the router fence so I don't have a reducer there. The sliding miter is the worst dust offender, and behind that I have a shower curtain that catches the majority of sawdust and drops it down into a box with a 4 inch port at the bottom. Works OK, just have to tap the curtain sides to drop the dust down. Been too busy with the theater conversion project to do anything with it just now.
 

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not everyone has a dust deputy...
might be a good idea to add a warning.disclaimer for those that haven't one...
Good idea Stick. I do think you MUST have a chip collector of some sort for any workable system, and that will suppress screws and sparkable stuff from hitting an impeller, even in a shop vac. I saw a review of the Home Depot separator that rated it only slightly below the smaller dust deputy. So even someone with a very low budget and a shop vac can have a separator. I think many newbies see the Thein as above their present skill level.

On the dust output of a jointer, it's pretty fluffy, so a separator of some sort is a must. My Powermatic quickly clogs up if I forget to thurn on the DC (happens). But the DeWalt 735 just needs a receptical that puts the fluff into a container without the need for a DC unit. Just have to make a screened exit for the air flow to escape faster than it comes in.

Here's the drawing of a boxed collector unit I was thinking of making for the 735. It would probably have a drawer with a side door to access the drawer. It will fill up fast.

Then again, I could probably do it with a trash barrel and a plywood top with a port and large screened area.
 

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Unlikely to change my cleanup procedure much. Have a shop vac I might try to use. Need to get a small DD for it for that purpose. Has to move around easily. Not an issue just now.
 

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I'd have to do a cleanup before I could use a dust pan to clean up before I use the shop vac to clean up. These days I keep a Sharps container on hand and all the screws and such get put in there.
 

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@Stick486 They're doing just fine, better still since I rearranged, shortened and straightened the connections. Have to do the same for the one in the garage, but other matters are more pressing. We're just talking loose screws here.
 
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