Router Forums banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am new here and new to woodworking from a wheelchair. Handling and ripping 4 x 8 sheets on a table saw was always trying for me when I could walk. But now sitting in this darn chair (although I am thankful for it) it seems impossible to me. I am looking at track saws and also maybe making a DIY track system. I saw a neat one on YouTube.

My question is: Has anyone here used or own a track saw and does it work for ripping sheets of plywood to size? And also do you get a smooth, non tear out cut on the saw side of the board?

Thanks,

Chuck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Hi Chuck

Because your in the wheelchair I would suggest a panel saw setup, you can buy one or make your own from plans and kits..you can build it to suit your needs. :) here's just one of many..

Shop Built Panel Saw Plan - Rockler Woodworking Tools

==========


I am new here and new to woodworking from a wheelchair. Handling and ripping 4 x 8 sheets on a table saw was always trying for me when I could walk. But now sitting in this darn chair (although I am thankful for it) it seems impossible to me. I am looking at track saws and also maybe making a DIY track system. I saw a neat one on YouTube.

My question is: Has anyone here used or own a track saw and does it work for ripping sheets of plywood to size? And also do you get a smooth, non tear out cut on the saw side of the board?

Thanks,

Chuck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I think BJ's suggestion was excellent. In response to your question regarding track saws, I have and use a Festool tracksaw exactly for the purpose you mentioned, cutting and resizing plywood. It's much easier for a person working alone to handle full sheets of plywood. Plus, it very accurate and the cuts are truly splinter free and with a shop vac attached it's almost dust free.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I have and use a Festool tracksaw exactly for the purpose you mentioned, cutting and resizing plywood. It's much easier for a person working alone to handle full sheets of plywood. Plus, it very accurate and the cuts are truly splinter free and with a shop vac attached it's almost dust free.
Thanks

That is good to know about the Festool. Handling the plywood sheets is going to be the hard part. That is why I ave been looking at track saws.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Hi Chuck

Handling the plywood sheets is the hard part for us all, but here's a tool that may help with the job, see link below, that why the panel saw makes it easy to just slide it off the truck and right into the panel saw rack...you can also build a track saw cutting table but getting to the center of the panel is a real PITA....but I think you will get a kick out of the link below :)

Router Forums - View Single Post - Joke a Day

Be careful what you wish for :)

=======

Thanks

That is good to know about the Festool. Handling the plywood sheets is going to be the hard part. That is why I ave been looking at track saws.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,910 Posts
I am new here and new to woodworking from a wheelchair. Handling and ripping 4 x 8 sheets on a table saw was always trying for me when I could walk. But now sitting in this darn chair (although I am thankful for it) it seems impossible to me. I am looking at track saws and also maybe making a DIY track system. I saw a neat one on YouTube.

My question is: Has anyone here used or own a track saw and does it work for ripping sheets of plywood to size? And also do you get a smooth, non tear out cut on the saw side of the board?

Thanks,

Chuck
Chuck, I have no experience with track saws but for my entire "career" as a router user I have been confined to a wheelchair. I know exactly whereof you speak when you write "this darn chair (although I am thankful for it)".

I will shortly be confronted with a very similar issue to the one you describe. All I have however is a circular saw and some straight edges so I thank you for starting this thread and I will be following it with great interest.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,437 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
In addition to Bj's suggestion, you may want to take a look at something this. It does offer an accessory for circular saws and routers, if this is all you have.
That clamp guide must be a good one. I see that they're all sold out
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Chuck, I have no experience with track saws but for my entire "career" as a router user I have been confined to a wheelchair. I know exactly whereof you speak when you write "this darn chair (although I am thankful for it)".

I will shortly be confronted with a very similar issue to the one you describe. All I have however is a circular saw and some straight edges so I thank you for starting this thread and I will be following it with great interest.
Thanks Tom

Right now I am designing the benches and router table to accept a wheelchair, putting a "Bill of Materials" together and ordering the lumber. This looks like a project and a 1/2. I think I am going to have to call in some help.

The track saw really interests me. The price doesn't. I have looked at a couple of DIY tracks that I am checking out.

Will keep in touch

Chuck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Chuck..

a little food for thought:


Thanks

The one I have seen but the 2nd one with the wood guide rail I hadn't. It is amazing what one can find on YouTube. I am really leaning towards making one of those and trying it before I write that check for a commercial track saw.

Thanks for the links

Chuck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Chuck,

The panel saw will work well.

As an EHS (Env, Health and Safety) Manager - I have work to build accomodations for specific jobs for employees who have minimal of no use of legs.

One of the most important things to consider is the frequency with which you will be doing the task, other environmental factors/conditions, as well as other available resources.

I own a Festool track saw and think it would work well for you. If you have a truck - in the summer you can actually use your tailgate and a sawghorse in the drive-way to actually cut your panels down to size. I have done this myself. It can also possibly be down in an oversized garage.

Heck - I know one contractor who commnly does it with a straght edge and a Dewalt 18V Circular saw. Typically he is cutting oversized doors 9up to 11') as opposed to panels.

The beautiful part is it allows you to take advantage of sliding as opposed to having to lift the panels.

I will admit that I now have a Festool bias, but it hard to use their Tracksaw and not be impressed. I rough and final cut sheet goods on with my tracksaw.

Many track saw owners place the sheets on top of styreform panels and break it down to size right on there shop floor.

I would recommend keeping at chair height - so maybe you can fine a lumber cart and break it down right on the cart.

If you get (2) 2x or 4x pieces of stock about 5 ft long and attach it to a shop wall where it can swivel down at 90 degrees and space them 5-6 feet apart. You can nail sheet of styreform to them. The unit can fold up agains the wall when not it use.

To use it simply lower the unit so its perpendencular to the wall and slide the sheet off teh cart onto the platform. You can use this as a ripping station for sheet goods.

Just throwing out ideas.

Good Luck - keep us informed on your progress.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,437 Posts
That clamp guide must be a good one. I see that they're all sold out

This is the unfortunate case with Rocklers. However, the bright side is, check with Grizzly, Eagle America and possibly Woodcraft. I believe they sell the same item. Might be cheaper, might be higher, just depends on who is selling and if they have a sale going on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Chuck,

The panel saw will work well.


One of the most important things to consider is the frequency with which you will be doing the task, other environmental factors/conditions, as well as other available resources.
I own a Festool track saw and think it would work well for you.
I will admit that I now have a Festool bias, but it hard to use their Tracksaw and not be impressed. I rough and final cut sheet goods on with my tracksaw.

Just throwing out ideas.

Good Luck - keep us informed on your progress.
WOW!!! Thanks

That's some good information. I like ideas.

That sentence of yours about "One of the most important things to consider is the frequency with which you will be doing the task" is one I consider a lot. Once I get all the cabinets, benches and tables built, I probably won't have much use for the track saw or panel saw. That's why the DIY track have a great appeal to me. I am probably talking about a total of 8 sheets of plywood.
Decisions...Decisions





...AND HAMLIN

This is the unfortunate case with Rocklers. However, the bright side is, check with Grizzly, Eagle America and possibly Woodcraft. I believe they sell the same item. Might be cheaper, might be higher, just depends on who is selling and if they have a sale going on.
Thanks,

I will check those other places out
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,698 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Check this monster out.
You just press the button and it does the cutting by itself. No need for a long reaching arm.
YouTube - Mafell PSS3100e Panel Saw
Now that is the saw to buy. And it's only 2,021 Lira too.
Lets see. I have 8 sheets of plywood to cut...maybe 9

I do love that push button feature though.

What I really need is some extra money
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Chuck, If 8 or 9 sheets of ply is all you need to cut why don't you just ask your lumber yard what they'd charge to cut them for you? I ran a lumber yard for years and we charged for doing just about everything including cutting plywood. Try approaching your yard and see what they'd charge to cut the ply for you, you might be surprised. There's nothing particulary thrilling about cutting plywood to size anyway. Save your money and woodworking skills for the other stuff that's more interesting and enjoyable.
Randy
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top