Router Forums banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
869 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'll be making some laminate counter tops and will need to trim the laminate. I have a Roto Zip but would probably be better off with a Compact Trim Router. I've read several magazine reviews but would like some more recommendations from you folks. Thank You.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Bosch Colt if you really want a trimmer but the people that own a Makita also seem to be happy with them. If you go just a little bigger the DW 611, especially in the combo package where you also get a plunge base, is a good choice. There are quite a few of us on the forum now that own one and I don't remember seeing any reviews on it that were unfavourable from anyone.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Roy Drake

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,603 Posts
The Makita also has a model that comes with a plunge base. If you don't want to spend the money for a trim router your Roto-Zip will do the job.

PS- Of coarse having a trim router is nice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,921 Posts
Jim, the Trend T-4 might be a good solution for you. It is priced lower than other brands and has more power too. It includes a dust collection port that is similar to what is found on the big Festool OF2200EB; it seals around the bit for better dust collection. In close quarters the Colt is the champ since it is considerably smaller than the others.(Using the standard base) I was uncomfortable with the offset handles on the DeWalt but others have no problem with them. Any of these models would be easier to control than your Rotozip. While members are happy with the Makita it has been my experience that their customer service is sorely lacking.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,921 Posts
One other thing, the Trend T-4 has the largest selection of guide bushings for more possible offsets than anyone else. Sets are available in metric odd number sizes, metric even number sizes and in fractional sizes. There is also an adapter plate for using PC style guide bushings.
 

Attachments

·
Marine Engineer
Doug
Joined
·
4,785 Posts
Couple of questions:

A- do you need a trim router? I trimmed a lot of counter tops with just a regular router, just have to make sure you do it before final installation

B- are you going to need a trim router again in the future? I used to have a few HF trim routers when sign making, got rid of them and now only have a little Ridgid one that is rarely used. Most of the time I can use the 'bigger' routers.

C- does it have to be new? I can usually find a trim router for cheap on Craigslist or other similar sites on a regular basis. >>>>>RIDGID laminate trimmer <<<<<In fact, my trimmer is for sale near you right now for $60 with bits....



I reviewed it a while back http://www.routerforums.com/tool-reviews/23918-ridgid-r2400-laminate-trimmer.html#post204830

I honestly don't know if I would buy a trim router again if I had to do it all over again. I have a Sears rotozip style router that does all of the 1/8" collet jobs, and plenty of routers for the other jobs. It comes in handy when needed, but it almost isn't needed enough to justify the convenience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
869 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Couple of questions:

A- do you need a trim router? I trimmed a lot of counter tops with just a regular router, just have to make sure you do it before final installation

B- are you going to need a trim router again in the future? I used to have a few HF trim routers when sign making, got rid of them and now only have a little Ridgid one that is rarely used. Most of the time I can use the 'bigger' routers.

C- does it have to be new? I can usually find a trim router for cheap on Craigslist or other similar sites on a regular basis. >>>>>RIDGID laminate trimmer <<<<<In fact, my trimmer is for sale near you right now for $60 with bits....



I reviewed it a while back http://www.routerforums.com/tool-reviews/23918-ridgid-r2400-laminate-trimmer.html#post204830

I honestly don't know if I would buy a trim router again if I had to do it all over again. I have a Sears rotozip style router that does all of the 1/8" collet jobs, and plenty of routers for the other jobs. It comes in handy when needed, but it almost isn't needed enough to justify the convenience.
I've got a DeWalt 618 2 1/4 hp. I have used it for hand held flush trimming. It worked but I had to be more diligent than I figure I would have had to be if I had used a trimmer. I just thought a trimmer would be easier to handle and less risky....don't want to botch the job. I've watched some videos and the trimmer seemed pretty easy vs what I envisioned with a larger router. I don't anticipate a lot of use in the future....my project is a one and done. Like the roto zip it'll have its job specific uses. Most trimming will be done before final installation so maybe I can stand the counter top on edge so the router can sit on the edge to be trimmed....a couple of pieces will have to be trimmed after installation.
I think you have talked me out of buying a trim router.
 

·
Marine Engineer
Doug
Joined
·
4,785 Posts
The best thing you can do is make an offset base or an edge guide to eliminate the possibility of the router tipping over the edge. That is the biggest risk when trimming a counter top.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,625 Posts
No trimmer has it all but the R2401 is my first choice. Notwithstanding, I agree with KP, a one time job is not an excuse for another purchase.
Blasphemy... :)

It's the only way to build up an inventory that will be nice and clean, except for the dust...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,625 Posts
Jim...if you need a trim router, I would suggest touching and handling as many as you can. It's all about the feel in your hand as they are basically all the same.

Then add customer service to that...everything else you can compromise...

I bought the Ridgid for no other reason than it felt most comfortable in my hand...I think it has the most HP also (not that it has anything to do with the price of apples anyway)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,323 Posts
C- does it have to be new?
I have to agree with Doug. I picked up a Craftsman Trim router at a yard sale for $10. If I recall correctly, I believe this model was make by Ryobi. It was practically new and is perfect for breaking edges, flush trimming small items and all of the normal trim router duties. I have used it for several years, now, and it has more then payed for itself.

If the router went south tomorrow, I would not cry about it. It was cheap, it is reliable if it isn't stretched past its limits and perfectly serviceable.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,239 Posts
I bought a Colt originally to install hinges, but like using it for trim jobs. I think it will also be great for signs. If I were buying again, I'd give the Makita careful consideration because the reviews are very friendly for the Makita. I could use the 1617 Bosch for most trim jobs I have to do, but the light weight of the trim router makes it much easier to control.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,056 Posts
For what your looking the router to do, the Colt is an excellent choice. Power, weight and size all lend themselves to trim work. Upgrading to a plunge base makes it all the more attractive. But IMHO you'll be limited to smallish tasks with the Colt. I've had one for several years now, and barring the one collet that crapped out on me, its been a worry free router. Years back, Craftsman offered a router very similar to the Trend mentioned above. Wasn't a big fan. The router always felt top heavy and if you were not careful, tended to tip. PLunge base was garbage. The Dewalt 611 is a great router!! A very nice balance between power and size and over all ultility. The 611 w/plunge base has become my go to router for just about everything not requiring a table. I'd go with the 611 only because down the road you'll have considerably more options available to you in terms of flexibility. The last few years the Rigid has garnished alot of positive feedback. Another worthy of taking a look at. For the most part, it comes down to cost, availability and FEEL. If you do go with a new one, go with one that feels good in your hands....eliminate the "this just don't feel right" from the project and you're halfway done.

and for what its worth, I've a 25+ year old garage find Craftsman trim that has continued to work just fine for the 20+ years I've owned it

just another couple cents worth :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,459 Posts
"I agree with KP, a one time job is not an excuse for another purchase."
-Pat

What Nick said! And coming from the guy with the most droolworthy collection of tools and jigs!! LOL
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,056 Posts
Then there is always the possibility that this is merely a rouse. An ingeniously disguised ploy to cleverly obtain a a much wanted new tool :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
692 Posts
The Trend also doubles as a die grinder, but not just any one - it's a variable speed one.

I sold my die grinder and just use the Trend for the rare occasions I need to hog material off some project.

Since you have a good array of collets, you can pop a burr in and sawdust some wood, if that is your want.



One other thing, the Trend T-4 has the largest selection of guide bushings for more possible offsets than anyone else. Sets are available in metric odd number sizes, metric even number sizes and in fractional sizes. There is also an adapter plate for using PC style guide bushings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
692 Posts
As to rouses and excuses, that can be covered by the fact you often don't know you need something until after you buy it.

I use one of my Colts on a carving machine. The other gets used for 1/4" straight bits a lot. I, often, forget the Porter Cable trimmer, though I like its feel.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top