Router Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am looking for a trim router with a 3/8" collet and preferably with veriable speed control. I will be using it for a very specific purpose where 1-1.5 hp will be more than enough and a compact body would be ideal. From my searching I haven't been able to find anything. If a trim router with a 3/8" collet is unattainable, does anyone make a 1/4" to 3/8" union or adapter?

Thanks for any input.

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,229 Posts
Just looked it up and Bing showed some listings you can check out for collets and adapters. https://www.bing.com/search?q=3/8ths+router+collet&pc=MOZI&form=MOZSBR

Woodcraft has a half inch to 3/8th acapter you can order online. https://www.woodcraft.com/products/witeside-6402-router-bit-shank-reducer-1-2-to-3-8

As to the router, all the trim routers anywhere near the hp you want are 1/4 inch shank.

I'd go with the Bosch 1617 EVSPK kit, occasionally $200-$220 for the kit. It is a 2 1/4 hp unit, but pretty easy to handle. Gets high praise around here. The kit includes the plunge base. You can get the fixed base only, even the motor only, but buying the other parts of the kit separately will go way over the price mentioned. Look for it on sale and get Lowe's to match the price. And Bosch has a stock 3/8ths collet available as well.

The power of the Bosch is a little higher, 3/4 hp more, than what you specified, but the diameter of the motor is pretty standard and the fixed base can be installed in a table if you wish.

Here's the cheapest price I found on the Bosch 3/8ths collet (not just an adapter) for #12.99 from CPO. https://www.woodcraft.com/products/whiteside-6402-router-bit-shank-reducer-1-2-to-3-8

Well,
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
My old DeWalt 610 is 1 to 1.5 and it had 1/4,3/8, and 1/2 sizes available but they are a discontinued model. Maybe the PC 690 is similar. To find an actual trim router which would be 1 hp or less and capable of taking a 3/8 collet may be hard to find.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
what you trying to do is going to take a router that has/takes a ½'' collet and reduce from there...
going up from a ¼'' is next to impossible and lends to be unsafe...
 
  • Like
Reactions: DesertRatTom

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Tom,

Thanks for the info. I never took the time to check out woodcrafts website. I have another great resource now. I have a 1617 EVSPK and I'm very fond of it. However I feel it's too much router in power and size for my needs.

Chuck,

The 610 looks close to what I'm looking for. It's a shame it's been discontinued. I will have to do some more research into the PC 690.

Stick,

I agree that I'm likely going to have to find a compact 1/2" collet router and use a 3/8" collet on it. However what I'm trying to do is far from dangerous if I had something like a muscle chuck that adapted from 1/4" to 3/8".

I plan on building 2 machines. A pocket hole, and a loose mortise machine like a Kreg Foreman and a benchtop domino. I have some sketches of the pocket hole machine and currently drafting it into a CAD/CAM program but need dimensions of the router I will be using. I will be starting with the pocket hole machine using a 3/8" carbide pocket hole drill through a hardened tool steel drill bushing. Given that there will be minimal lateral forces on the bit, and there will only be a .125" diameter difference, it will be quite safe.

I did find a Chinese Makita trim router knockoff on ebay that had a 3/8" collet a couple weeks ago, but I would like to stick to a name brand router due to reliability and parts are availability.

I was looking to buy a Kreg Foreman but thought it was a little over priced so I held off till I could see one in person. And when I did, I was disappointed.

As a toolmaker I have access to a full machine shop, vendors, and materials to where I could make a compact commercial grade machine for less than a Forman. To keep things compact, I was looking for a trim router.

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
I can't ever remember see adapters for a router adapt upward in capability. The trend is always downwards and that is because of the fragility of the 1/4" shank. Although using a 3/8" straight bit wouldn't be that hard on it, somebody, somewhere would try something much larger resulting in a lost finger or eye.

Hardened steel drill bushings are meant to be used at low speed with HSS bits. If you were to use a carbide up cut ( my choice for what you are suggesting) then the geometry of entry into the bushing would need to be perfect and if it was that perfect then you don't need the drill bushing. Drill bushings are for handheld use. If you are building a machine to do the job then it's not required. Pocket hole machines are far from new but as best I can remember of the ones I've looked at they hinged the router and swung down into the piece with a flat bottomed router bit which formed the pocket rather than a plunge motion.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top