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Shop our H7583 - Tenoning Jig at Grizzly.com
This is the tenoning jig I bought to use in my new tablesaw. I thought it would produce accurate enough results.
Reading up a bit more, to get a suitable " friction " fit I might need to trim the cheeks of a tenon to fit the mortise. I read I could use a rabbating block plane to get the tenon cheeks just the right fit?
A rabbet plane in an available blade width size I assume will be ok for window sash tenons?
Someone said to use a Record 073 shoulder plane to trim the tenon cheeks, perhaps also a firmer chisel. That said, the Record 073 is 1-1/4″ wide whereas a house door tenon could be around 2-1/2".
Using the Record wouldn't produce a uniform cut all along the tenon.
I've read about a router plane but I don't think that would be suitable for a house door tenon.
Any help appreciated,
Thanks.
 

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Peter, once it is dialed in your jig should produce tenons clean enough for a good fit. You do need to leave room for the glue. I used a similar jig when I built my son's crib bed.
 

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Stick according to Phil P most saws over there won't accept a dado set, the arbor is too short.

Pete you can always fine tune the tenon on the tenon jig. I have a Delta that is basically the same. If you need a paper thin layer taken off then shim between the jig and the board with a piece of paper, etc. You can also use a heavy gauge card scraper to fine tune or use a stiff bodied sanding block. There is always the chance that you'll get it a bit uneven with the scraper or sanding it but you can with a plane too. The plane will require less effort if set up and sharpened properly but I don't know if you want to spend that much money on a fairly specialized tool like that.
 
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Peter, I use the Delta version (it looks identical) of the tenon jig, and this is what I found. First of all each of the rails and stiles must be of equal thickness because the tenon jig registers off of the outside faces of your stock. Secondly mark your tenon adjustment screw so you know which direction to turn it... to move the fence closer or farther from the blade.

Cut the cheeks to the proper location using a combination or a crosscut blade.

When using the tenon jig... use a ripping blade.

Adjust the blade depth on your table saw so the blade will enter the crosscut saw kerf, but Not high enough to contact the cheek.

Adjust your tenon jig to cut the tenon oversize. Then pass over the blade in one direction and unclamp the board.

Return the tenon jig to its starting position, flip the board to cut the other face. At this point you can test the fit (it should be oversize), then make an adjustment to your jig to shave a little more until you sneak up to the correct fit.

I found that if you push the tenon jig over the blade and then pull it back with the board still clamped, the blade could change the dimension of the tenon.

I hope this helps. I learned these tricks making 8 large window sashes for a cottage.
 

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Making super clean tenons has been a challenge to me in the past but I saw this video and tried it for the base of my recent hall table project. It worked really well. Very easy to dial in the exact thickness for the mortise. There are a couple of points in the video about how to do this safely that are worth heeding but over all it's fast and clean.

edit - by the way, I have the rockler version of that tenoning jig and found it to be pretty complicated to set up and use. The above technique is 10X easier.
 

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Making super clean tenons has been a challenge to me in the past but I saw this video and tried it for the base of my recent hall table project. It worked really well. Very easy to dial in the exact thickness for the mortise. There are a couple of points in the video about how to do this safely that are worth heeding but over all it's fast and clean.

edit - by the way, I have the rockler version of that tenoning jig and found it to be pretty complicated to set up and use. The above technique is 10X easier.
same method here...
only w/ a dado blade...
going horizontal beats vertical any day...
 

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Yeah, the dado makes a cleaner face on the tenon than a crosscut blade. Guess, I'm just a lil lazy when it comes to switching saw blades. If I don't HAVE to, I won't.
 

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dedicated TS....
 

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I've used the method in the video, but primarily, if I'm doing a number of tenons, I leave them to the end, then use a dado stack. Only takes a few minutes to change out the blade.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Peter, once it is dialed in your jig should produce tenons clean enough for a good fit. You do need to leave room for the glue. I used a similar jig when I built my son's crib bed.
Yes I've found out how to use it to get a close fit.
Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Stick according to Phil P most saws over there won't accept a dado set, the arbor is too short.

Pete you can always fine tune the tenon on the tenon jig. I have a Delta that is basically the same. If you need a paper thin layer taken off then shim between the jig and the board with a piece of paper, etc. You can also use a heavy gauge card scraper to fine tune or use a stiff bodied sanding block. There is always the chance that you'll get it a bit uneven with the scraper or sanding it but you can with a plane too. The plane will require less effort if set up and sharpened properly but I don't know if you want to spend that much money on a fairly specialized tool like that.
Thanks, I've been finding out I should be able to set it up to do a good tenon and fine tune it using the micro adjust. Cheapest quality rabbet block plane over here is around £70. Don't need one now.
 

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1 for dado...
1 for glue line..
1 for GP...
 

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I would use a router plane. It is a easy way to sneak up on the thickness but you can also set it so the tenon is precise. They are not that expensive you find one on ebay for less than $70.00 and it will last your lifetime and more.
 
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