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I've tried several ways to trim wood banding that has been applied to melamine, mdf, or plywood. The way I tried last night turned out to be the fastest and easiest of all the ways that I've tried it so far. The idea isn't new, it is a method used on a table saw where you add an auxiliary fence onto your standard one but lift it off the saw surface enough so that the banding goes under it. Then you set the rig up so that the outer edge of the saw blade is flush with the outside edge of the auxiliary fence and run the work through on edge.

I had never thought of trying that on a router table before but all you have to do is add a spacer under the fence so that you leave enough gap for the edge banding to go under and then set the fence flush with the bit. Quick and easy.
 

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Theo
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Yeah, I would use the router too. But my method is pretty crude compared to yours. About everything I make, I nail masters to them, holds them nicely, and the nail holes will be hidden in the finished product. For things like you did, I tack a straightedge along the side, set so I can rout the whatever off nice and neat. Nice for making straight edges too.
 

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I've tried several ways to trim wood banding that has been applied to melamine, mdf, or plywood. The way I tried last night turned out to be the fastest and easiest of all the ways that I've tried it so far. The idea isn't new, it is a method used on a table saw where you add an auxiliary fence onto your standard one but lift it off the saw surface enough so that the banding goes under it. Then you set the rig up so that the outer edge of the saw blade is flush with the outside edge of the auxiliary fence and run the work through on edge.

I had never thought of trying that on a router table before but all you have to do is add a spacer under the fence so that you leave enough gap for the edge banding to go under and then set the fence flush with the bit. Quick and easy.

That's the way to keep it simple...great solution...
 

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Paul
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Nice. I imagine that you could even use a small round-over.
 

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Good tip, Charles.
 
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