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I have a project that needs a bushing for a cut but Tritons bushing set (TGA250) is about $100. Does anyone else make bushings which are compatible with the Triton TRA001?
Thanks,
Doug
 

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Welcome to the forum Doug. I don't have your router or answer but am willing to bet you'll hear soon. This is a well informed and talented group willing to assist and answer questions.
 

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Like Steve, I don't know about your router but it looks like that set includes an adapter for 'standard' PC style bushings. I wonder if that is available separately because it seems like a rather costly set.
 

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https://bistritontools.com/tga250-triton-template-guide-kit-12pc.html The lower center piece is meant to use PC style bushings according to the product description. The question is whether you can find that piece separately. A set of PC bushings is only around $20. My Hitachis use a plate like that but without a Triton router to compare them to I can't say if they would interchange.
 

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It would be easy enough to replace the whole base plate of the Triton router with one of the universal base plates that are designed to use the Porter Cable style router bushings, or you could make of your own. Here is one to give you the idea of what I'm talking about, but Infinity is only one of many sources for these. https://www.infinitytools.com/universal-router-baseplates. I think going this way will give you many more options and save you money too. Porter Cable style router bushing sets can be had for about $20 and up from almost every woodworking supply store.

To make one yourself, remove your existing router base piece. A piece of clear Lexan 1/8-1/4 thick would be the best choice to make the new one from and it needs to be large enough for the size of the base of your router. It's outer dimension and shape needs to be chosen to fit your need. Sometimes square or rectangular is better than round. Install a small diameter sharp bit in the router and plunge it through the center of the Lexan piece. Shut the router off with this bit still down through the hole. Then mark the centers of all of the locations of all of the mounting holes of the router base. There is usually three or four. A transfer punch set like this https://www.harborfreight.com/28-piece-transfer-punch-set-3577.html will let you choose the largest punch to fit in each hole and the point will make a mark that is perfectly centered for each hole. Pointed screws can also be used for this. A light tap on the back end of the punch will mark the Lexan exactly in the center, so you can drill a hole in perfect alignment to the router base plate hole. Now you can remove this piece of Lexan and drill it for the mounting holes. Don't use bolts with cone shaped heads (flat heat). You want to use pan head screws and counter bore the holes so their heads sit flush with the surface of the new router base. You can measure the ones in the original Triton base to determine their size or just use the original screws. You will want a little slop in these holes, so you can fine tune the bushing position to the router collet, as it will need to be perfectly centered in relation to the router bit. Plunging of the first center hole got you close to center, but you will need to open up this center hole to 1 1/8" to accept the router bushings. Countersinking of this center hole will also need to be done so the flange of the Porter Cable router bushing sits flush in this new base too. I do this step with a small diameter rabbeting bit in my router table. The bearing on the bit will ride the inside of the center hole while the rabbeting bit creates the recess for the router bushing collar.

When complete, a Porter Cable style router bushing should fit the center hole of your new base plate and the shoulder of the bushing should be flush with the bottom surface of your new router base plate. The mounting screws (you can use the original screws should allow you to attach this new base plate to your Triton router and their heads should also be flush with the bottom of the new base plate. You should then be able to loosen these mounting screws and the "little wobble" of these slightly oversize holes should let you align the router bushing to the router collet using a router bushing cone alignment tool. Once centered about the cone that's in the collet of the router you then tighten the mounting screws, locking the base and bushing centered with the router collet.


Charley
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks to you all for the reply's and recommendations. I will try to make an adapter plate based on Charley's method.
Doug
 

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Use the 1/4 inch. You can drill a small through hole, then a larger one for the pan head, so it's recessed. Theoretically you can drill the through hole a little loose, then using a centering cone, make minor adjustments to get the opening centered on the bit.
 
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