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I've made a loom for making twined rag rugs for daughter (see below). It has a couple of braces on the sides to hold the frame at angles for access during weaving. I made the braces with 1/4+" holes for 1/4-20 hardware.


But now want to modify this arrangement to make the adjustment positions slots rather than holes. And I probably want the openings of the slots to be wider than the bottom.


I'm wondering what is the best way to open these up. Do a full width plunge with a 1/4" router bit, using a miter gauge to impart a little bit of angle and flipping it around to give the other side some angle? Or bandsaw out the middle and do the above as cleanup passes with the router bit on both sides?

Nominally, I would do the latter, because bandsawing is easy and to minimize the amount of cutting the router bit has to do. But, sometimes, cutting tools like to have nice full bites. Also, I'm thinking the free-hand/miter gauge router passes may be easier to control taking just a little bit.

Thanks,

Rick
 

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I would set the desired angle on my table saw but it doesn't look like you have one so If you need accuracy then an angle jig on one of the bandsaws. If not necessary to be really accurate then just draw what you want and free hand it.
 
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I think I'd use a Japanese saw. I'd make a small jig like the drawing in a trapezoid shape with the angle you want for each cut, with a small block on the back to hold it in place while making the cut. I'd make the front out of at least half inch hardwood scrap so it will resist being cut in the process.

Hold the dozuki style saw (with the rigid back) as you would a chef's knife, a finger on the side to keep it from shifting on you, then place the saw against the edge of the jig and probably less than 4 pulls and it will cut through, making an extremely smooth edge.

By the time you set up a saw or router to do this cut, you could be finished with the Japanese saw. If you don't yet have a Dozuki saw, you have no idea what you're missing. Once you use it you will reach for it often, cutting is like slicing butter. Here are pictures of the two types of Japanese saws. The first has no backer, the second shows three types with backers. I like the longer saw best Amazon. About $35 as I recall. You can't have these sharpened, so when it gets too dull to use (that will take a long time judging from mine), you replace the blade part with a new one by clipping it into the backer. The backer keeps the blade ridgid and that's the one to get.

My 2 bits.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I think I'd use a Japanese saw. ...snip...
My 2 bits.
Interesting. I've never used a Japanese saw, but I have been a bit curious lately. Not likely I'll be patient enough to order one in time for this project, but thanks for the nudge.

Rick
 

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In a pinch, there are plenty of hand tools that will do the job...hand saw, miter box saw, jig saw, hacksaw (coarse tooth), pull saw, even a sheetrock saw, etc... Then there's scroll saw, coping saw...oscillating tool plunge cut...

...and probably lots more ideas...

Mind you, there is always a reason to go get another tool.nature of the game... ;)
 
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Discussion Starter #7
... snip...
there is always a reason to go get another tool.nature of the game... ;)
Yes, I am a charter member of that club, as my daughter will attest as I fill the garage with more tools.

Rick
 

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Yes, I am a charter member of that club, as my daughter will attest as I fill the garage with more tools.

Rick

...and if you're a Tim Allen type, there's always the chain saw in the garage... :surprise:
 
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Rick...on a serious note...whatever tool you decide to use, keep in mind that you might create some tear out since you're cutting end grain. Probably not an issue as you'll likely round the edges a bit anyway. If you use the bandsaw you might want to use a blade that has a higher tooth count so you don't tear the bottom. Slight tear out can be sanded but you wouldn't want to chip out a sliver.

For the design, you might not need to cut it wider at the entrance as a bit of rounding on the face edge will allow for easy entry. I would angle the cut to the hole at the same angle as the expected entry angle...this might help to keep it more stable under use.

Good luck...pics are always nice...
 

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I am assuming you don't want to have a rough edge or splintering since yarn of some sort will be pulled through the gap and you don't want snags. The Japanese saw produces a baby butt smooth cut without tearout. The jig isn't necessary, but being something of a fuss budget, I would want the cuts to look and be uniform. You could get the Dozuki saw from Amazon in a day or two. Lowes has an Irwin pull saw that's about half the price of a Japanese saw, but it doesn't have the stiffener. But pull saws don't bind, so it might not matter. The saws have about 22 teeth per inch, slightly more than 1mm each.
 

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One more thing about the Japanese saws. The one with the backer is the one I'd use, but the also come without the stiffener, often with teeth on both edges. Very good at trimming dowels, box joints or dovetails. I take mine with me when doing projects, such as hanging curtains in a commercial window. Perfect for cutting the 1 inch rod.

I also have a little angle cutting jig for it for cutting small strips of trim. (pix below) It was made from a Woodsmith project plan. I used it a couple of days ago for trim added to a picture frame. I'm particularly fond of the cheerful little red knobs, painted with nail polish. Spin the table for 90 and 45 degree cuts in either direction. Knobs are on pins that lock the guide for the exact angle required. Ain't over-kill jigs fun?
 

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How about a plunge router with a guide bushing. Clamp a couple of wide boards along the edges of the hole and pressed against the guide bushing. Router will have a 1/4" bit which will be centered over the existing hole. Spread the boards so that the bit will create a slot that gets wider at the bottom of the slot.
 

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In a pinch, there are plenty of hand tools that will do the job...hand saw, miter box saw, jig saw, hacksaw (coarse tooth), pull saw, even a sheetrock saw, etc... Then there's scroll saw, coping saw...oscillating tool plunge cut...

...and probably lots more ideas...

Mind you, there is always a reason to go get another tool.nature of the game... ;)
Could he use a see saw?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I am assuming you don't want to have a rough edge or splintering since yarn of some sort will be pulled through the gap and you don't want snags.
Actually, this is a brace to hold the frame at angles. Only a 1/4-20 bolt will go through the slot, no yarn or fabric. At least not intentionally. Recall this photo.


The Japanese saw produces a baby butt smooth cut without tearout. The jig isn't necessary, but being something of a fuss budget, I would want the cuts to look and be uniform. You could get the Dozuki saw from Amazon in a day or two. Lowes has an Irwin pull saw that's about half the price of a Japanese saw, but it doesn't have the stiffener. But pull saws don't bind, so it might not matter. The saws have about 22 teeth per inch, slightly more than 1mm each.
Turns out I'm headed for Portland, OR tomorrow for four or five days. I'll have access to three woodworking specialty stores. I should be able to find a decent saw there. Thanks for the suggestions.

BTW, I really like your miter jig. I may have to make something like that. I've been using a small Xacto one meant for sawing balsa from my RC airplane days.

Rick
 
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I have this one: https://www.amazon.ca/Shark-Corporation-10-2315-Carpentry-15-Inch/dp/B00004TBQ0?SubscriptionId=AKIAILSHYYTFIVPWUY6Q&tag=duc12-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B00004TBQ0 and this one: https://www.amazon.ca/Shark-10-2205-Trim-Detail-Double/dp/B000078ONO?SubscriptionId=AKIAILSHYYTFIVPWUY6Q&tag=duc12-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B000078ONO Either one are good. The double edged one is coarse on one side for cutting lumber and the fine toothed side is good for using on trim and with the miter jig. For cutting dovetails it's better to have one with a spine stiffener.
 

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Portland. You live near several relatives of mine. Thanks for pointing out what you were doing, I somehow thought you had a number of holes to cut. That cut will be easy, but I'd still use a guide of some sort to brace the saw. Don't get over aggressive, sharp hardly describes a Japanese blade and it slices through wood really fast, 2-4 strokes will likely do it. Have a good trip.
 

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rick PMd me for the pull saw miter box in the pix above, but I thought the link should probably go up here as well. It's on the woodsmith site and copywritten, so I'm not going to post it. Plan price is $13. I recommend making it from Baltic Birch or the best big box ply you can find. Make sure it is flat Flat FLAT. A half sheet of BB will be enough with leftovers. You need a band saw and a circle cutting jig for it (easy), or a circle cutting jig for a plunge router.

https://www.woodsmithplans.com/plan/pull-saw-miter-box/

I make lots of picture frames for my wife's art, and am adding decorative trim, so I'm using this jig more and more these days.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I don't even have the saw yet and I bought the plans. Includes a short article (from the same issue?) on how to use the saw and a one-page note about how to cut circles on a bandsaw.

Rick
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I visited Woodcrafters, Rockler and Woodcraft stores today. I found an air fitration unit that I will buy tomorrow before heading home (Supermax). I was about to buy the comparable Jet model but this one has electrostatic built in and the Jet is another $50.

I will be interested to see how it does. My pattern making friend said for my space I need two of them. Things have been cold in my area lately, as they are every winter. I have a ceiling mounted electric heater (24000 BTU or so) in my garage that I had installed prior to my first winter there and it got to -16F for two weeks, but I wasn't trying to work out there then. My metal working machines moved in, in Feb. so I did need it heated. It also gets hot there in the summer (100+), so prior to my first summer there, I had installed a split-type heat pump. With the two of them combined, I have no problem keeping my shop comfortable at 68-70ºF all year.

I have noticed however, that there seems to be quite a bit of heat hovering above head level in the winter. I was already thinking of getting a fan for circulating that hot air throughout the shop and maybe take some load off the heating units. I am wondering if and hoping it works that an air filtration unit will effectively break up that warm layer and circulate it around the shop. Seems reasonable to me as the product info says it will circulate the air volume in that sized space up to 22 times/hour. I plan on a ceiling mount.

I also found Japanese saws at all three stores, of course. I bought this Razarsaw, normally $50 on sale for $25. It has a slightly curved tip which is for cutting into panels inside the edges, which I don't anticipate, but it gets me with a saw to find out how I like them. I think I will and if I don't like the curved tip, I can get a straight replacement blade for $25-30.

Rick
 
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