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I feel there must be turners here to answer this. I know that I see ads all the time for the new carbide wood turning tools, where the handles are basically the same but they have the round, square and diamond shaped replaceable tips. I've done some turning but not much. I'd like to do more and think that having tools I don't need to sharpen with help me. My question concerns brands. I think Easy Wood Turning tools developed this technology...so would I be better off buying that brand of should I go with the Rockler knock-off version and save some coin? Thanks for reading this and I look forward to your views.
 

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I'm a turner wanna be but I'm sure someone will give you some good input.
 

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Theo
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When I had my lathe I just bought some Harbor Freight turning tools, figured I'd practice turning, and tool sharpening, until the tools wore out, then get some higher class ones. I sharpened them on a small bench sander, which did a great job of sharpening, in a short time. Never did wear those tools out. Sold them with the lathe when I figured out all I wanted to make on a lathe was carving mallets. If I get another lathe, I'll opt for HF tools for it again. But, your dime, buy what makes you happy.
 

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I feel there must be turners here to answer this. I know that I see ads all the time for the new carbide wood turning tools, where the handles are basically the same but they have the round, square and diamond shaped replaceable tips. I've done some turning but not much. I'd like to do more and think that having tools I don't need to sharpen with help me. My question concerns brands. I think Easy Wood Turning tools developed this technology...so would I be better off buying that brand of should I go with the Rockler knock-off version and save some coin? Thanks for reading this and I look forward to your views.
I personally would buy the more in expensive set and use them until I figured out exactly how much I use the lathe. My lathe sets Idle 90% of the time so My HF set works fine just have to sharpen but not a big time consumer to just touch up. If I used it more I would not hesitate to buy the more expensive set or at least the most commonly used ones.
 

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I feel there must be turners here to answer this. I know that I see ads all the time for the new carbide wood turning tools, where the handles are basically the same but they have the round, square and diamond shaped replaceable tips. I've done some turning but not much. I'd like to do more and think that having tools I don't need to sharpen with help me. My question concerns brands. I think Easy Wood Turning tools developed this technology...so would I be better off buying that brand of should I go with the Rockler knock-off version and save some coin? Thanks for reading this and I look forward to your views.
I personally would not buy the more in expensive set and use them until I figured out exactly how much I use the lathe. My lathe sets Idle 90% of the time so My HF set works fine just have to sharpen but not a big time consumer to just touch up. If I used it more I would not hesitate to buy the more expensive set or at least the most commonly used ones
 

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My suggestion is a bit different but I'd look for a local turning club and become a member if you're really interested. I'd also avoid buying sets as often they will have tools you won't need or use much like some router bit sets. And some of these clubs actually have a lending library that includes tools as well. The club I belong to is an hours drive away and hosted at the Woodcraft store. Of course for the time being meetings are via Zoom but the library is till available and this club has well over 100 members to query my questions through. Check this link for local clubs and information.
 

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You'll find that the old expression about owning a lathe is true. The lathe is only the beginning. I recently sold mine because I moved and I couldn't take it with me. It weighed upwards of about 800 pounds. The Easy wood chisel is made in The U.S They are far easier to use than normal chisels. Sharpening one is as easy as switching out the cutter heads. Sharpening a regular chisel takes both a jig and a good stone and grinder. The jig is over $100 and the stone I used (a CBN) was almost $200. Then there was the learning curve. I think that is the reason that a lot of people give up on turning. They simp[ly can't get a good cutting edge. If you go to the Easy Wood website you can see them in action. They are expensive but they last a lifetime, unlike traditional chisels that get shorter as you sharpen them. I had and still have both sizes of the chisels. I have them for sale on Craigslist. If you are interested just let me know. I also have a set of regular chisels as well as other turning items.

Easy wood lathe chisel - tools - by owner - sale (craigslist.org)
 

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Theo
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Sharpening a regular chisel takes both a jig and a good stone and grinder. The jig is over $100 and the stone I used (a CBN) was almost $200. Then there was the learning curve. I think that is the reason that a lot of people give up on turning. They simp[ly can't get a good cutting edge.
Not my view on it. I use just my small bench belt sander. Learned long ago that tools like lathe tools are constantly changing the angle the cutting edge is to the work, so it does not need an exact angle. Close enough is good enough in this case. Yes, a jig should be used for sharpening a plane blade, because it always cuts at the same angle. But with a lathe tool I take about 10-15 seconds to touch up the cutting edge, and just try to get it close to the original angle. I got this from a famous master furniture maker, many years ago. I do the same thing for wood chisels. My little belt sander was bought at Harbor Freight probably $30 something, and probably over 20 years ago. Still works, still use it.
 

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Not my view on it. I use just my small bench belt sander. Learned long ago that tools like lathe tools are constantly changing the angle the cutting edge is to the work, so it does not need an exact angle. Close enough is good enough in this case. Yes, a jig should be used for sharpening a plane blade, because it always cuts at the same angle. But with a lathe tool I take about 10-15 seconds to touch up the cutting edge, and just try to get it close to the original angle. I got this from a famous master furniture maker, many years ago. I do the same thing for wood chisels. My little belt sander was bought at Harbor Freight probably $30 something, and probably over 20 years ago. Still works, still use it.
Well, remember the old television sets. You didn't realize how much they had deteriorated until you bought a new set. Try a new chisel with the factory edge and you will wonder how you ever could have used the old tool. The biggest complaint from new turners that I have heard was that they couldn't get a sharp edge. Not only does it make a lot of people give up it can also be extremely dangerous. For those that don't turn get a brand new saw blade, even a cheap one and use it to cut a piece of hardwood. Then try your old blade on the same piece of wood. You'll find it night and day even if your old blade is an expensive well-known brand. Unlike a saw blade, lathe chisels do best on green wood. But how many new turners know this and how many people, in general, have piles of green logs laying around. So they head off to the fire wood pile and pick up a piece of maple or oak that has been there for a year or two. Then they go at it with their brand new chisel. Within a few minutes, their brand new chisel is dull so off to the old grinder they go. one touch and the angle is off as well as the temper. Without the proper angle, you can't cut and without a lot of experience, you can't get the proper angle. That is why even experienced turners use jigs like the Wolverine. But they are expensive so newbies avoid buying them. They also avoid buying the correct wheel for their grinder as well as the correct speed grinder. All of these things lead to a lot of lathes being pushed off into a corner never to see the light of day. I know several people that use a sander for sharpening their chisels. Both hand and lathe. They also use them to sharpen their hand planes. So whatever works as long as it really does work is all that matters.
 

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So whatever works as long as it really does work is all that matters.
Part of my signature used to contain a bit that told people that just because I do something, that does not mean that they should. Different backgrounds, different experience, what works for me may not work for you. Or something along those lines.

I've worked wood for many years, and not about to change the way I do a lot of things, blade sharpening included. But am always open to change, not that that means I will change, but open to it, do change at times, and always learning. If I buy a new saw blade, I hang the old one up, until I can think of something to make, or do, with it. I will likely be buying a few new tools, hand tools, not power, fairly soon. On the other hand, have a air chisel, for metal, but when I get my welder back from my sons, intend to convert it to an air powered wood chisel, should be interesting, and fun. That is another of those, just because I do it doesn't mean you should, things.
 

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On the other hand, have a air chisel, for metal, but when I get my welder back from my sons, intend to convert it to an air powered wood chisel, should be interesting, and fun. That is another of those, just because I do it doesn't mean you should, things.
I would like to see a video of that, maybe for Christmas?
 

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I would like to see a video of that, maybe for Christmas?
Christmas next year maybe. The last time I had access to my welder was about 3 days after I bought it. Then one of my two sons "borrowed" it; that was around 10 years ago. It passes back and forth between the two of them, but bypasses me. I have several other welding projects coming up also, so starting to think seriously about buying another welder, and not telling them.

BORROW. Latin for: Dad will never see this again.
 

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According to the structure, the turning tool can be divided into normal lathe cutter, welding lathe tool, woodturning tools with changeable cutter heads, indexable turning tool, and a complete forming lathe cutter. Among them, the application of woodturning tools with changeable cutter heads is increasingly widespread.
 
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