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A friend was taking down some trees in her yard and wondered if I wanted the Cherry tree. Of course I said
yes. It was 40' to the first big branch. Unfortunately the bottom 32' was rotten. I ended up with a 8' log.
The tree was taken down early fall, I had it sawed up in 5/4 boards and stacked them in my old shop in the
house. I used 4/4 for the bottom sticker with a dato for the 5 ratchet straps and I kept them tight. I ran
a fan during the day, they are now 7% and twisted. I stacked them the way they were sawed, so it seems
like the whole pile on one corner must have lifted off the floor. I wonder if I had turned every other piece
if this would have helped and maybe some weight on top. I used mineral and bees wax on the ends
and the only splitting I got was 2 heart wood boards.
 

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tons of weight on top of the stack would have been the deciding factor...
24/7 air flow...
consistent temperature also...

wet them..
sticker every layer......
add the weight...
 

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The tree may have had twisted grain to start with and there may not have been much you can do about it. In this link you can easily see the twist of the tree in the photos. https://www.helpfulgardener.com//forum/viewtopic.php?t=33733 If the lumber is dried like Stick suggested it may dry straight but it is possible for it to twist later with humidity changes. It may do better if kilned as the heat softens the lignin and once the lignin cools it tends to stabilize to that profile if it got hot enough to start with. It is possible on larger trees to cut timbers and then angle the timbers so that the saw lines up with the grain but there are heavy losses in recovered volume that way. But it's better than nothing if you can't use it otherwise.
 

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I think for the average Joe drying your own lumber isn't a good idea. It takes a lot of knowhow to dry lumber the right way. I am sure you went to a lot of work and expense to dry that lumber and you got mostly firewood.

I worked at one time a flooring mill and even with all their experience they still had things go wrong.
 

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I think for the average Joe drying your own lumber isn't a good idea. It takes a lot of knowhow to dry lumber the right way. I am sure you went to a lot of work and expense to dry that lumber and you got mostly firewood.

I worked at one time a flooring mill and even with all their experience they still had things go wrong.
That is about the only way around here,there is no kilns close by. When we had the Belsaw Mill on the farm we used to just stick it and stack it in an open shed. When we used it it had a mildew on it, but that was gone after the planer, The bottom of the pile next to the dirt had some bug holes in it. But this wasn't furniture lumber anyway.

Herb
 
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