Router Forums banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have two questions:

What's the source & cost of the UHMW being used as a fence on "The Router Workshop" show?

I'm considering using the Router Table to flatten an oak panel which is too large for my thickness planer.

Any suggestions/tips?

Thanks,

Wally
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
639 Posts
Wally,

Check out oak-park.com for a list of their router table accessories. If you're in the USA, click here! If you're in Canada, click here! You will find the table fence you want listed on there web site. Well, I got your first question answered. Can anyone else help him on the second question? Mike? (a.k.a. aniceone2hold) :D
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,934 Posts
Wally, I found the answer to your problem a couple months ago. Its a home built set up for surfacing flat panels. Here is a photo of it. Gee, it even uses a Bosch 1617, my favorite! Now if I can just remember where I found it...
Both Woodcraft and Rockler also carry a limited selection of UHMW. Plan on using your biggest wallet when you go looking.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Boricua, Thanks for oak-park URL

Boricua said:
Wally,

Check out oak-park.com for a list of their router table accessories. If you're in the USA, click here! If you're in Canada, click here! You will find the table fence you want listed on there web site. Well, I got your first question answered. Can anyone else help him on the second question? Mike? (a.k.a. aniceone2hold) :D
=========================================

The www.oak-park.com site is very useful ... THANKS

I found a company here in Dallas that has all kinds & sizes of plastics.

Example:
2" x 12" x 24" UHMW for $54.00 (That would produce a dozen 2" x 24" fences.)

Their URL = http://www.dfwplastics.com 1-800-782-1836

Wally
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Mike for the photo

aniceone2hold said:
Wally, I found the answer to your problem a couple months ago. Its a home built set up for surfacing flat panels. Here is a photo of it. Gee, it even uses a Bosch 1617, my favorite! Now if I can just remember where I found it...
Both Woodcraft and Rockler also carry a limited selection of UHMW. Plan on using your biggest wallet when you go looking.
===========================================

I wonder why I couldn't install a flat-bottom bit and raise it 1/16" on the router table and run the panel back & forth over it?

Wally
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
I have a large pine dining room table that has taken 10 years of children's abuse and needs resurfacing. I was wondering how to do it, if I should use the router or maybe a belt sander.
~Julie~
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
Is the wood damaged or only the finish ? since the table is pine be very careful sanding. If i were doing this i would remove the finish first and then sand by hand with a sanding block. It is very easy to damage a pine table top with agressive sanding (belt or ros with course grit). With a little more info we might be of more help.
regards
jerry
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,934 Posts
Wally, your idea would work if you design a frame to hang the panel on that would both support it and keep downward pressure for good bit contact. The idea behind the jig I sent the photo of is the frame supports the router at a uniform height above the panel. This could easily be customized to fit any size panel. By making passes back and forth over the panel you are working like a milling machine to ensure a uniform surface. Here is the info on the jig:
http://www.woodworkersjournal.com/plans/index.cfm/plan_details/5/61/1641
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,934 Posts
Julie, Have you considered putting a layer of laminate over the pine? A table that see's a great deal of use would benefit from this treatment. Pine is just too soft for everyday wear and tear, unless of course you enjoy refinishing?
Another option would be to replace the table top with one built from hardwood. This would be sturdy and have the beauty of solid wood. The nice thing is you already have the perfect template in the origonal top. Tables with mixed woods can be quite eye catching. If you are not comfortable with building your own top you can purchase table top parts from a company such as Van ***** Restorers. They carry everything such as tops, aprons, sliding support mechanisms, legs and any associated hardware.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
I love the pine top on my harvest table. When I bought it the woodworker who made it told me that it was soft and with 3 kids, wouldn't hold up long. I didn't care. It's gouged and scratched (not just the finish, Jerry), from years of kids banging their utensils on it, colouring, doing homework, reading the paper, etc. We sit around the table all the time, like the old fashioned country kitchen... it's the center of our home. So, just thought it's time to spruce it up a bit (no pun intended). I don't want to cover it, or use hardwood. Love pine and the knots! It's 1 5/8" thick, 42" wide by 76" long and made with 10 pieces of pine of varying widths from 2" to 5 1/2".
Any further ideas?
~Julie~
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,934 Posts
Julie, another approach would be to fill in the deep gouges with hot melt lacquer sticks. You can find these in colors to match your finish. You then use a graining pen to draw the missing grain, seal it with a coat of lacquer and you are done. Rockler carries a limited supply of these items, the best source would be Mohawk. Mohawk offers a complete line of professional refinishing products. Having used them I highly recommend them. I repaired a 3/4" deep by 3/4" wide gouge 8" long that tapered to a scratch on a triple length oak dresser using their products. The repair was invisible.
http://www.mohawk-finishing.com/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Wally Woodpecker said:
I have two questions:

What's the source & cost of the UHMW being used as a fence on "The Router Workshop" show?

I'm considering using the Router Table to flatten an oak panel which is too large for my thickness planer.

Any suggestions/tips?

Thanks,

Wally

Using the router table might smooth the panel but it would still not be parallel with the other side if it isn't now. There ia a simple jig in the most recent issue of WOOD magazine that might work. Your planer will smooth out one side but it still wouldn't be the same thickness all the way across the board. You will have to flatten it with a hand plane which requires some experience or rip it into boards then joint one side and one edge then run it thru the thickness planer. You will still have to place the side you edged against your saw fence and trim the other edge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
I'd use a good belt sander and get it to the point I wanted then use a 5" orbital to get rid of the marks. After that add several or more coats of a good quailty poly and it will be qood for quite a while. The poly will help it stand up to water and punishment. I'm with you paint or anything that hides my wood is.... well just wrong!
Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Source for UHMW

I bought several lengths of UHMW from Garland Manufacturing in Maine. They extrude the material in a bright/caution yellow, which seems like a good idea for safety in my shop. I also made a herringbone and several pushers out of it. Garland is online at http://www.garlandmfg.com


Wally Woodpecker said:
I have two questions:

What's the source & cost of the UHMW being used as a fence on "The Router Workshop" show?

I'm considering using the Router Table to flatten an oak panel which is too large for my thickness planer.

Any suggestions/tips?

Thanks,

Wally
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top