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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm building a router table top to attach to an old, large, heavy Work Mate that my neighbor picked up for me for $15 at a flea market.

In the past, I have made my own inserts. This time I bought an aluminum, one size fits all. I love it. It's thick and nice and flat.

Any feelings about filling all the unused holes once I have it mounted? Seems to me that there are a lot of edges waiting to catch a work piece.

Any advice is appreciated.

Pete
 

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Congrats on getting an old Workmate. They were nice pieces of work.

Regarding holes in the plate, could you just take a countersink to them to clean off any burrs?

If you still want to fill them, how about countersinking them, then dropping an undersize flat head machine screw into the hole so that it sits below the level of the plate? Then fill above with epoxy and sand flat.

Bryan
 

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Pete, as long as there are no burrs sticking up you should have zero problems with it as is. I wouldn't worry about it. My Shopsmith table had a small mounting plate that was difficult to work with. I installed a Rousseau style plate and there are gaps about 3/8" wide on the front and back sides. As long as you keep the dust cleaned off your wood will not even notice. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the advice. I'll use as is and if as expected I have no problems then I'm done. I like that.

I also think the epoxy solution is very neat. I may not need to use it here, but I've run into some other situations where I needed a smooth, flat, contiuous surface.

This seems like a good alternative to counter sinking exactly to a surface. Go a little deeper and use the epoxy. Also gives ability to use other than flat head fasteners.

Thanks...Pete
 

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Hi Pete, you may not need it in this application but there's an auto body filler that is great for this type of work. It is called 'USC All-Metal'. It is aluminum filled, adheres extremely well, and has no shrinkage. I used it when adding a nose cone and low water pickup on my 140hp bass boat motor. When finished it looked like it just came out of the factory that way, and still looked great years later.
 

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Pete don't fix something that is not broken, Mike is correct and your work will not catch on unused holes, if it does catch then something is sticking up and you could just sand that flat or lay a fine file flat on the surface and just give it a gentle rub. NGM
 

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If I really wanted to be sure to avoid any catches I would just overlay the top with a thin sheet of plywood or some other material. That way if I should ever choose to abandon it workmate as a router table I could return it to its original use when I make my outstanding new router table with all the bells and whistles. lol.
 
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