Router Forums banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
878 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've used a 7 1/4" blade in my 10" Table Saw many times. I'm wondering if there are any reasons I should not do this e.g. more work for the motor, too much speed for the blade, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
go for it...
actually the surface speed of the blade is slower w/ a 7'' blade...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,603 Posts
I've used a 7 1/4" blade in my 10" Table Saw many times. I'm wondering if there are any reasons I should not do this e.g. more work for the motor, too much speed for the blade, etc.
Jim my question to you why would you want to do that? You can get cheap 10" blades that will give you a better cut than a 7 1/4" blade.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
Jim my question to you why would you want to do that? You can get cheap 10" blades that will give you a better cut than a 7 1/4" blade.
use what you have...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
878 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Jim my question to you why would you want to do that? You can get cheap 10" blades that will give you a better cut than a 7 1/4" blade.
What brand(s) of 10" blades are you referring to? The 7 1/4" blades I bought were not cheapos.....I bought them to use for PVC which cuts easily. I've got a lot of 2 X 4's to rip and I didn't want to use my good 10" ripper.....would rather save it for ripping oak, etc. So, I figured maybe get a 7 1/4" blade for the 2 X 4's. Also, blade sharpening services around here seem to be scarce so I would have to mail my good blades out for shipping which would add to the sharpening cost.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,290 Posts
The blade on my 10" Unisaw doesn't go low enough to make the first cut in zero clearance inserts, so I use a 7 1/4" blade in the saw to pre-cut them enough to fit over the lowered 10" blade, then finish the cut with the 10" blade of my choice. I have a different zero clearance insert for each blade. I write on the bottom side of the insert to indicate which blade it is to be used with.

You can use any diameter blade up to 10" if the arbor hole is correct for the saw, but you will be limited in the thickness of the wood that you can cut if you use a smaller diameter blade. I use 8" diameter DADO blades because I never intend to make DADO cuts deeper than about 1 1/2". The reduced mass of the blade is easier on the table saw too.

Charley
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
BJ used to use smaller blades all the time with his TS. As long as the smaller blade has a decently thick saw plate then it will have less deflection than a 10" blade will and that was why Bob used them although I think he was talking more along the lines of 8 1/2" than circ saw size.

As far as effect on the saw, the smaller diameter requires way less torque and power than a 10" blade and add the reduced mass and your saw should just coast along with the smaller blades.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,627 Posts
Weird, I really haven't had any kid of deflection, even in thin blades, in many years. The newer blades may deflect, but they just dont deflect to where they effect anything I make. I simply don't worry about it like I did 15 years ago.



I always use the largest blade or bit I can. This is because at the same RPM the larger diameter spins faster and spinning faster in almost every case gives a better finish.


Even in my under powered universal motor bench top table saws I get the best cut out of 10" blades and only would go to a 7" if the project dictated it.


Using smaller blades won't hurt any saw I ever used.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top