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A replacement scratchplate was required for a mandolin using black plexiglass. Two templates were made, one for the outline shape and another for a guide bush to make pickup opening. The plastic was sawn freehand and made oversize using a washer and pencil. Two side tape was used to mount it on MDF shape. A 1/2" bearing guided standard cutter was used to cut plastic. A climbing cut was used cutting at 20,000 rpm. The pickup slot was made using the template stuck down with tape. A 16mm guide bush was used with a 8mm 2 flute straight cutter. Again a climbing cut was used.
 

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Glad it was successful for you. Any melting noted? Suppose the climb cutting helped.
Nice job and, thanks for posting.
 
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Is climb cutting the way to cut cut plexiglas? I have not cut that before.
 

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I have used my router to round over edges and corners of 1/4" acrylic for making wet/dry filters for marine aquaria with no melting of the acrylic as long as you keep the router moving along the edge and don't let it sit in one place and create friction. This is messy and creates a lot of small plastic shavings that due to static charge stick to just about everything.

I used my jointer to create perfectly flat edges for gluing up the pieces. This will dull your blades and bits faster than wood. With the jointer, I moved the fence to use the blade edge more evenly. I used my table saw with a laminate blade to cut the sheet stock to size.
 
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Whilst I cannot comment on every type of plastic suitable for routing Rich is spot on with his experiences. Gene there should be no melt back onto the cutter as long as there is constant movement between the plastic and the router bit. Don's point about climbing cutting is important. With a climbing cutter it gently pushes away from the cut substrate and allows greater control and less chance of a cutter snatch.
 

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A replacement scratchplate was required for a mandolin using black plexiglass. Two templates were made, one for the outline shape and another for a guide bush to make pickup opening. The plastic was sawn freehand and made oversize using a washer and pencil. Two side tape was used to mount it on MDF shape. A 1/2" bearing guided standard cutter was used to cut plastic. A climbing cut was used cutting at 20,000 rpm. The pickup slot was made using the template stuck down with tape. A 16mm guide bush was used with a 8mm 2 flute straight cutter. Again a climbing cut was used.[/QUOTE]Nice work Dave. Regarding the rectangular cutout in the template, a very accurate way to achieve the cutout is to glue four pieces of MDF together as shown.
 

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