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I just received an email from Infinity advertising a vertical routing
sled. Any plans available for a homemade one? I put together a vertical routing table but haven't used it yet
 

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now we're talking...
that looks easy enough to reverse engineer...
 

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now we're talking...
that looks easy enough to reverse engineer...
When's the last time you needed to run a board across a router bit at an angle for a tapered profile? This reminds me of Titebond's claim of waterproofness. It looks to me like they're trying to sell something of no consequence for $139.
 
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toys...
gotta have toys...
 
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I think it has merit.
I made the analog, that is, a stationary holder platform that can hold
the work on end. (To a degree, the production model from Infinity,
has ~ the same flexibility.) It's in an old (out of print) book of mine:
"Fast Accurate Router Jigs"
But mine works with edge guides so the resultant end cuts are independent of the work's condition or section.
Sample cuts.
 

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Jim,
I made one from odds and ends around the shop. It is designed to hold the vertical member being cut for a lock miter joint. The cutter tends to push the member up and away from the fence and it is pretty much impossible to hand hold the board and guide it through the cut. I made mine to use the existing 8" high fence and the 3/4" groove for holding Bench Dog feather boards. It's adjustable for boards 21/4 to 5" wide but narrower boards can be held with a spacer. The bar across the bottom is a handle that allows applying pressure against the fence and the cam disc helps resist the outward force that the cutter applies to the work piece. The push bar is relieved to accept boards up to 1" thick. The guide rail in the groove is there to resist the upward force of the cutter. It's probably overkill but the top backer piece rides on the top and back of the fence to resist the outward force of the cutter. Both the groove and top edge of the fence as well as their counter parts are waxed to help move the whole contraption carrying the work piece through the cutter. For harder wood I clamp the work piece to the right side member to resist the upward force. It didn't cost $139.00 + shipping!
Regis
 

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I more than like this...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Jim,
I made one from odds and ends around the shop. It is designed to hold the vertical member being cut for a lock miter joint. The cutter tends to push the member up and away from the fence and it is pretty much impossible to hand hold the board and guide it through the cut. I made mine to use the existing 8" high fence and the 3/4" groove for holding Bench Dog feather boards. It's adjustable for boards 21/4 to 5" wide but narrower boards can be held with a spacer. The bar across the bottom is a handle that allows applying pressure against the fence and the cam disc helps resist the outward force that the cutter applies to the work piece. The push bar is relieved to accept boards up to 1" thick. The guide rail in the groove is there to resist the upward force of the cutter. It's probably overkill but the top backer piece rides on the top and back of the fence to resist the outward force of the cutter. Both the groove and top edge of the fence as well as their counter parts are waxed to help move the whole contraption carrying the work piece through the cutter. For harder wood I clamp the work piece to the right side member to resist the upward force. It didn't cost $139.00 + shipping!
Regis
Nice work. Thank You for posting pictures!!!!!
 

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Instead of standing tall pieces upright, seems the better option is to make (or buy) a horizontal router table. This way you have a lot more support for those tall workpieces.
 

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found used one one w/o a motor for 175$
Good deal..It looked to me like the one shown in the link didn't have a motor anyway, did it?

Should only cost a fraction of that to make your own anyway. I'm cheap like that.
 

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Good deal..It looked to me like the one shown in the link didn't have a motor anyway, did it?

Should only cost a fraction of that to make your own anyway. I'm cheap like that.
it does...
 

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Al Thayer was selling plans for a home made lift that would convert quickly to horizontal. I made one of my own design and used it to make some picture frames, There are some major advantages to having the back of your work on the table and running the bit over the top like a pin router would do but from a different angle. http://www.routerforums.com/table-m...outer-lift-something-you-have-never-seen.html
I looked at the four videos that Al has on Youtube for this lift, and that's a really nice setup he has there. While he may not show everything (and I don't blame him for that) there's enough info there to make a similar setup.
 

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For my 'drawer corner lock' cutter I made Ron Fox's vertical push block.

Easy to make, works great and stops end tearout. Made the 4 drawers for my screw storage cabinet with this and, once the bit had been setup and tested on a couple of scraps, the joints were perfect, which for me was amazing.
 
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