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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all....

Im about to embark on a rather large project that requires alot of edge banding of hardwood onto veneered plywood carcasses.
so am looking (finally) into making a jig for my makita trimmer for flushing the banding - up to this point i would either iwng wing it with my wide trimmer base or actually glue the hardwood and flush it in the drum sander before gluing the veneer (which gives it a more streamlined look....but that is another matter.

I have seen two types of general jigs:
first the "horizontal" type where the trimmer body is parallel to the surface of the plywood, usually with some height adjustment and a flush trim bit as in photos below


the other style is the "vertical" where the trimmer body is perpendicular to the ply surface and uses a straight/mortising/surfacing bit as below


the second option seems a much easier jig to build and make stable...but is there a downside? has anyone used both styles and can comment on the pros and cons?

Thanks
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
We dont do it this way in. In the shop we just cut the parts close enough to belt sand or ROS.

If your not use to it, this would be a problem..
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@Rebelwork Woodworking

what you mean is that you cut the hardwood slats close on the table saw? I assume you do that with a vertical auxiliary fence?
I am familiar with that method...havent tried it myself. I assume the main upside is that the production speed is much higher.
how do you manage to cut that close without glitches where you damage the veneer?

M
 

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If the parts are a manageable size (drawer fronts and smallish doors), put a tall false front on your router table fence, with a gap between the bottom of the face and the top of the table that's a little taller than the thickness of the edge banding. Set up a top-bearing trimmer bit with the OD of the bearing in line with the face of the fence and run the part, edge banding on the table and face against the fence, past the trimmer bit. Flip the part and repeat for the other side. Very quick operation if you have a bunch of parts to trim.
 

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@Rebelwork Woodworking

what you mean is that you cut the hardwood slats close on the table saw? I assume you do that with a vertical auxiliary fence?
I am familiar with that method...havent tried it myself. I assume the main upside is that the production speed is much higher.
how do you manage to cut that close without glitches where you damage the veneer?

M
We use thr overhead or planer to get the pieces close enough to thickness, then through the tablesaw to the desired thickness to be applied to the front...

If you don't have a sander or planer you'll have to make the pieces thick enough to remove the saw marks..
 

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I would think if the finished edge is important to you then using the router will give you a better, straighter trim. If the parts are larger (tall) but manageable then the router table with a high auxillary fence attachment could help steady the cutting. Of course the aux fence would need a cutout for the trim bit.
 

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Mike, I am not sure what you are asking? I would imagine the technique you choose would depend on how best to clamp the workpiece, i.e horizontal or vertical. Both directions are vulnerable to a slight tip of the router base, with consequences.
If all the pieces for edging are the same size, some years back a member posted a technique where all the boards were placed on edge, banding side up, and clamped either into endboards with dados, or with spacer pieces between them. That way the router base is always supported by two boards, the bit is vertical, and guided by a bottom bearing. No jigs, no fiddling. Not sure if I have described this clearly enough..
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
@Biagio I understand that part....I am asking if there is anything related to the direction of the router bit cutting edge vs the wood grain or something like that....

When I said vertical vs horizontal I was talking about the router vs the board...not the board vs the ground.


Mike
 

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Ok, I get the question now, but have no answer. Too many variables for my limited experience (type of wood for the edging, grain direction, straight bit versus shearing cut, etc).
Above my pay grade, as they say. You are way ahead of me.
 

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Personally the vertical is a better choice. If you chose to lay board flat and run cutter there is no bearing to guide you, and if board is not perfectly flat you will cut veneer. I have used a rotozuip with 1/4 inch flush fut.
 
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