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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last week end, I build the table and installed a new Triton TRC001 with Router Raizer. Prior to this (Xmas), the router had never been turned on.

Today, I milled the stock and raised the panels you see here for a small project for my daughter.

A few lessons learned:
1) Use quality bits
2) Check tightness of plate screws periodically during panel cutting. I just happened to see one of the plate lock-down screws vibrating loose as I passed over it with a panel!
3) Althought I was hogging out the material in one pass on the panels themselves (a test for the Triton, not as a suggestion for doing business) the Triton wasn't phased - albeit knotty pine. The end grain chew-up on the face was apparent, but a second pass cleanned up most of it (see #1).
4) Who needs a sled for coping rail ends? I used an 8" square pc of ply as a push block and edge protector and it worked just fine. In fact, was doing two at a time toward the end of the run!

I did goof during my initial sample set-up - and was off a quarter inch on the rail/style match-up! You shoulda heard me laughing at myself for such a stupid error while all by myself in the shop!

Anyway, come Monday, I'll do the finish sanding and glue-up the panels.

ya gotta luv woodworkn,
Bob
 

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Hi Bob.

Nice set up and nice panels.

"small project"???? I would call that a major project.

James
 

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Bob really some nice panels. Like James said that is a small project? Great job.
 

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Nice table and the doors look great. What bits did you end up using and do you like em' ?
 

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Very nice panels Bob, please don't feel insulted when I remind you not to glue the panels into the frames, they must be able to move with the weather. Whilst I have never used them, there are little rubber spacers made for the job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
No Glue in panels

No insult taken. Harrysin (you don't know me from Adam!).

I used dried silicon chunks from a diried-out tube of silicon caulking. I cut quarter inch slices thru the tube, then diced up the discs with a steak knife (Shhhh, and don't tell my wife!). I placed two in the rabbits of each rail and style surrounding the panel. One chunk was a little too big and cracked the rabbit that I didn't notice till after glue-up. But it's on the backside of an end panel and if I did nothing about it, it wouldn't be seen anyway.

An interesting design on this project: one of the panels that make up the sides (a two panel design) will be interchangeable from inside the cabinet. It is a cat's litter box house (you put a litter box inside and shut the doors). The animal enters thru a 7x9 "hole" or door in the side and with an interchangeable panel (one with a hole, one without) allowing use as an ordinary pc of furniture (a design my daughter saw). I had every intention of making both sides interchangeable (to choose which side the cat enters from which would allow more furniture placement flexibility), but I forgot to leave the panel out during glue-up! Oh well. To accomplish the exchange, I made a "dato" of the rabbits around the lower panel, except for the bottom rail's. To exchange, you slip one into the lower rabbit and turn two buttons screwed into the styles half way up to lock the panel intp position, and unnoticable from the outside.


Anywaze...... happy woodworkn fella's, and thz for nice comment,
Bob
 

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No insult taken. Harrysin (you don't know me from Adam!).

I used dried silicon chunks from a diried-out tube of silicon caulking. I cut quarter inch slices thru the tube, then diced up the discs with a steak knife (Shhhh, and don't tell my wife!). I placed two in the rabbits of each rail and style surrounding the panel. One chunk was a little too big and cracked the rabbit that I didn't notice till after glue-up. But it's on the backside of an end panel and if I did nothing about it, it wouldn't be seen anyway.

Good idea !

An interesting design on this project: one of the panels that make up the sides (a two panel design) will be interchangeable from inside the cabinet. It is a cat's litter box house (you put a litter box inside and shut the doors). The animal enters thru a 7x9 "hole" or door in the side and with an interchangeable panel (one with a hole, one without) allowing use as an ordinary pc of furniture (a design my daughter saw). I had every intention of making both sides interchangeable (to choose which side the cat enters from which would allow more furniture placement flexibility), but I forgot to leave the panel out during glue-up! Oh well. To accomplish the exchange, I made a "dato" of the rabbits around the lower panel, except for the bottom rail's. To exchange, you slip one into the lower rabbit and turn two buttons screwed into the styles half way up to lock the panel intp position, and unnoticable from the outside.

Love to see pics of this. I've two cats and this sounds an interesting idea to keep the smell down !


Anywaze...... happy woodworkn fella's, and thz for nice comment,
Bob
Cheers

Peter
 

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It really does prove that necessity IS the mother of invention Bob and please remember that we're one big happy family here and my name is Harry.
 
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