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The Router Guys
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Discussion Starter #1
We are looking for "one to three line router tips", which are to be featured on the daily tip rotator. I have about 100 of these but would like to have input from the rest of you.

Our first members tip has been posted on the the daily tip rotator for Oct 26th, congradulations goes to kp91. Thanks for the tip!

Look forward to hearing from you.
 

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The Router Guys
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768 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
ejant said:
Safety tip:

Never leave a table mounter router with the bit raised or uprotected when not in use.
Thanks ejant, this is what we are looking for...more the better.
 

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Put your bits away. The vast majority of router bits have carbide tips. Carbide has a number of advantages; it’s resistant to heat, and keeps an edge longer than steel. Among the drawbacks; it’s very brittle, prone to chipping. Don't leave your bits rolling around loosely in a drawer as they can smack one another and chip - ruining them. Always put them away either in the container you picked it up in, or in a DIY holder which keeps them safely apart.
 

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The Router Guys
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768 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
jdoolitt said:
Put your bits away. The vast majority of router bits have carbide tips. Carbide has a number of advantages; it’s resistant to heat, and keeps an edge longer than steel. Among the drawbacks; it’s very brittle, prone to chipping. Don't leave your bits rolling around loosely in a drawer as they can smack one another and chip - ruining them. Always put them away either in the container you picked it up in, or in a DIY holder which keeps them safely apart.
thanks jdoolitt, good tip
 

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when useing more than one router at the bench, it may become confuseing which plug is to which router. Color code the plug and the router it goes to.
 

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HarrySS said:
I am planning to purchase my first router. What is your recomendation?
I would adviseyou to buy a 1 1/2 HP router to start with, Something like the Porter Cable 690. If you can afford it the have a kit now which will give
you different bases for the same motor unit, ie a plunge base, a fixed base etc. Later on you may get into doing some heavy work, that's when you may
want a multi speed router with more HP. Dewalt also makes some nice routers
like the 625.
Hope this helps, Woodnut65 :cool:
 

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delroy33 said:
when useing more than one router at the bench, it may become confuseing which plug is to which router. Color code the plug and the router it goes to.
Nice one Delroy.
I have a variety of different coloured plugs which help show which tool is plugged in.

Tip. When taking a router out of the table which has a 'no volt release switch' remember to turn the router switch off before plugging in again.

I got caught out by that once and was fortunate that the bit was above the router base.
 

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router bit depth with dovetail jig

When cutting dovetails with a jig the cutter depth is important for joint fit.
I use a bit of hardwood with one end routed to the thickness the bit needs to be and use this on the router base when setting the bit depth everytime.
 

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For a fast and safe bit elevation adjustments on table applications, I actually make no adjustments at all. I initially raise the bit to the final cutting level, and use two (or more) 1/4'' MDF sub-floors, under the work piece. After the first cut, remove one floor piece, effectively raising the bit 1/4 inch.

For multi router owners, lable base plates and collets, so they can find the correct home.

When using round base routers against a clamped down edge guide, don't rotate the router base position on the guide. Often a base in not exactly concentric to the bit.

Matt
 

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Some of these tips need a tune-up

Today I see a tip while reasonable could use a bit of a tune-up.

"The router lends itself to easy pattern cutting (both internal and external). Do not use the outside of the router base to follow a pattern. The base is not accurate and will not centre the bit. Use a properly machined guide that will centre your bit inside the guide. Do not trust plastic guides and inserts."

1) One thing that you do if you want to use the round sub-base is to "true it" yourself, if you have one that is D shaped you use the flat, if it is square you pick a side and use that same side each time on that project. (I have posted insructions how to true a round sub-base.)

2) Do not assume that the hole in the sub-base has been centered on the router, the sub-base must be centered before you use any inserts.....

3) Well made plastic guides and inserts are better then poorly done brass or steel ones and are about as good as most good inserts.

No offense intended to who wrote the tip...... and this is not the only tip I have seen that could use a little work.

Ed
 

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Dailyroutertips

An E-mail to Mark was returned, the subject was the same as title.
Why do I get the following ,"Error reading quote...". This seems to be a web master question, but e-mail returned.
Does everyone get the same message or is it just me? I have site popups allowed'
Bud (trap)
 

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Direction of feed

] Here is a tip I ran across at another form but thought everyone here would like it too,as I have seen many people that get confused with the direction to feed the router

week or so ago, we had a little discussion in our shop about the right way to feed a hand-held router across a workpiece. When it comes to routing along the edge of a workpiece, everyone agrees it's best to feed the router from left to right. This way, the bit cuts cleanly into the wood and won't bounce along the edge. But what about when routing a groove or dado? With wood on both sides of the bit, is there a wrong direction to push the router?

After trying both directions, we found out that yes, there is a correct way to rout a groove. Like any hand-held router operation, the router should move left to right (assuming the fence isn't between you and the router). If the router is moved in the wrong direction, the rotation of the bit can cause the router base to drift away from the fence. When fed the correct way, left to right, the rotation of the bit keeps the base of the router pulled tight against the fence. (Or if you're using an edge guide, the guide is held tight against the workpiece.)

This reminded me of a little trick I learned a while back. Whenever I have to stop and think about the right direction to feed the router, all I do is look down at my right hand. I simply hold my right hand with the knuckles up and my thumb extended out, see drawing. Then I orient my hand so my thumb is pointing to the edge of the workpiece or the edge of the fence. My index finger will automatically be pointing in the direction I need to move the router.

By the way, this also works with a router table, as well. But since the router is suspended upside-down, I simply flip my hand over, so it's also upside-down. This time, when my thumb points to the router bit, my finger points in the direction I need to feed the workpiece, which is usually right to left.

See the attchment for a picture of the discription
 

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