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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ran across this video while searching for something totally unrelated...


It's a bit long but I think worth it...good for both small and larger shops...

Enjoy...
 

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well thought out but sure looked to be high dollar...
I think weight would be an issue..
 

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well thought out but sure looked to be high dollar...
I think weight would be an issue..
Stick, not particularly high dollar. Pine ply is the one type of ply we manufacture locally in South Africa, and even our Shutter-ply would work (I built one of those doors-within doors wall cabinets, loaded with a couple of hundred pounds of tools out of shutter-ply). Not Baltic Birch, you understand, but that is virtually unobtainable here.
The solid pine (non-indigenous to SA) is at the heart of the roofing industry (our walls are masonry), and not much of it is suitable for furniture - grows too quickly, planks twist like hell. If you look at the planks he used, you will notice the width between the growth rings. Those trees would have been harvested at about 20 years. I understand that in the Northern Hemisphere, similar-size tees would take double that time to grow, but the growth rings are much tighter.
 

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True, Bob, but in a one-car garage shop, like mine, I would love to have some bare wall. My workbench is smaller than his, and yet I am constantly bumping into and getting snared on stuff. The bare wall would soon be filled with jigs and templates that lie flat.
 

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But then you could not have the roof system anyway, because unless you had it coming down in the middle of the room (meaning you could not have a bench or machines), the system takes up more space than the wall shelves, and even with gas struts you could never put the same weight on those hoists as you could on a set of wall shelves.
The whole thing is self defeating.
I am even worse off than you, I have a one car garage but roller shutters at each end and I have to have access through the workspace.
Both long walls are filled with shelves.
 

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Closed cabinets and doors over shelving would be my storage method of choice. Keeping sawdust out is a high priority for me, and any open shelving or storage will soon be layered with fine sawdust. It's insidious!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
When I first saw the shop I thought he had a much too large a table smack dab in the middle...then it was obvious that the table hides all the tools underneath. His router, miter saw, etc...

The shelving unit fits his theme of stowaway stuff...

Good job engineering all the pivot points and especially the use of a quick latch and gas shocks to hold the weight when bringing it down.

I have a boat project coming up that will use gas shocks...the forward berth will get a cut-to-size plywood sheet under the mattress to allow access to the storage underneath. To date it is a pain to pull the bed apart just to get under it. The shocks will be 90# shocks to help lift it with the mattress, sheets and pillows on it without disturbing them. My cockpit engine compartment hatches also use 90#'ers...they're big and heavy.

Good comments...his foldup shelves would be good if you just need to get something and put it back up...apparently, that's the way he works...I think I would prefer shelves, or at least, have it come down where it does not disturb a wall with shelves. Having said that, it's not on my priority list for sure...

Thanks for reading...
 
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Strange coincidence but I also watched that yesterday,
But nobody has noticed the really big problem with this.....

In order to be able to lower the panels, you have to keep the walls bare. So why not just put shelves on the walls and save the time and money this costs to build?
What? You can put these anywhere you have overhead structure and no back wall required. I suggest putting something like this above the walkways/aisles. Frankly, with some more sophisticated mechanisms, these could be configured operated via pulleys and that would enable operation from afar. The only serious limitation is the total weight for each unit, but that can be counter-balanced by homemade counterweights (for the budget-conscious of us).
 

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put them in front of the shelving...
BUT!!!
if your roof is trussed.. all bets are off..
mounting them to a truss's bottom chord more than likely compromise the capacity of the truss...
 
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