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Hi Mike

Just my 2 cents,,, bubbles can be nasty and you will need to use some sand paper to take them out but if it's just to get a nice finish, steel wool or burlap works well for me.

Bj :)
 

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wet sand poly?

AxlMyk said:
Is it advisable to wetsand Minwax poly to get a final, smooth finish? Something like a 400-800 grit? I have a few bubbles that I'd like to get out..
Mike I have the same problem. I have been using Minwax Polyshades and when I put the first coat on, it looked kind of grainy with bubbles. I sanded with one of those micromesh pads which I think is about 1000 grit. I haven't wet sanded. It made it a little smoother. When I put the second coat on I put it on heavy so it looks like glass. Now I have to wait until it dries to see if it is smooth. I may try wet sanding lightly if it's not.

Gary
 

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For me, finishing Minwax "Polycrylic", I lightly sand with 320 between dried coats. I don't use steel wool, as the fibers from the wool can be a rust problem for whatever gets lodged in the grain. Bronze wool if you have to use wool. If you get a substantial build with the waterbase, you can wet sand final coat up to 1200 and then rub out with pumice and rottenstone, or some automotive rubbing compounds work also.

For the oil base polyurethanes, the same applies to the sanding and finishing. I try to allow the coat to be wet sanded to be thoroughly dry, as should be the undercoats, for any film finishes.
 

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Mike, Michael Dresdner's method for a satin sheen is to use 400 sefl lubricating sand paper just enough to get off any dust nib's or scratches, then use 0000 steel wool that has been dipped in paste wax and moving with the grain. Apply more wax as a lubricant as needed. Make sure to overlap your strokes. Wipe off with a clean dry cloth, mist with water and repeat with very light pressure on a new 0000 pad to remove any wax build up.
For a gloss sheen use 400, 600, 800, 1200 till it is glass smooth. Buff with a clean damp cloth or buffer and auto rubbing compound. Wipe off any residue and repeat with auto polishing compound.
It is important to remember to wait until the finish has cured to rub it. Water based products require 4 weeks before rubbing. Oil based products require 2 days before rubbing. You can find this and other great answers in Michaels book: Wood Finishing Fixes.
 

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Sand poly

If you have just some small "nubs" and dust spots on your poly finish try "sanding" with a piece of grocery bag on a sanding block.
Believe it or not, the grocery bag will leave a nice smooth surface without dulling a nice glossy finish.
Jim
 

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In spite of my normal method, 0000 wire wool lubricated with Johnsons wax polish which has never failed to bring forth a glass like finish, the more rubbing the higher the shine!, yesterday at the Perth Wood Show I watched a demonstration on finishing by a professional woodworker and teacher of fine furniture making. He had a coffee table top which had been sprayed with several coats of lacquer and had what appeared to be a perfect low sheen finish. he demonstrated how to remove an imagined insect in the finish, stressing that if such a thing happens, don't attempt to remove it whilst wet. he used a piece of 1200 grade wet or dry with some water and rubbed with the grain, assuring us that it was not possible to "go through the surface". After this he went through three grades of liquid auto type abrasives, only two or three drops with a little water and used a random orbital sander putting no pressure on it and wiping the surface and changing the pad between grades. Whilst the finish looked and felt like a mirror, he still finished with a few drops of liquid wax and the final result was breathtaking. What's just as important was the fact that no physical effort was required. I hope this may be of some help, I'm certainly going to try it.
 

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Sanding Poly

Mike,
I am not sure is this is relevant to your question, but here goes. When I was a lad, back in the 50's, my dad had a floor scraping business that he dragged me around to help with. After drum sanding the floor, we applied thinned laquer and when that was dry, a heavy coat of shellac (no poly then). A week later we returned and applied wax to the floor using a circular waxing machine, steel wool and paste wax. That was then buffed with a brush on the waxer smoothing out the fibers and finally a lambs wool pad produced a pretty good shine. I think the same type of procedure can safely be used with poly, although my dad sold the business before we had a chance to try poly. Just another method.

Joe Z
 
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