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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

I am fairly new to routering but have done a fair amount for a project that i've been working on. besides some minor errors that i easily found the cause for i have a major problem which keeps me puzzeled.

i'm not sure how to explain but while using a tool to passer out some circles sometimes the bit "bites" in, ripping the wood fibres apart. this ony happens every quarter of the piece.. it does so with hugh force so there is no way of controling or preventing it.

I have a 6 bit set but for now' i've only used the 6 mm straight flute.
and i've done mainly circles (needed these for my current project).
so i though i got fairly adepted with it, and theses bite ins got "solved" after some "experience". Or so i though. but i needed some new circles,, larger diameter (21cm radius now) and it happened again. so maybe it only happens when routing with new sharp bits??

the bits i have are fom a set delivered with the router makita rt0700cx3j. am doubtfull it is makita but it did seem to be of fair quality. Lets' say it this way. my dull 6mm flute now still routers better then a brand new 6mm flute that came with a set from a friend of mine. but in time i will go and spend money on good bits.

since neither was now an option i choose to use the new sharp 12 mm bit instead of the dull 6mm. I use the router the correct direction (i believe) clockwise.. around the circle. used as much outward and downward force as i could master.
but it just ripped my plate apart. please see images.

can anyone explain how to solve this issue? what am i doing wrong.

Kind regards matthieu
 

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Wait, are you talking about a table mounted router or handheld?
If handheld you should be going from Left to Right, with the blank in front of you, and the router between you and it.
Have you presawn the shape almost to it's finished size...maybe an 1/8" over size?
Are you using a template, and a bit with a bearing?
There has to be some method of preventing the bit from biting too deeply(?)...

More info please, Matthieu.
But you're absolutely correct; it's not supposed to do that!
 

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Matt..
you need a new quality bit...
suggest Freud..

are you using a template or a circle jig and asking the router to do all of the cutting or only trimming to size w/ it??

also learn to ''read'' the grain.. (you have cross/end grain tear out)...
rough cut your circle to the finished sized a lot closer so you have way less material to trim...
you may not be cutting in the correct direction..
you may have to ''climpb cut those sections that are tearing out...
 

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Wait, are you talking about a table mounted router or handheld?
If handheld you should be going from Left to Right, with the blank in front of you, and the router between you and it.
Have you presawn the shape almost to it's finished size...maybe an 1/8" over size?
Are you using a template, and a bit with a bearing?
There has to be some method of preventing the bit from biting too deeply(?)...

More info please, Matthieu.
But you're absolutely correct; it's not supposed to do that!
those burns appear to be pauses...
sloppy circle jig???
 

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Theo
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And I would add, possibly you are going too fast. As the world class router Elmer Fudd once said, "Go Swow, vewy, vewy, swow.".
:laugh2:
I've never done a circle that large, but numerous straight pieces. I also use a 1" template/master when I rout. I found out long ago, the closer you can rough cut to the line, the better off you are. But at times I can't get closer than maybe 1/2", so then it pays big time to just take tiny cuts, slowly, and just a tiny bit at a time. Usually, if I could have rough cut to maybe 1/16" to 1/8", I could have pretty well zipped along.

Oh yes, I would also pick some cheap wood to practice on first, rather than your expensive piece.
 

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John
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to route that particular piece of wood you need to route in both directions part of the circle needs to be routed one way and the rest of the circle easy route of the other direction it depends on which way the grain is running your your tear out you needed routed the other direction.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
@ DaninVan: it's a makita rt0700. so a handheld one and using not a template but a "circle jig" which came with the toolset. seems to be quite stable.

@ Stick486: well as mentioned the bit i used (12mm bit) is a new sharp bit.
I'm askind the router to do all the cutting. slowly dropping the bit every round about a millimeter. But looking at your template.. i've been moving the wrong direction.. i moved clockwise. looking at the template.. this goes anti-clockwise.

About cutting only a trimming. i had bad experieces with that, it acts mostly bad in the parts where the bit isn't fully cutting it's diameter (being economic and starting close to the edge). but this all could be the 'cause by going bad direction. i will have to try it again tomorrow. but i'll go and buy a new flute 6mm tomorrow. i believe 12mm is to big to my liking anyway.

also.. indeed it goes quick.. kinda pulling itself forward. again also likely due to bad direction. but definately not pauzes.
do keep in mind. it is bamboo, hard and difficult material..

@ Joat:
indeed, as mentioned above. likely to fast due to the wrong direction. i'll give it a try on the same piece tomorrow, in the other direction. see how that will work.

Thanks to all of you. kind regards.

Matthieu
 

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John
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Direction

this part need to change Router direction,
THIS IS A CLIMB CUT
 
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I may be wrong as usual but it looks to me besides routing the wrong way on part of the circle you are taking heavy cuts. There are some real heavy gouges so that is what I am basing my opinion on. As others have said cut close to the line as you can get without touching it then take very light passes. Like 1/16" or 1.5875 mm. I had to look that up. :smile: Try once you start to not stop routing until you are finished. If you stop there will be a burn or mark. That is easier said than done. Try doing some practice on something else so you will gwt the feel of it.
 

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Geez I've done tons of circles but with mdf and they all came out smooth as heck. Never tried plywood , but wonder if it would be an issue . I can't get over how rough yours turned out . Makes no sense to me other than a very dull bit or going way to fast. But your claiming your only going down a little each pass and going slow so I'm not getting it
 

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@DaninVan: it's a Makita rt0700. so a handheld one and using not a template but a "circle jig" which came with the toolset. seems to be quite stable.
@Stick486: well as mentioned the bit I used (12mm bit) is a new sharp bit.
I'm asking the router to do all the cutting. slowly dropping the bit every round about a millimeter. But looking at your template.. I've been moving the wrong direction.. i moved clockwise. looking at the template.. this goes anti-clockwise.

About cutting only a trimming. i had bad experiences with that, it acts mostly bad in the parts where the bit isn't fully cutting it's diameter (being economic and starting close to the edge). but this all could be the 'cause by going bad direction. i will have to try it again tomorrow. but i'll go and buy a new flute 6mm tomorrow. i believe 12mm is to big to my liking anyway.

also.. indeed it goes quick.. kinda pulling itself forward. again also likely due to bad direction. but definitely not pauses.
do keep in mind. it is bamboo, hard and difficult material..

@Joat:
indeed, as mentioned above. likely to fast due to the wrong direction. I'll give it a try on the same piece tomorrow, in the other direction. see how that will work.

Thanks to all of you. kind regards.

Matthieu

@Stick486:.. after that much burn and as abrasive as bamboo is I'd seriously doubt it's sharpness...
yes, counter clockwise is the direction you want to cut....
going the wrong way and the direction bit spin is causing the ''pull''....

cut as much waste away that is possible and clean up w/ the router..
get another bit...
 

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John
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@ Rick
here is a picture ( the grain changes on the down hill lifting the grain)
 

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another thought...
the bottom side splintering is from ''break out''...
the cutter didn't extend far enough below the bottom of your disk...
 

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@ Rainman 2.0
MDF is indeed simple as hell. done some routing there too, no grain so no issue. bamboo is VERY splintereym hard and oily. specially compared to MDF. totally different spectrum. but that is the issue. i did plenty disk this same way. perfectly in bamboo. just with the 6mm bit.

but i'm feeling a bit confused. seems like there is some contracting information or i'm just understanding it wrong.

Some people say to go full circle counter clockwise. other people say to go two directions (half / half? or per quarter? ) also.. not to stop. but how can i not stop if i need to drop the bit for the next movement or not do circles in one go. even with years of practise i just can't imagine how to do that in one go without stopping.
also dropping the bit for the next level. I can't do that while moving. specially as the router is shortly "loose" in it's mounting during the mm drop.

anyway. i'll go and try out some more on this allready wrecked piece
but please explain more on the bit per bit issue and counter clockwise.

Kind regards

Matthieu
 

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go full depth...
start at the section you want to go clockwise and start there at it's top side...
do the the CW cut as far as you need to and w/o really truly stopping change direction and go full circle CCW...
slow cutter speed and slow easy travel = more burn....

do you have a jigsaw or a bandsaw???
 

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John
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@ Matthieu
it doesn't make any difference which direction you go when your dealing with grain somewhere on the circle the bit is going the wrong direction and lifting the grain, causing tear out.
it is all about bearing rotation
 

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Doin' The Jig

@ Matthieu
it doesn't make any difference which direction you go when your dealing with grain somewhere on the circle the bit is going the wrong direction and lifting the grain, causing tear out.
it is all about bearing rotation
John; he's not using a bearing bit, or if it is it isn't a factor. He's using an accessory circle jig (beam compass style).
Creeping up on the final circumference should be straightforward.
 

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John; he's not using a bearing bit, or if it is it isn't a factor. He's using an accessory circle jig (beam compass style).
Creeping up on the final circumference should be straightforward.
he's using a plunge ½'' straight bit...
 
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