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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone identify these tools? They were made by Stanley. Model number was 04118. I couldn't find a hit to that number, even on Stanley's website. Nor did I find a hit to the patent number #3,656.521 The only idea I can come up with is for removing broken screws and the owner says that the cutting edges appear to be for counter clockwise cutting. I'm hoping someone has actually used them before or seen them used. I suspect that they may be a few decades old.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Do you know how well they worked? I would have expected the centers to be hollow rather than the S pattern in these. Maybe the screw shank was meant to wedge in the S but that would seem to throw them off center then.
 

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Thanks Harold. The 04119 was a larger size of the same tool. Quite the odd duck as tools go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm going to make a few guesses about them. 50 Years ago routers were only JUST starting to catch on. They were still pretty uncommon. Not that many people I knew had a table saw either both for cost reasons and a place to put them. So this tool would have taken the place of a dado or a router for making grooves. The stop collar would have taken care of the depth. Maybe you could run them along a straight edge. I'd have to try one to see if that's possible. I had never seen or heard of them before either Herb so I'm also guessing that they may not have made it past the 50s.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Some of the old stuff worked pretty good but there wasn't enough of a market or it required some skill to use. Hand planes are a good example. Lots of people bought them but didn't know how to set them and in particular didn't know how to sharpen them so they fell out of favor. Then diamond sharpening tools, white friable wheels, and other tools for sharpening starting becoming common around the late 80s and planes are now a big deal again. Card scrapers are another. I don't remember ever seeing any when I was young but they are common now and I use mine all the time. Maybe these work better than it looks like they do. I'm tempted to get them just to find out. Plus just having one would be kind of neat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
A picture I saw of the packaging said to run them along a straight edge Paul. I'm curious just how easy that was to do.

I didn't take industrial arts back then Dan but I had friends whose Dad's were woodworkers and I never saw them around their shops.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for the testimonial Biagio. I was hoping to hear from someone who actually used one. If you want to post the info that came with yours I think many of us would be interested in reading it. You confirmed most of my suspicions about using it but I wouldn't have thought you needed that much power to run it. I find it fairly odd that so far you from South Africa and Harold from Australia are the only two with first hand knowledge considering that it was made I think in Connecticutt, USA. It seems that it was made in two sizes, the 04119 in 3/4" and the 04118 which was 1/2". According to one site's info they sold for $5.25 and $5.50 in the US at the time of manufacture which was 1973 according to the account I read. That may have been the only year they made them. I didn't find any further reference's after that. I saw where one had sold at action for $14 but it was still in the original package and the package was in pristine condition so it's mostly a novelty type collector's item it seems. I'm a bit of an oddball myself so I like unusual stuff like this.
 
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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Thanks Biagio. I'm not sure which page is page 3 but I have a metal cased B & D 1/2" drill. It was given to me a couple of years ago with a broken chuck. I replaced that and it still runs like a top, only slow and non reversible. I use it for mixing mortar, drywall compound etc. It has the power that my other drills lack. It comes from that era you talked about when B & D tools weren't a joke. I have one of their 7" angle grinders from the same era and it's a workhorse too. That may be why we didn't see some of the tools you mentioned. Ours were pretty good and would have been a lot cheaper.

Generally S4S 1" is still 3/4" finished but they can vary a bit. Back when you were using the electrichisel common practice was to saw the lumber and then let it air dry either completely or for a good while before going into a kiln. I think that wood was probably more stable that what we have now where it gets sawn and then into a kiln within a few days. Moisture content varies considerably depending on both where the lumber came off the log and where the lumber was in the kiln, that is top or bottom of a pile and inside or outside. It then goes to the planer and if the MC isn't stable then it can finish drying to a slightly smaller size after planing.

I would be interested in having it Biagio. I like old oddball tools. I have one hammer drill/drill combination that might run it. It's 2500 rpm in drill mode but I don't know if it will have enough torque. I saw sharpening instructions in the pdf so I can do that. Pm me with what you want for it and we'll exchange info. And thanks. BTW, did you ever see the thread where I posted pictures of something that looks like a chisel but isn't? No one has ever said they actually have seen one of positively knows what it is, including the staff at the local Lee Valley store. There are good pictures n post #17. I got it from a seller in the UK with 8 other tools that were chisels. https://www.routerforums.com/what/124025-chisel-2.html
 
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