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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This one is easy so just to make it interesting you have to tell us about it and who made/makes it. If you can tell me the maker and the number of the tool I will add 25 points to the 100 you get for being the first correct answer....

Let's go over this again, 100 points for the first one who tells us what this tool is for or how it used AND who makes/made it. If you are the winner and you included the model number I will add 25 points to the win.

Good luck!

Ed
 

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#271 Router plane, 3"L, 1/4"W, 3/8lb, 1926-1973.

A handy, small router for light work. It's one of Stanley's better ideas, which gained favor from those doing inlay, mounting small door hardware, etc. The plane is a flat, rectangular casting, with a vertical portion at the midpoint that is used as a grip and to secure the cutter (by means of a simple slotted screw). There are two positions on which the cutter can be attached to the main casting. One position allows the tool to be used for normal work, and the other position for bull nose work.

Some guys would mount a block of wood on the tool by tapping holes through the casting (in the vertical portion, where you grip the tool), and then screw the wood to the casting. This after-market option was done so that a better grip could be had on the tool.

The plane is nickel plated, and is still manufactured over in England. A short production of japanned models was offered during WWII. These are very scarce, but no one, as yet, cares.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Snowshoe said:
#271 Router plane, 3"L, 1/4"W, 3/8lb, 1926-1973.

A handy, small router for light work. It's one of Stanley's better ideas, which gained favor from those doing inlay, mounting small door hardware, etc. The plane is a flat, rectangular casting, with a vertical portion at the midpoint that is used as a grip and to secure the cutter (by means of a simple slotted screw). There are two positions on which the cutter can be attached to the main casting. One position allows the tool to be used for normal work, and the other position for bull nose work.

Some guys would mount a block of wood on the tool by tapping holes through the casting (in the vertical portion, where you grip the tool), and then screw the wood to the casting. This after-market option was done so that a better grip could be had on the tool.

The plane is nickel plated, and is still manufactured over in England. A short production of japanned models was offered during WWII. These are very scarce, but no one, as yet, cares.
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
Winner
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

Now that is a lot of details! Have you been over to visit my shop when I didn't know it? You sure seem to know alot about my tools.......

I had no idea that any came from any where but England.... I got mine from a close out back in about '73, I forgot the low price but it was like half of what it had been selling for.....

So lets see I guess you will be getting the full 125 points.......

Ed
 

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reible said:


Now that is a lot of details! Have you been over to visit my shop when I didn't know it? You sure seem to know alot about my tools.......

Ed
Ed,
Nope, haven't been snooping around your shop... :D You just seem to have a lot of tools that I have either thought about purchasing, or have needed at one time or another.
 
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