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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was just checking and if my addition is right the items I have listed here on "What is it?" have generated 5954 points to the winners! As luck would have it I still have more points to give away.

Now this is not a very hard one but make sure you give a good complete answer of what it is or how it is used. I want someone who doesn't know what these are to know after reading your answer.

Good luck and for the first good complete answer you will be the winner and get 100 points.

Ed
 

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The items are called french curves. They are used commonly in drafting to produce curved lines that aren't truly circles. The same principle is used in woodworking. You can create curvy flowing lines (pehaps for a template) with them. I believe it is customary to join two geometric (straight line, or arc) shapes using it. Place the desired curve at one point, and trace the contour towards the other point.
 

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Yes they are "french curves" made to "best fit" a curved line through "points" which cannot be defined as being a true arc (that is, having a common center point). Place the "french curve" along the set of "points" until as many points as possible line up with one of the edges on one of the selected "french curves" and "draw" the line. Of course if one of these won't work because you "points" are spaced further apart than would be encompased by one of the "french curves" you can always reach for that broken band saw blade and fit it through the "points" with the little lady's help. A plastic covered "lead snake" can also be found in the "sources" which will provide almost an infinite number of solutions, and "stay put" so you can have a "go / no go" look at your best fit before scribing the line.
steveo
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
presumed_druid said:
The items are called french curves. They are used commonly in drafting to produce curved lines that aren't truly circles. The same principle is used in woodworking. You can create curvy flowing lines (pehaps for a template) with them. I believe it is customary to join two geometric (straight line, or arc) shapes using it. Place the desired curve at one point, and trace the contour towards the other point.
I think this is a good description and worth the points but also check 3 response from steveo for even more details. And as was pointed out cans, plates, bandsaw blades, and a bunch of other shop/house hold items can be used to create those flowing curves you want.

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