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Discussion Starter #1
Some are hard and some are easy. This falls on the easy side. So let's see what you know about this item. First tell us what it is, how it used and then tell us some thing about where things are stored........ So to recap you need to answer three questions to win.
1) What is it?
2) How is it used?
3) Storage area?

Remember we want details.

100 points for the first person to answer all three parts in one message with correct details.

Ed
 

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What is it #74

reible said:
Some are hard and some are easy. This falls on the easy side. So let's see what you know about this item. First tell us what it is, how it used and then tell us some thing about where things are stored........ So to recap you need to answer three questions to win.
1) What is it?
2) How is it used?
3) Storage area?

Remember we want details.

100 points for the first person to answer all three parts in one message with correct details.

Ed
I think that is a push drill with the stop\rage area in the handle for bits. This is where I wish I'd have paid attention when my Dad was talking to me. I think he used it to pinhole marks in the wood before the dowel holes were drilled on the drill press.
 

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What is it #74

cabinetsetc said:
I think that is a push drill with the stop\rage area in the handle for bits. This is where I wish I'd have paid attention when my Dad was talking to me. I think he used it to pinhole marks in the wood before the dowel holes were drilled on the drill press.
I think I should have been more explicit. The bit storage is in the handle. To access the storage you unscrew the ring ahead of the handle and it slids toward the tip. The butt end remains in place. Gosh I wish I would have listened. Rick
 

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1) What is it? Yankee push drill

2) How is it used? Insert bit in the working end, the collar pulls away from the use. Point the bit on the workpiece and push. Work in and out to drill. The bits work like a scoop bit.

3) Storage area? In the handle end and I believe there are eight bits
 

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Warm, warmer, it is a contractor grade Yankee push drill. Home owner grade Yankee's had clear and red plastic handles. In addition to drilling holes these drills were the fastest mechanical advantage screw drivers on the market. Forward/lock/reverse made life simple. In close quarters you still cant beat them. I grew up using an origonal version with the wood handle, still have 2 of the home owner grade around for small jobs.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You people are good!
The model pictured is a newer one made by Klein Tools No.64002 8 bits stored in the handle, accessed by turning the top screw and lowering the handle. I also own two "Yankee" No. 41's one without the Stanley Tool referance, a Miller Falls No.188A and a Goodell Pratt (my granfathers pat'd dec 1915). The first three have ball detent/half shaft holders while the last two have a split chuck with bit stoage by means of a cap the is unlocked then twisted to access the bits. None of them has the ability to use a screwdriver or any reversing method.

Since everyone of the three posters did so well I'm giving a triple award and points to each of them. Keep up the good work!

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