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I have heard that people wax their jointer surface and wondered what wax you use? Would a car polish work as well? How do you clean the surface first?
 

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use a paste wax like Johnsons or Minwax. I use minwax. It's great for all sorts of things like waxing runners, glue cauls (to preven sticking), screws go in easier with a little wax.

If there is no rust, just wipe it down. If light surface rust then steel wool, scotch brite pads or fine grit sand paper. I'd try scotch bite first.
 

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Can't beat good old Johnson's Paste Wax.

HJ
 

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Keith; NO! to the auto polish.
In all likelihood it contains Silicone...bad things happen to your wood finishing if the wood comes into contact with Silicone.
Paste furniture wax is what you're looking for. In the scheme of things, Carnauba wax is the most desirable and your furniture paste wax likely has it as one of the main ingredients. It's a very hard wax.
 

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I have heard that people wax their jointer surface and wondered what wax you use? Would a car polish work as well? How do you clean the surface first?
car wax has silicone in it and you will regret having it your shop for it will screw up your finishing ...

there is more written here on waxing your tools than you can believe...

the search function is your friend...
 

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I use Johnsons paste wax for metal table tops but if you want the very best buy Renaissance wax. I save my Renaissance wax for my handguns and rifles.

Robot Check
 

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John
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Johnson paste wax for me
 

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Put me on the list for Johnson's as well. Had very good luck with it.
 

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Johnson's paste wax for your tables and tools...
You can add Briwax, Black Bison, Behlen, Trewax and Mohawk to the list of acceptable waxes...
If they contain Carnauba wax they will finish harder and be longer wearing/lasting...
You can even add more Carnauba if you want...

Carnauba Wax | Park Beekeeping

Wax applied to a warm surface is a big plus...
Mechanical polishing over hand buffing is way better.. (elcheapo car buffer or a wool bonnet on your ROS)...
Polishing is what makes the wax work to it's fullest...
More polishing.. Better results...

above all.. make sure it DOES NOT contain silicone...

Wax clean up/removal/thinning is done w/ mineral spirits...
A pound of wax should last way more than a decade maybe even well into the second...
Put it on any tool table surface you have...
Great for plane soles too...
To melt/soften the wax put the container of wax in hot water but not submerged...

Carnauba wax, sometimes also referred to as palm wax or Brazil wax, is a kind of wax that is made from the extracts of palm leaves. These leaves are found on the plant ‘Copernicia prunifera’, a short plant that is usually found in Brazil, especially in the states of Ceara, Rio Grande do Norte and Piaui. Also known as the ‘Queen of waxes’, it is found in yellowish or brownish flakes.

Stick w/ your silicone-less furniture paste wax and avoid possible contamination of your project...

If you are considering candle wax... not all candles are created equal...
You also have to contend w/ dyes in the wax...
Best to steer clear of using candle wax...

Candle making colorants come in a vegetable based block so there is no paraffin in these color blocks.

Candle Wax | Candlewic
Candle Dye, Colors & Pigments | Candlewic

PARAFFIN CANDLES
Paraffin development began in 1830, but manufactured paraffin was not introduced until 1850. It provided an alternative to tallow which gave off an unpleasant odor when burned. In 1854 paraffin and stearin (the solid form of fat) were combined to create stronger candles, very similar to those we use today.

BEESWAX CANDLES
Candles have a wide variety of ingredients, but there are only a few main ingredients that are used throughout most of the world. We will talk about the main types, and the advantages and differences of each.
Most honey and bees wax is collected from July to September. It can come from the pollination of canola, sweet clover or sunflowers. Generally these plants result in a lighter scent and lighter colored beeswax.
There are two types, solid beeswax and honeycomb wax. The solid bees wax candle is created by pouring liquid wax into a candle mold. The result is a smooth, dense candle which burns for an extremely long time. Honeycomb beeswax candles are created by rolling honeycomb textured sheets. The honeycomb candle is less dense and burns faster.
Beeswax candles produce a bright flame, do not drip, do not smoke or sputter, and produce a fragrant honey odor while being burned.

CRYSTAL WAX CANDLES
These are also called wax tarts or wax potpourri. They are made with an all-natural candle wax that holds twice as much fragrance as paraffin wax candles, making them suitable for highly scented candles. They are used with a potpourri warmer (without any water). The fragrance emerges when the candle starts to melt.

GEL CANDLES
Gel candles have a new and unique look. They give off a beautiful illumination and a wonderful aroma. And they burn three times as long as wax candles.
But be careful. Gel candles produce a higher burning flame and they burn much hotter. Too much heat can shatter a glass candle-holder or container which can ignite nearby combustibles, resulting in a room fire. To be safe, never burn a gel candle more than four hours.

SOY CANDLES
Soy wax candles are made from soy beans. They are non-toxic, non-carcinogenic and bio-degradable. They burn up to 40% longer than paraffin candles and burn evenly which means there is no tunneling effect. However, it is not recommended to burn more than four hours at a time. Soy candles are very sensitive to temperature and light. They should be stored away from sunlight, fluorescent lighting and other sources of heat.
 

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as a service tech...
yes...

''TMI'' hell...
you asked...
 

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Stick? You have experience with wax ...:surprise:
as often as this subject comes up like just in the last month or two.....
it's in a PDF now for fast posting...

the PDF is done...
anybody/everybody can now post it...
you get the askers to read it...
thread over before it even hardly got started...

then we hijack/derail the thread as per NOP/SOP...
 
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Stick,

We can't hold a "candle" to you and your vast array of knowledge!

HJ
 

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Stick,

We can't hold a "candle" to you and your vast array of knowledge!

HJ
sure ya can....
lots of subjects are in the know nothing barrel...

how are you on finishing...
no clue here...
not even much of a file...

even worse on CNC...
 

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as often as this subject comes up like just in the last month or two.....
it's in a PDF now for fast posting...

the PDF is done...
anybody/everybody can now post it...
you get the askers to read it...
thread over before it even hardly got started...

then we hijack/derail the thread as per NOP/SOP...
...and now, back to our regularly scheduled thread HI-JACK!
 

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Every time Stick post a pdf, it goes into my Woodworking folder/subfolder. Getting a huge woodworking knowledge base from it. Keep em coming Stick.
 

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I have used Johnson's Paste Wax also. It worked for me somewhat but maybe I did not buff it correctly. I only used a towel. It did not last long. Couple of weeks at best. The light rust always returned. Someone here mentioned they used wax paper. I tried that with much better results. I fold about a 1ft. square into a quarter-fold and buff my table saw with that. It does leave little tiny bumps on the table but it doesn't interfere with anything I do. Just something else to try if Johnsons does not work for you.
 
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