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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been making adirondack chairs with the shape of Minnesota as the back rest. I'm currently using a scroll saw the cut the shape out. The backs are made using 4 1x6 boards. My question is what would be the most efficient tool to use, scroll saw, or a router with a pattern bit. If router bit what style and brands would you recommend.
 

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If it's a cutout, scroll saw gets my vote. However, if it is not, then a router seems the better answer. With four pieces it might be a problem cutting out the shape and still having the back support a person properly.
 

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welcome to the forums N/A

stay w/ the jigsaw..
use the correct blade for the mission...
using the router you'll still need to hog out the design...
however a pattern and a router will give you a cleaner finish..
for the bit...
https://www.freudtools.com/products/42-204


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G'day Douglas, welcome to the forum.
 

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Welcome to the forum Douglas. One of the reasons members are encouraged to fill out their profiles is so that we know what tools you have to work with. I agree with Gerry that a bandsaw is by far the fastest machine to get rid of the bulk of the material. But that isn't helpful if you don't have one. Next would be a jigsaw, if you have one. Routers aren't good at removing large amounts of wood and bits wear more quickly than other cutting tools and are more costly than other methods. However a pattern or flush trim bit is ideal for producing a finished edge (maybe with a little sanding) when following a pattern of the finished profile. So a multi machine approach is probably the best where you use a bandsaw or jigsaw to cut the basic pattern out, leaving 1/16th to 1/8th inch of wood to rout . That will give you a finished product with the least amount of time spent sawing and sanding.
 
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One thing to consider when using a router to trim or cut the ends of boards like you're proposing is that tearout can be a serious issue. You'll probably want to use a backer board.

If you're making a lot of these, I'd make a dedicated template/jig for each board that incorporates a backer board. I'd rough cut themon a bandsaw, or with a jigsaw, and then clean up the ends with the router.
 

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Welcome to the forum Douglas. I am with the group on this. I would say the scroll saw that would take the least amount of material. I cut allot of toys out on the scroll saw using 3/4" material. it goes pretty quick and not much waste. I used to make quite a few rocking horses. out of 1 1/2" stock. I would rough the parts in on the band saw then clean up them up with a router and a flush trim bit following a mdf pattern that I attached with double sided tape. https://www.amazon.com/Freud-Bearing-Flush-Shank-42-114/dp/B0000225YCSend some pics we would love to see it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I appreciate the helpful tips so far. Unfortunately i don't own a bandsaw. I do however have a scroll saw, jigsaw, and a router. I also have a template made for tracing the boards(pictured below), which could also be used with a pattern bit. If I used a spiral flush trim bit(pictured below) would I be able to cut the pattern without trimming the bulof the material first.
 

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SURE...
the bit won't last very long...
be slow too...
 

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Interesting thread. I was in Lancaster, PA last year. The Amish craftsmen have gone from wood to synthetic, colored material for lawn furniture. No paint or finish needed and lasts forever, I was told. Look forward to seeing the finished chair. BTW, tried one and had a hard time getting out of it. Old age?
Edit- Do Colorado instead, much simpler profile.
 

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SURE...
the bit won't last very long...
be slow too...
Plus those bits are expensive. The cheapest alternative would be to use a guide bushing to follow the pattern with a straight bit. Some straight bits have a shear angle on them which will leave either the front or rear edge smoother. Next up would be a compression spiral with guide bushing, a little cheaper than the bearing guided spiral. No matter what you need to cut the piece out close to finished size. Not doing that as Stick said won`t be any faster and it will be way more costly.

Someone else suggested just putting that pattern on a standard chair back where you would use that pattern with one of the various letter bits (vee, round nose, beveled).
That would be the fastest and cheapest.
 
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