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This is a truly embarrassingly funny and displays my ignorance in its full glory about a year ago. This is a conversation I had with a colleague:


Work colleague: With all the woodworking you are doing, have you got a router?

Me: No.

Work colleague: You can borrow mine any time, just let me know.

Me: OK, thanks. I can't think of anything I would use it for.


Today I am cringing at my response, and this after just one use of the router and a week's worth of research into it. Only a total ignoramous could have said what I did :lol:

I look around my house today and I can see a huge number of uses, not to mention every project I have in mind will be a router job.
 

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Round overs, dados, rabbets, flush trim...and the list goes on and on. A handheld plunge router will do well for you. As will a table mounted router...and a smaller one for trimming.

I have two Bosch 1617EvSpk combos, a Dewalt trim router and a Triton mounted under the table. They all get used as the projects dictate. ;-)
 

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But be careful ! Routers seem to multiply like rabbits after you learn what they can do. At last count I have eleven of them.

Charley
:surprise:

But... why? Aren't they all pretty much the same?
I can understand router bits procreating, but routers?
 

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You start with a small router...then you decide you need more power, then one with a better handle design, then a plunge, then a trim router, then a dedicated one for the table .... though not necessarily in that order, and on and on until the next thing you know, you have lots of them.
 

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You start with a small router...then you decide you need more power, then one with a better handle design, then a plunge, then a trim router, then a dedicated one for the table .... though not necessarily in that order, and on and on until the next thing you know, you have lots of them.
Hmmmm.... I see. Well, I am finding the handling of mine a bit .. not quite ....comfortable :lol:

Right now I have higher priorities: like a workbench that I can easily move around so as to avoid increasing my fiber intake by accident while using my hacked IKEA kitchen island :D

It seems routers are woodduststorm generators. The last and first time, I walked away covered in wood dust.

I'm looking at the Ryobi workbench that is height and angle adjustable. Quite affordable. No new routers on my wishlist at this time.
 

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Huh...What!

:surprise:

But... why? Aren't they all pretty much the same?
I can understand router bits procreating, but routers?
Oh, Grasshopper, you too shall learn!

Welcome to the forum...
@Stick486

Isn't it time for the PDF's?

Bill
 

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You start with a small router...then you decide you need more power, then one with a better handle design, then a plunge, then a trim router, then a dedicated one for the table .... though not necessarily in that order, and on and on until the next thing you know, you have lots of them.
This is very true, but when your woodworking abilities become known, some just seem to show up, looking for a new home. There are many different designs and sizes, making one of them just a little bit better for doing certain things that the others don't do quite as well. I also have a couple of old ones that I just can't seem to part with, although I never seem to use them any more. These have been loaned out a few times, but they came back.

Charley
 

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I have two Bosch 1617EvSpk combos, a Dewalt trim router and a Triton mounted under the table. They all get used as the projects dictate. ;-)[/QUOTE]

You're one ahead of me, Mike, unless you count the CNC -- then we're tied!

Like being able to leave the most used bits in a dedicated router.

HJ
 

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:surprise:

But... why? Aren't they all pretty much the same?
I can understand router bits procreating, but routers?
all related to size, capabilities, function and power...

say you are working on a project that requires multiple profiles (shapes)..
let's say 7 for a hutch... can be as few as 3 or 4 or as many as 9...
period pieces can get nuts w/ the profile count...
3 bit built ups w/ more than one setting per bit are other issues all their own...
you load the bits and set them up and don't touch till you are finished w/ the project......
time saved and your fit and finish improved dramatically...
you can eat up some serious time swapping out bits and fit and finish isn't so good...
this '''isn't so good''' thing can eat time and cause a lot of extra work...
and if you ever have to go back and set up a bit again getting it set exactly where you had it before is a chore w/ total success not being likely......
it's nearly impossible for a router to do two different tasks or be in two or more places at once...

if you are working on a commissioned piece after all the fussing you find the bottom line isn't looking so good...
time to expand the router count..

this a satellite shop..
in these two pictures there are 17 routers not counting the RT or the however many are on the truck parked outside the door... 10 - 12 maybe..

.
 

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the PDF's...
at least some to start...

.
 

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@Dan_D - over the past several years, my router inventory grew from one old Craftsman undersized router to the four I have now.

I started with the Bosch combo and built a router table top. I used it in several places - clamped to the work bench, clamped on saw horses, and then attached to the end of the miter saw station. I liked that spot because the working height was higher than any other spot. Working at a comfortable height is much easier on my old back! Keep that in mind as you go forward.

I have all of my tools in a one car garage so everything gets re positioned as needed. Then one day, I had an idea. Well, I have them alot but this turned out to be a good one. I decided to build an adjustable height work table that I could use as a clamping station, and assembly table. The thought of having a worktable 24-26 inches high appealed to me for building cabinets. Then it hit me. Why not include a router on one end? Then I could raise the table to about 39 inches and rout away comfortably. Then another thought hit me. Why not two routers mounted in the table? :surprise:

So, here is a link to my project. It works great for just about anything I do, and frees up my workbench for other things.

Hope you get some ideas that help you out in the future.

Original thread.
Adjustable Height Workstation
http://www.routerforums.com/show-n-tell/46562-adjustable-height-workstation-router-table-more.html

Updated thread
http://www.routerforums.com/tools-woodworking/85809-adjustable-height-workstation.html
 

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nicely, nicely, nicely done Mike...
 

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But be careful ! Routers seem to multiply like rabbits after you learn what they can do. At last count I have eleven of them.

Charley
I am only up to four. I believe this multiplication may be associated in some way with rabbits.
 

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...Right now I have higher priorities: like a workbench that I can easily move around so as to avoid increasing my fiber intake by accident while using my hacked IKEA kitchen island :D

I'm looking at the Ryobi workbench that is height and angle adjustable. Quite affordable. No new routers on my wishlist at this time.
For quite some time I used a 30x60 inch folding table with an MDF top to protect it and give me a flat surface. Worked well and got neatly out of the way. I found a decent workbench at Harbor Freight for about $140. It has a nice end vise and four drawers. I have enhanced it over time. Quite rigid construction.
 
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