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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i use chamfers exclusively to ease edges of tabletops or seat etc (that is NOT for creating miters or multi-gon boxes)

i use a 45 degree cause that is what I have - but have seen some people use 75 degrees to make a "slimmer" looking edge or vise versa - use a steep 15 degree to make edges that are almost vertical

what is the rational? i realize its all about aesthetics - but what is the rule of thumb here?
what angles would you recommend getting for this application?

appreciate your input
Mike
 

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David - Machinist in wood
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I think it's more personal preference than anything else. I use both 60° and 90° for engraving and chamfering. I also have 15° for some inlay work.

David
 

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And I don't use chamfers at all but rather round over bits. Some just enough to break the edge and others much more depending on what "Looks" better to me at the time for that project. My reason for this is that my skin "tears" easily these days and a "normal" square edge can easly tear skin under the right conditions. Practical application and personal preference rule the day for me. Now if I'm making it for someone else then I let them decide their preference. I quit trying to guess what others would like not long after getting married those many years ago...... :)
 

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I think it's a matter of aesthetics, what looks best, for the particular project, the style (modern, traditional), and the style of other furniture in the same room. And it is also a mater of personal preference. Over the last couple of years, more often than not, I use a block plane for chamfering. Took awhile to master it, but it's fast, easy and dust free.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
clearly its all about aesthetics .....
of course i use roundeovers as well

I was referring mostly to large chamfers/bevels/undercuts that are used on table tops or stool tops as in the photo below (not my work - chris solomon )

398347


I might use a block plane for a small project....but realistically creating something like in this photo with a very large chamfer and round edges is better suited to a router...
 

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clearly its all about aesthetics .....
of course i use roundeovers as well

I was referring mostly to large chamfers/bevels/undercuts that are used on table tops or stool tops as in the photo below (not my work - chris solomon )

View attachment 398347

I might use a block plane for a small project....but realistically creating something like in this photo with a very large chamfer and round edges is better suited to a router...
To do something like this I would use a table saw.
 

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Mike, I cannot answer your question about rules of thumb, also have not come across any in my limited reading about furniture styles. I guess it is related to the style -the table you show looks Scandinavian modern, and the undercut adds to the floating, airy appearance. Not sure it would work with older styles, which I relate to better.
A panel-raising bit with a bearing on the end might do the trick, following the curves etc, but might be kind of scary to use handheld. May be more readily available than the special-angle chamfer bit Solomon and his friend use. Also, different profiles available, which may fit better with a less austere style than the table shown.
 

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I agree with Biagio. A raised panel bit would be my second choice over a table saw. But no matter what size the table is you would always be better off using a table-mounted router. It doesn't matter if it was a 12" table or a 12 foot table.
 

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clearly its all about aesthetics .....
of course i use roundeovers as well

I was referring mostly to large chamfers/bevels/undercuts that are used on table tops or stool tops as in the photo below (not my work - chris solomon )

View attachment 398347

I might use a block plane for a small project....but realistically creating something like in this photo with a very large chamfer and round edges is better suited to a router...
We run the same profile bit on a shaper. First considered for a router and then a adjustable cutter was purchase from Amana. FOR ABOUT $250. ITS adjustable depending on tge degree desired but....you can only tilt it so much before you ran out of profile...

This was ran with a small shaper and powerfeed...
 

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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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It’s always a matter of aesthetics for me. Whether I use a round-over or chamfer depends on what works best for the project. For this project, I used a 22 1/2º chamfer bit because it gave me the look I wanted. A 45º chamfer would have removed too much material away from the edge.
398355
 
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