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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The cast iron extension table that the new cast iron Sawstop router table replaced? I bought the Incra LS Positioner and fence system and am adding the router fence and joinery package to the system. For this to have a good working range for the router I needed to mount the router table next to the cabinet table to the right of the saw blade. Turns out the router table insert only has mounting holes on one side of the cast iron so attaching the extension table after router table isn't possible without drilling new holes which I'm not really comfortable with at this point. Holding and positioning the cast iron table with this not quite recovered shoulder was a stretch in more than one way. My PT lady wasn't so thrilled about it either although I'm ahead of schedule in recovery. Anyway I need to store that extension table somewhere and I'm guessing the flatter the better and away from any possible moisture but my main concern is how likely is it that it could warp in time? At this point the only place to keep it out of the way and reasonable flat is on my clamp rack shelf which is basically a 3/4" plywood shelf that will more than cover the length and width of the table with about 3" extra front and side. There is a vertical divider under that shelf so it has plenty of support and my straight edge shows it's flat. The basement shop is conditioned and humidity seldom rises over 40% even with this extremely wet year we've had and it seems like it will continue as such at least for the time being. I think it was the 3rd wettest year here since they started recording th weather. Point being humidity and temperatures aren't an issue.
 

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With your low shop humidity, I think you're good and warping shouldn't be a problem whether the extension is on your saw table or stored in your shop. A good waxing or use of a rust prohibition product like CorrosionX and you should be set.

As that sucker is cast iron and heavy, I'd be more concerned about it falling off the shelf and breaking your foot! Is there no way to place it on supports yet keep it just above the floor? You know how grandkids like to climb around and get into places where they're not supposed to!

Steve
 
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Steve...You might want to check this with a machine shop but I would consider storing it on edge. By laying it flat on a surface that might not be completely level/flat it might develop a set, for instance, across the diagonal.

Again, check with a shop and see what they say about storing on edge based on its dimensions...

Not sure how long you need to store it but a good waxing will keep it good...provided you let some air in there so it doesn't develop condensation with temperature changes. Don't wrap towels or paper towels around it...they will collect moisture.

Good luck...
 

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heavy coat of wax...
sticker it w/ a lot of plastic stickers.. not wood or metal..
store machined face down open to the air..
 

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Steve...You might want to check this with a machine shop but I would consider storing it on edge.

1... By laying it flat on a surface that might not be completely level/flat it might develop a set, for instance, across the diagonal.

2... storing on edge...

3... a good waxing will keep it good...

4... let some air in there so it doesn't develop condensation with temperature changes.

5... Don't wrap towels or paper towels around it...they will collect moisture.

Good luck...
1... that is the job of the stickers to accomplish...

2... most excellent chance it will cup...

3... yes...

4... correct... the other job the stickers do by letting it breathe...

5... correct... unless it's soaked in Cosmoline...

6... VOE...
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies. I'll check with the machine shop I use to help out at part time and see about the oiled paper we used to ship parts (gears, steering systems, heck just about anything actually). I will be calling Sawstop about maybe drilling those 5 holes to mount the table but that will be at least two months yet. I really need to let the shoulder finish healing before do more of this heavy stuff. Alright maybe a week or two and I'll look at it again.....
 

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Thanks for the replies. I'll check with the machine shop I use to help out at part time and see about the oiled paper we used to ship parts (gears, steering systems, heck just about anything actually). I will be calling Sawstop about maybe drilling those 5 holes to mount the table but that will be at least two months yet. I really need to let the shoulder finish healing before do more of this heavy stuff. Alright maybe a week or two and I'll look at it again.....

Let your shoulder heal...the iron won't go anywhere unless you've put feet on it...:surprise:
 

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Steve,

I hope your shoulder heals well. In your thanks reply you state that you used to help out at a machine shop. I would ask them to drill the holes and it would probably be free. If the wing is too heavy, ask a friend or relative to help you for all 5 minutes to hold the wing while you bolt it. With the wing in place you won't be concerned about storing it and your saw will have a nice big surface. I worked as a sales rep for a machine shop about 9 years ago and still have an excellent relationship with them. I left on good terms. If you still decide to store it, do NOT use the shipping paper they use. This is for short term use only, and can collect humidity as the oil in it evaporates. I have been selling chemicals to the metal working industry for a little over 2 years now and I know we sell rust inhibitors in Ontario and Quebec and only in industrial quantities, but I'm sure the auto parts stores or welding supply stores will have something to offer you for extended periods.
Dan
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Believe it or not out here in the country where I live there's a machine shop about 5-6 miles from home. I was amazed when I happened upon it and took a look. We're talking computerized milling systems liquid cooled. I was there for maybe a year but standing on those concrete floors and the replacement knees was a bad match. I was there to solely learn something new. I was the labor part of that operation, checking tolerances and feeding stock. I did get to do some work on an old manual milling machine and lathe but not as much as I wanted to. It gave me a chance to use some of my Father's tools I inherited from when he was a machinist at Wright Aeronautical (Curtiss-Wright) in Patterson, New Jersey. Wasn't too far from where my older brother took accordion lessons, something I wish I could forget...

I'll definitely check with Cliff about drilling those holes as it would be nice to have more table although I have made a wood extension for now. I'm planning on building a rolling cabinet to store all my table saw stuff in that fits under the saw. With the router table now on the table saw the cabinet will need to be moved when I transfer the router and lift to that table. Meanwhile I'll look into rust inhibitors and give the top and sides a good waxing. Thanks for the advice.
 
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