Router Forums banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
964 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I have been working on my New Yankee Router Station and am nearing completion. I am debating if I should use the Fence in the plans , or several years ago I purchased a Freud Fence that seems to have better fine tuning capabilities but no place for a feather board from the top.
I don't have a bit to cut the slot for the bolts to hold the feather board but I bought several t tracks because I also want to make a crosscut sled and a drill press table.
So what are your opinions on the fence choice ?

TIA, Dan
 

Attachments

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
I've heard issues with some of the fences which have individually adjustable halves which allow for jointing. The complaints were about getting the separate fences back to zero again. I don't know if that is one of those or not. It would seem to be a better idea to have ones have ones that you just shim behind for that one function.
 

·
Registered
Theo
Joined
·
7,182 Posts
Can't say, because I do not use a fence on the router. However, have an upcoming project where a fence will be mandatory if I want to finish quickly and consistently. Right now I'm trying to decide whether to use a chunk of 2X4, or 1X2, or whatever else is handy. I will need precise and consistent results, but a fence like I plan will do exactly that for me, if I watch what I am doing. Sometimes you just don't need fancy to do the job. And as this will hopefully be a one time thing, not about to buy anything, or make anything fancy. If I were you I'd just pick the fence I liked most and go with it.
 

·
Premium Member
Rick
Joined
·
17,544 Posts
I've heard issues with some of the fences which have individually adjustable halves which allow for jointing. The complaints were about getting the separate fences back to zero again. I don't know if that is one of those or not. It would seem to be a better idea to have ones have ones that you just shim behind for that one function.
Separate fences sound like a great idea . I’m liking the idea of having a dedicated fence for jointing .
I still regret buying an Incra system, as I’d be building multiple fences if I could do it all over again
 

·
Registered
Theo
Joined
·
7,182 Posts
Separate fences sound like a great idea . I’m liking the idea of having a dedicated fence for jointing .
I still regret buying an Incra system, as I’d be building multiple fences if I could do it all over again
And there are free fence plans on line. I'd make multiples also, all non adjustable, which is why multiples. To me they are just not that hard to make.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
964 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What if I make 2 sets of openings; 1 for the Freud and 1 for the New Yankee ?
Or maybe I could simply modify the plans and make one set of openings and modify the New Yankee fence opening locations in the table top to use the same holes as the Freud.
If you are facing the front, the left side fence has an adjustment knob on the Freud. It doesn't look complicated to use.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
I posted a picture of my home made one in another one of your threads here Dan: https://www.routerforums.com/general-routing/140779-router-bits-how-many-2.html It has a basic frame with moveable faces added by routing slots in the frame and then matching ones in the faces with a wider slot on the front of the faces for the heads on the carriage bolts that hold the faces to the frame. The square shoulder on the bolts fit tight in the grooves and keep them from turning when I tighten the knobs that clamp them. The moveable faces add versatility because I can slip shims down over the bolts on the outfeed for jointing and I can remove those faces add put different ones on for other jobs. I have a tall set that I use for edge routing standing panels and I have plans for ones with t tracks for stops and hold downs. The original reason I made the fence with sliding faces was to keep the gap around the bit close, partly for safety and partly to keep from making divots when starting and stopping but later I realized that I could change them for different ones as needed.

BTW, I put my on/off switch on top of the dust collection box on the fence and after using it for a while now I'll never mount it anywhere else again.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Nickp

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,032 Posts
I've heard issues with some of the fences which have individually adjustable halves which allow for jointing. The complaints were about getting the separate fences back to zero again. I don't know if that is one of those or not. It would seem to be a better idea to have ones have ones that you just shim behind for that one function.
Chuck I have a Woodpecker split fence that has the ability to be offset and haven't had issues getting it back afterwards. One side is adjustable and a good straightedge will make quick work of it. Just loosen the adjuster and bring back to even with the fixed side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
689 Posts
Charles, I am coming to your way of thinking as regards the switch. I have put one under the front edge of the table for all three of my table-mounted routers, following the wisdom that one could “bump” off the power with a hip or knee, in an emergency. But in my disorderly and overpopulated shop, all that has happened is that I have broken off two of the paddles, while moving around (when the routers were not in use). Come to think of it, if things were to go south, it would happen so fast, that I am not sure there would be any real benefit to the front-mounted location.
Regarding the fence itself, I have combined an aluminium angle, the largest standard size available, with two moveable front fences. The L-angle is one piece, with a mouse-hole for the largest bit I am likely to use (horizontal panel raiser).
On the larger table, the split front fences are 32 mmk chipboard (left over from a kitchen counter). They have countersunk bolts, riding in horizontal slots in the L, with star knobs behind the fence.

The smaller table has the same L, but I happened on some extruded aluminium profile, which is rectangular 20mm by 40mm, with two T-slots on each face, and one on each edge. To avoid having to cut a mousehole in such a complicated profile, I opted for two sections, attached to the L with T bolts and Star knobs at the back. But I must say it is overkill, and causes some loss of efficiency with the dust extraction. I am considering splicing the two sections after cutting half a mousehole in each, and then attaching split hardboard fences in front, with countersunk bolts and sliding nuts in the tracks.

One of the benefits of the profile is that it sits squarely on the table top. I found that the L flexed ever so slightly with a tall workpiece. Also, the slightly radiused corners provide an escape for sawdust.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,625 Posts
I have a Bosch split fence from their 1181 table. It has dust collection and uses shims (1/32 and 1/16) for jointing. For that matter a DIY shim of any size will work... It also has a track for featherboard but a spacer is needed behind it to bring the featherboard out enough to sit in front of the fence. The split fences also slide side-to-side to accommodate various bit diameters.

I like the simplicity of the shims.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Chuck I have a Woodpecker split fence that has the ability to be offset and haven't had issues getting it back afterwards. One side is adjustable and a good straightedge will make quick work of it. Just loosen the adjuster and bring back to even with the fixed side.
Steve I can't remember all the details about the fence I read about, including which brand it was, but as I recall both sides had micro adjustable faces and may not have had a main frame to back them up to. I remember the owner saying that getting them lined back up was extremely frustrating. I think simplicity is the best policy and I have also read by someone who took the time to check is that plastic playing cards like the ones you get at a dollar store for $2-3 a pack make excellent shims because the cards are nearly perfectly uniform from card to card. They are long enough that you can cut slots in them and just slide them over the bolts that hold the faces on. How thick isn't that important as the most important part is having them the same thickness behind both bolts so that the fence is uniformly offset end to end.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DesertRatTom

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Charles, I am coming to your way of thinking as regards the switch. I have put one under the front edge of the table for all three of my table-mounted routers, following the wisdom that one could “bump” off the power with a hip or knee, in an emergency. But in my disorderly and overpopulated shop, all that has happened is that I have broken off two of the paddles, while moving around (when the routers were not in use). Come to think of it, if things were to go south, it would happen so fast, that I am not sure there would be any real benefit to the front-mounted location.
Regarding the fence itself, I have combined an aluminium angle, the largest standard size available, with two moveable front fences. The L-angle is one piece, with a mouse-hole for the largest bit I am likely to use (horizontal panel raiser).
On the larger table, the split front fences are 32 mmk chipboard (left over from a kitchen counter). They have countersunk bolts, riding in horizontal slots in the L, with star knobs behind the fence.

The smaller table has the same L, but I happened on some extruded aluminium profile, which is rectangular 20mm by 40mm, with two T-slots on each face, and one on each edge. To avoid having to cut a mousehole in such a complicated profile, I opted for two sections, attached to the L with T bolts and Star knobs at the back. But I must say it is overkill, and causes some loss of efficiency with the dust extraction. I am considering splicing the two sections after cutting half a mousehole in each, and then attaching split hardboard fences in front, with countersunk bolts and sliding nuts in the tracks.

One of the benefits of the profile is that it sits squarely on the table top. I found that the L flexed ever so slightly with a tall workpiece. Also, the slightly radiused corners provide an escape for sawdust.
One thing you can depend on with aluminum extrusions is that they are going to be straight and uniform. I bought a length of 3/8 x 3/4 mild steel bar once which I was going to use on a TS cut off sled for a runner. The bar isn't uniform enough to slide in a standard slot. I would have to mill it more uniform first so I wound up making one out of hardwood instead which has worked fine for about 20 years.

As for the fence mounted switch it started out as a matter of necessity. I need to be able to work from both sides of my table. My back doesn't last for long if I'm bent over the table doing a bunch of small pieces so I need to have my table so I can be as close as possible on one side but with enough room on the other side if I'm doing panels. You can't have a switch mounted on one side and the only way the switch can easily follow you around the table is if it's mounted on the fence.

Despite all the arguments about under the table lip and "I only have to bump it with my knee" I still found myself occasionally making multiple stabs at it (and the one on my TS) because you often need to move your feet while you are working so your relationship to the switch keeps changing. With it mounted on the fence above the bit it is always virtually dead center in my field of vision and only inches away from my hands so getting to the switch is a fraction of a second if needed and I know exactly where it is at all times.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Biagio

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,438 Posts
Lots of good suggestions. Personally, I like having a tall fence (10-12 inches will do) to more easily align end cuts on stiles for example. I guess you could just remove the split pieces and just bolt a solid, tall fence in their place. If you are milling picture frame material, for example, you will need a fence tall enough to support the back of the workpiece since it must support the flat side of the piece as you cut away the profile on the other side. A vetical table is preferred for this since the bits are tall, but I don't have that luxury at this point.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top