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They have low ground pressure and steel tracks. Not that hard to believe but it was an interesting video.
 

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Theo
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Looked to me more like the driver was speeding, then put on the brakes. The other tanks were going slower and they weren't having problems.
 

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That would be a quick parade at that speed.
 

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I play a lot of World of Tanks on Xbox and I love using my little Panzer I C for scouting out the enemy for my comrades and yeah, if I get going for any distance and run into the enemy and want to turn back, I will slide all over the place. The light tanks just don't have much traction.

But I have to admit, that was hilarious to see!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Charles commented that tanks have steel treads; that got my curiosity up.
https://www.google.ca/search?q=Tank...XA_1PmRFSDC6guYwXkyoSCcr5koZo4WzWEcv7OwG8UH1q
I remember in the '70s and 80s reading of the complaints from European cities, that NATO tanks were tearing up their streets, roads, farmland, everything, while running manoeuvres. I seem to remember that tanks had to have rubber pads or be moved by transporters. Makes sense.
 

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Yeah, they do use some sort of rubber, but even those pics you posted Dan, if you go down far enough, you can see that some of them have like "cleats" protruding from the rubber and there's even one that shows a line of holes between the pads sticking into the dirt. But metal or rubber, you get onto a wet pavement and your surface is still dry-ish, you are going skating! WEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!
 

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Charles commented that tanks have steel treads; that got my curiosity up.
https://www.google.ca/search?q=Tank...XA_1PmRFSDC6guYwXkyoSCcr5koZo4WzWEcv7OwG8UH1q
I remember in the '70s and 80s reading of the complaints from European cities, that NATO tanks were tearing up their streets, roads, farmland, everything, while running manoeuvres. I seem to remember that tanks had to have rubber pads or be moved by transporters. Makes sense.
I was stationed in Germany back in the 70s and we had to replace all of the rubber pads on our Armored Personnel Carriers prior to heading out for maneuvers. to keep them from digging up the roads. They would slide all over a cobblestone street when they were wet.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
David; thanks for confirming that. I'm a wee bit confused though. Did you use the rubber on the streets and the steel in the field, and was it the rubber or the steel that was the slipping issue?
I was on a tour bus years ago, when a horse drawn cart crashed into us. The horses' iron shoes couldn't get a grip on the dry cobblestones (never mind wet!) and the heavy cart just drove them into us.
Tough ponies; they just shook it off.
 

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David; thanks for confirming that. I'm a wee bit confused though. Did you use the rubber on the streets and the steel in the field, and was it the rubber or the steel that was the slipping issue?
I was on a tour bus years ago, when a horse drawn cart crashed into us. The horses' iron shoes couldn't get a grip on the dry cobblestones (never mind wet!) and the heavy cart just drove them into us.
Tough ponies; they just shook it off.
The pads are made of metal with rubber inserts. When new, the rubber touches the street, but as they wear off , and they wear off rapidly on concrete, they need to be replaced so the steel frames do not hit the road.
The rubber pads have two bolts that are built into them to attach them to the tracks.
When wet, they tend to slide no matter if rubber or metal is touching.
David
 
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