Router Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Folks- Recently joined the group, and a planning an exciting project. I've been building a huge barn that will one day be our home. We have a sweet old Montana homestead property, and live in a farm house built in 1900. It is too cool to add a big addition onto, so we're building the barn. The barn fits well into the landscape of the property, and the existing house will be a guest house. We are using a lot of reclaimed materials on the barn, and performance items like roofing have been chosen to blend into the older materials.

I've decided to build my own wood windows. Most of the window locations are high, and sheltered by the eaves. The windows are also small 2x2 and 2x4 (though ther are about 30 of them). The combination of weather protected locations and small size have given me the courage to use wood windows vs. aluminum clad. Simple awning operation should be easy on the design/build aspect as well. My pre-finishing company finishes wood winodws all the time for a luxury mountain resort area, and we have been able to distress, wire wheel, and finish windows to fit right in with reclaimed wood interiors and exteriors.

I'll be using insulated glass, so the 2-piece bit sets from Freud, Amana, and CMT will not be able to do all of the work. I'll have to extend the rabbit to encompass the thickness of the insulated glass as well as the interior glass stops.

I'll buy glass that has divided lite hardware within two solid panes of glass vs. 4 individual pieces of insulated glass per 2'x2' sash. The muntins would simply be stuck on with exterior grade double-sided tape as I've seen with several wood window manufacturers.

I was looking at Freud's 2" thick door rail and stile bit set, and thought I could use it in a modified application for the window sashes. Looks like I'll get a stronger and more balanced joint on the 2" thick windows, while still having a nice rabbit for the glass to seat into on one side. I'd have to rip the interior "stop" off, and seal/pin nail a seperate stop after glass installation.

Does anyone have any ideas that might steer me in a different direction? I located and ordered an out of print book called "Make Your Own Handcrafted Windows and Doors" by John Birchard. It will show up early next week, along with my new 3-1/4hp Triton. I tried ordering a Grizzly router table/fence/stand, but they are out of stock for awhile. I'll order a MLCS table top/fence/plate combo tomorrow instead.

I've been told that Radiata Pine would make a nice stable wood. I'm also thinking of using some of the reclaimed doug fir that I have tons of... dry and tight grained. I also have access to some nice tight grained reclaimed white oak that would make for a pretty window. How would the white oak do for movement on an exterior wood window? I know it will be tougher to keep a finish on the oak, but I've finished some nice exterior white oak doors that have held up well so far. The small window sizes allow me to use what most dealers consider scrap from their reclaimed lumber yards.

Sorry for the long post. Just getting started, and have lots to nail down. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Hi Chris

I suggest you use the bit set below :) see the bottom of the web page.
3pc 1/2" SH Window Sash/Glass Door R&S Router Bit Set - eBay (item 130481274045 end time Feb-06-11 18:30:07 PST)

======

Hi Folks- Recently joined the group, and a planning an exciting project. I've been building a huge barn that will one day be our home. We have a sweet old Montana homestead property, and live in a farm house built in 1900. It is too cool to add a big addition onto, so we're building the barn. The barn fits well into the landscape of the property, and the existing house will be a guest house. We are using a lot of reclaimed materials on the barn, and performance items like roofing have been chosen to blend into the older materials.

I've decided to build my own wood windows. Most of the window locations are high, and sheltered by the eaves. The windows are also small 2x2 and 2x4 (though ther are about 30 of them). The combination of weather protected locations and small size have given me the courage to use wood windows vs. aluminum clad. Simple awning operation should be easy on the design/build aspect as well. My pre-finishing company finishes wood winodws all the time for a luxury mountain resort area, and we have been able to distress, wire wheel, and finish windows to fit right in with reclaimed wood interiors and exteriors.

I'll be using insulated glass, so the 2-piece bit sets from Freud, Amana, and CMT will not be able to do all of the work. I'll have to extend the rabbit to encompass the thickness of the insulated glass as well as the interior glass stops.

I'll buy glass that has divided lite hardware within two solid panes of glass vs. 4 individual pieces of insulated glass per 2'x2' sash. The muntins would simply be stuck on with exterior grade double-sided tape as I've seen with several wood window manufacturers.

I was looking at Freud's 2" thick door rail and stile bit set, and thought I could use it in a modified application for the window sashes. Looks like I'll get a stronger and more balanced joint on the 2" thick windows, while still having a nice rabbit for the glass to seat into on one side. I'd have to rip the interior "stop" off, and seal/pin nail a seperate stop after glass installation.

Does anyone have any ideas that might steer me in a different direction? I located and ordered an out of print book called "Make Your Own Handcrafted Windows and Doors" by John Birchard. It will show up early next week, along with my new 3-1/4hp Triton. I tried ordering a Grizzly router table/fence/stand, but they are out of stock for awhile. I'll order a MLCS table top/fence/plate combo tomorrow instead.

I've been told that Radiata Pine would make a nice stable wood. I'm also thinking of using some of the reclaimed doug fir that I have tons of... dry and tight grained. I also have access to some nice tight grained reclaimed white oak that would make for a pretty window. How would the white oak do for movement on an exterior wood window? I know it will be tougher to keep a finish on the oak, but I've finished some nice exterior white oak doors that have held up well so far. The small window sizes allow me to use what most dealers consider scrap from their reclaimed lumber yards.

Sorry for the long post. Just getting started, and have lots to nail down. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the ebay link Bob. This looks like a great bit set, and I like the addtional 3rd bit that Freud and Amana don't include. Heres the thing about all of these sash bit sets that I have a hard time figuring out... they look like they are designed for using a single pane of 1/8" glass. I'll be using thermal glass units that measure in the neighborhood of 3/4" thick. How tough would it be to re-rout the depth to make a deeper recess for the thicker glass and also include an interior glass stop?

Also, if this is easy enough to do, won't most of the glue joint and mortise/tenon be off-balance with the total thickness of the sash? I figure my window sash thickness will be around 1-3/4" and 2" thick to encompass 3/4" glass and an interior and exterior stop (mullion, muntin, sash bar), each at .50-.63" thick. I also have to contend with being able to hide the interior metal surround of the thermal glass units. I figure 1/2" coverage will be necessary.

I'm excited to start making prototypes, and may end up purchasing a window sash bit set as well as an exterior door stile/rail bit set to start experimenting. Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,165 Posts
Do you really need a sash set of bits?
I'm thinking you could use a table saw to cut a rabbet in the rails and stiles, and use whatever profile you like to shape the outside edge.
The glass sets would fit into the rabbet, and then make inner trim to match the outer edge treatment. Same with the muntins.
The opposite of the trim bit you used would make the muntin ends to fit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You're right, that would be an easy solution. That way I could control the dimensions of everything a little closer. I do like the idea of having a nice glue joint in the rail and stile bit set. I'll back up the strength with a mortise/tenon, pegs, or screws. I think I've decided to go with Freud or similar 2" exterior door rail and stile bit set. Its got the perfect dimensions for the glass, and has natural stops in the perfect dimension as well.

Thanks for the input!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
2 pc 1/2" SH Entry Door Matched R&S Router Bit Set - eBay (item 140507188090 end time Feb-06-11 17:52:48 PST)

============

You're right, that would be an easy solution. That way I could control the dimensions of everything a little closer. I do like the idea of having a nice glue joint in the rail and stile bit set. I'll back up the strength with a mortise/tenon, pegs, or screws. I think I've decided to go with Freud or similar 2" exterior door rail and stile bit set. Its got the perfect dimensions for the glass, and has natural stops in the perfect dimension as well.

Thanks for the input!
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top