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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
We've had an on-again / off-again discussion about transferring laser printed patterns to wood. Barb (outofthewoodwork) has been successfully using wintergreen oil while I have been having good results using lacquer thinner.

I finally got some wintergreen oil and gave the the two methods a side-by-side test. The pattern was printed on my laser printer and taped to a piece of pine so it wouldn't move around. Barb said she uses a Q-tip to apply the oil so I used a Q-tip to apply both the thinner and the oil.

I did the lacquer thinner image first and followed my usual method of lightly rubbing the paper with the lacquer thinner soaked tip. I found when using the oil that I had to burnish harder with the Q-tip than I did with the lacquer thinner so there may be some variance because of the difference in how I burnished each image.

You can see the results in the final photo. From an application standpoint the wintergreen oil is clearly more pleasant to work with and would be the method of choice when working in a small room without good ventilation.

And the Winner Is: Still undecided for me. The two methods yielded remarkably similar results. The oil left residue on the wood that the thinner didn't but that probably isn't an issue when the project is finished. I think you could be happy using either method.

EDIT: Going back and looking at the two transfers an hour or so after taking the pictures I would say the Wintergreen oil gives crisper edges (as seen in the type). Since the lacquer thinner is ... well ... thinner, the image tends to bleed a little. So if fine detail is important, the wintergreen oil may have the edge.
 

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If you've had other conversations about this then you may already have discussed this. I use an inkjet printer for this. I use a peel and stick sheet from which all of the sticker part has been peeled off; you basically are using a piece of wax paper at this point. You print onto that shiny surface, sometimes using "draft" mode is best, and then you just lay it on/burnish it to the wood. Easy peasy.

Here's a quickie I did for my tomo nagura box:
 

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Paul
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Has anyone tried ironing on a laser printer one?
 

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Laser & iron

Has anyone tried ironing on a laser printer one?
I haven't used a clothes iron, but I've used a woodburning pen with a large flat tip. Works pretty well but takes time and is very temperature and pressure sensitive. I'll try wintergreen oil next time I need to do a transfer.
 

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I got to watch Barb at work with the winter-green oil a few weeks back. I was simply AMAZED at how quickly and easily she got the image transferred to the wood. I've never seen the lacquer thinner method, but if it's anything close to the winter-green oil, it would be a hard choice to make.
 
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When using the Ink Jet

If you've had other conversations about this then you may already have discussed this. I use an inkjet printer for this. I use a peel and stick sheet from which all of the sticker part has been peeled off; you basically are using a piece of wax paper at this point. You print onto that shiny surface, sometimes using "draft" mode is best, and then you just lay it on/burnish it to the wood. Easy peasy.

Here's a quickie I did for my tomo nagura box:


Can you tell me how long is the delay is between printing and burnishing onto the wood?
 

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Can you tell me how long is the delay is between printing and burnishing onto the wood?
You have a surprisingly long time to do it. In my case it was long enough to print it, walk to the garage, find the damned box I intended to place it upon, and then decide how to make sure I laid it on straight/smoothly.

If I were forced to guess I'd bet the time was close to 5 minutes.
 

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Doug
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Thanks to the ACME research labs for this insightful study. I have done the acetone trick, but not a lot of others. I might have to try this with some of my scroll saw patterns instead of gluing them on. If I could find RED toner, that would be even better!

D
 

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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Thanks to the ACME research labs for this insightful study. I have done the acetone trick, but not a lot of others. I might have to try this with some of my scroll saw patterns instead of gluing them on. If I could find RED toner, that would be even better!

D
@kp91

If you make your printouts from a color laser you can transfer any color you want, Doug. Here's a link to Barb's excellent video on how she uses wintegreen oil.

If I had watched it again before I made my test I wouldn't have used too much oil as I did in a few areas.

@OutoftheWoodwork

Maybe Barb can chime in with some comments and advice.
 

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Thanks for posting that Oliver, that is quite different than I had envisioned it. I had tried the hot iron,wood burning tool before with terrible results and never went back.

When you mentioned the solvent transfer, I thought it was soaking a lot of solvent on the back of the paper and letting it dry, I didn't realize it had to be pressed on with a scraper. I will have to retry this method.

Herb
 

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Doug
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Thanks!

Red lines are a lot easier for me to see when scrolling. My little corner where I have my saw on the ship doesn't have very good light, so I need every advantage I can get.

Sure beats carbon paper transfers!
 

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First, let me say that is a great video from Barb!

Second, I will say that this kinda work isn't something I've had need for thus far.

Third (and most importantly) Wintergreen Oil has a very pleasant smell and won't knock you down with its vapors. Lacquer thinner use should always be kept to a minimum! It is dangerous to handle or to inhale and is EXTREMELY VOLATILE!

Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia
 

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I like Barb's method for applying images to my projects, if these images will become part of the final project, but I think I've been using a better way for applying my scroll saw cutting patterns.

I would like to suggest using "Applique Film". It's a clear, slightly frosted, mylar sheet with a peel and stick backing that is laser printer and photo copier friendly. It's available from stationary supply stores and artist supply stores in 8 1/2 X 11" sheets. If they don't have it in stock they can order it for you. The version that I use is Chartpak DAFR8. Laser printed images copy to it very well and 1 pixel wide lines print very crisp on a 600 DPI laser printer (I use an old HP Laserjet 1100). Once the image is printed on the sheet, you just peel off the backing and apply it to the surface of the wood. For smaller images I use image processing software on my computer to place multiple copies of the image on the sheet before printing, and then just cut each image free from the sheet when ready to use it. This film can be lifted off and re-applied several times to clean dry wood without a significant loss of it's stickiness, so you don't need to worry about positioning it perfectly on the first try. Once it's in it's final position I just rub it all over to stick it on well and remove any air bubbles. I then cut the wood, following the lines on the applique pattern. When the cutting is complete, the applique film peels off of the wood easily and cleanly, leaving no significant glue residue on the wood. This applique film has become my preferred choice for applying my cutting patterns for scroll sawing.

Charley
 

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Has anyone tried ironing on a laser printer one?
I've tried numerous ways, this included, and had little to no luck with it. Thanks to another member (Richard... from Canada-forget what his nickname on here is.. STUPID BRAIN!!!) Anyway, Thanks to Richard, I found the Wintergreen Oil, and have stayed with it.
 

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I like Barb's method for applying images to my projects, if these images will become part of the final project, but I think I've been using a better way for applying my scroll saw cutting patterns.

I would like to suggest using "Applique Film". It's a clear, slightly frosted, mylar sheet with a peel and stick backing that is laser printer and photo copier friendly. It's available from stationary supply stores and artist supply stores in 8 1/2 X 11" sheets. If they don't have it in stock they can order it for you. The version that I use is Chartpak DAFR8. Laser printed images copy to it very well and 1 pixel wide lines print very crisp on a 600 DPI laser printer (I use an old HP Laserjet 1100). Once the image is printed on the sheet, you just peel off the backing and apply it to the surface of the wood. For smaller images I use image processing software on my computer to place multiple copies of the image on the sheet before printing, and then just cut each image free from the sheet when ready to use it. This film can be lifted off and re-applied several times to clean dry wood without a significant loss of it's stickiness, so you don't need to worry about positioning it perfectly on the first try. Once it's in it's final position I just rub it all over to stick it on well and remove any air bubbles. I then cut the wood, following the lines on the applique pattern. When the cutting is complete, the applique film peels off of the wood easily and cleanly, leaving no significant glue residue on the wood. This applique film has become my preferred choice for applying my cutting patterns for scroll sawing.

Charley
I've used this type of method for scrolling, Charley, and don't agree. First, page per page, the cost is much higher, and wasteful, and the second reason, is you have a higher chance of losing your pattern, as I don't care how hard you press, and get rid of the air bubbles, it can come up from the movement of the saw blade... just like Olivers' adhesive way. If you use the wintergreen oil it's on the wood, and no chance of the pattern coming loose, flapping. Your pattern wont move, and there's no paper or sticker to remove when you're done. Much cleaner, and less waste. But if it works for you, God Bless. Your comment on "if these images will become part of the final project" confuses me... your designs are part of the final project just as well, and well, when scrolling, you'll cut away all the lines with my method, and whether there is little, or a lot, you still have sticky residue left that will have to be removed as well, and the glue, no matter how little, will dull your blades a lot quicker than using my method. :smile:
 

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Oliver, where the heck have I been? I didn't even see this post!!! (Using my phone app most of the time, seems I'm missing quite a bit.
Only when on my laptop and I see the mentions on here, am I catching everything.

THANK YOU for doing this comparison... And I have to say, if I have a simple pattern, I may consider the thinner. I would use a gauze pad, I think to apply to help prevent the running, I think. To burnish, I use the cap of the wintergreen oil. It goes much quicker and less pressure is needed. (I've also used plastic coasters, or anything that will act as a firm scrapper).I can usually tell how it's going, because it's a bit tacky when I lift.
 

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@kp91

If you make your printouts from a color laser you can transfer any color you want, Doug. Here's a link to Barb's excellent video on how she uses wintegreen oil. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0EQam-gymlg&feature=youtu.be

If I had watched it again before I made my test I wouldn't have used too much oil as I did in a few areas.

@OutoftheWoodwork

Maybe Barb can chime in with some comments and advice.
Oliver, I love you!!! I DID make a video!! How'd you find it? Guess I'm not as crazy as I thought! LOL (Well, maybe I am, but we won't tell anyone, okay? LOL)
 

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First, let me say that is a great video from Barb!

Second, I will say that this kinda work isn't something I've had need for thus far.

Third (and most importantly) Wintergreen Oil has a very pleasant smell and won't knock you down with its vapors. Lacquer thinner use should always be kept to a minimum! It is dangerous to handle or to inhale and is EXTREMELY VOLATILE!

Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia
Thank you Otis. That's very sweet of you. I thought I had done one, but had no idea where it was.
 

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Thanks to the ACME research labs for this insightful study. I have done the acetone trick, but not a lot of others. I might have to try this with some of my scroll saw patterns instead of gluing them on. If I could find RED toner, that would be even better!

D
You can use a color laser printer or save it to disc and get a color copy made for 25 cents
 
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