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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Good day all.

I will be storing my Ridgid TS-3660 table saw in our unheated garage. I have watched several YT videos where either one of these products was used to protect the saws cast iron top. Just wanted your thoughts!

Boeshield T-9 vs Fluid Film

Thank you and have a nice day

Peter
 

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Storage? Paint all of the orange black, roll it in the kitchen, stick the microwave on top of it and tell the wife it's a new portable Island!

I've "Heard" great things about Boeshield T-9 but don't have personal experience with it. I would imagine there are several products that will protect the cast iron... pick the one that comes off easiest. My original thought was Johnson's Paste Wax not buffed out but that would be a pain trying to buff it out after a couple of months.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Storage? Paint all of the orange black, roll it in the kitchen, stick the microwave on top of it and tell the wife it's a new portable Island!

I've "Heard" great things about Boeshield T-9 but don't have personal experience with it. I would imagine there are several products that will protect the cast iron... pick the one that comes off easiest. My original thought was Johnson's Paste Wax not buffed out but hat would be a pain trying to buff it out after a couple of months.
Nah! I think that I'll go with your portable island idea. She's been trying to get me to put one in for years.

But seriously! Thanks for the reply. Much appreciated. Peter
 

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I have a general international cabinet saw and have never done a thing for winter . The cast top has been fine so far , but maybe your mileage may very in damper climates
 

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Peter I think either will work well unless you have a high condensation situation. I've used Boeshield T-9 and wax and both work really well. The Boeshield is likely easier to apply. I'd cover the saw with an old blanket and tarp as well just for good measure. Then again the disguise as a kitchen island may just work....
 

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Hi Peter,

I am in Maine and I use a magnetic table saw cover that helps a lot.

https://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/magnetic_table_saw_cover.html.

I would put on multiple coats of Johnson Wax or another type of protection. This is what I do and I have still have seen light rust which I wipe off as soon as I see it.

If you do not plan to use the table saw during the winter you might think about spraying it down with WD-40 or CRC 3-36 (better) and use the magnetic cover on top of the oil film. In the Spring clean it off with Simple Green Pro.

You may find this test on 46 different metal protection products interesting.

Comprehensive Corrosion Test: 46 Products Compared | Day At The Range
 

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peterbata, i us an e the Boeshield T-9 year around and find it works great. I have never used the other brand you have mentioned.
 

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Boshield works extremely well. ON all my iron.

I seem to recall this originated at Boeing to protect surfaces during construction. I live in a dry, but cold place and my coating lasts for a couple of years.
 

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Boeshield

I've used Boeshield since I moved to a Nebraska house a little over two years ago that didn't have a basement shop, so my big tools are now all in the garage. I use it on my tablesaw, drill press, jointer, and bandsaw tables and it seems to work well, as long as I reapply it 2-4 times per year, depending on how much use the tools get. It goes on pretty easily after I wipe off the table thoroughly with a rag or paper towel to get all of the dust and dirt off.
 

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Peter,

As I stated in other posts, my table saw is all Aluminum so I don't have any issues, but when I did not heat my shop, my other cast iron tops such as Joiner and drill press, I used paste wax and never had any problems. A nice feature is you don't have to remove come spring time, just buff it and you're good to go.

Dan
 

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As Danman noted, the paste wax lasts longer than T-9 because it dries down harder.

Another option is a marine grade protectant called TC-11 from Hawaii. It seems to be some sort of paraffin cut with petroleum machine oil. My understanding is that oils like this work okay with woodworking projects, as long they will sanded down a bit more.

The paraffin dries down as a film. It is very durable, sticks to All surfaces easily, is easy to apply, and it protects extremely well (was designed to protect fully exposed metal on ships at sea). It’s one fault is that it will build up thickly very quickly — it is like a much thicker T-9.
 

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I use Boeshield T-9 with great success. I even have the same table saw as you and also have it in an unheated garage. It protects against rust. When it dries, it leaves a slick wax-like surface. It won’t stain your wood. It also helps protect when cutting wet lumber like treated wood. I highly recommend the product.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Peter,

As I stated in other posts, my table saw is all Aluminum so I don't have any issues, but when I did not heat my shop, my other cast iron tops such as Joiner and drill press, I used paste wax and never had any problems. A nice feature is you don't have to remove come spring time, just buff it and you're good to go.

Dan
Thank you Dan. Is there a specific brand that you were using and might want to share with me. Appreciate it
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I use Boeshield T-9 with great success. I even have the same table saw as you and also have it in an unheated garage. It protects against rust. When it dries, it leaves a slick wax-like surface. It won’t stain your wood. It also helps protect when cutting wet lumber like treated wood. I highly recommend the product.
Thank you @jchamber Do you buff / wipe it off before use? Or, should I apply it when I am ready to stop using the saw? What do I do come spring / summer when I am ready to out her back into action
 

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Peter,

Funny you should ask, I still have the same bottle from many years ago and still use it twice per year to wax the surfaces of my tools including the Aluminum table saw because it makes it nice and smooth and everything slides better. The brand is good old Turtle Wax. It is a liquid that dries to a paste as you rub it on the surface. I apply and then buff it with a clean cotton rag. It works for me.

Cheers,

Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Peter,

Funny you should ask, I still have the same bottle from many years ago and still use it twice per year to wax the surfaces of my tools including the Aluminum table saw because it makes it nice and smooth and everything slides better. The brand is good old Turtle Wax. It is a liquid that dries to a paste as you rub it on the surface. I apply and then buff it with a clean cotton rag. It works for me.

Cheers,

Dan
Thank you Dan. Good 'Ol Turtle Wax. Some things never change!

I read somewhere that certain waxes contain silicone and that is something to stay away from.
 
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