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I know two things about electric motors. They turn on, and they turn off. So I was glad to see some info that starts explaining them to beginners like me.

Jeremy Fielding (the guy who shot his ruined project with a pistol) has a really good Youtube channel, and has a 3 part series on motors that is interesting:

Wiring motors from washing machines, etc. to power shop tools:

reversing Universal and induction motors:

Larger motors and speed control:

Jeremy has a lot of really good videos on his channel. Some for homemade equipment, upgrading, and a lot more. I highly recommend it: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_SLthyNX_ivd-dmsFgmJVg/videos
 

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Sorry that some of these show up as thumbnails, and others as links (like I intended). I don't know what causes the difference.
 

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Great info, Jim! Helps explain the basics to those of us who may be electrically challenged.

Although some of this stuff can "bite" you if your not careful, it is not above the average person to understand and perform these things.
 

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Anyone got information about using a dryer 220 v outlet to run a 220 v tool? There are a lot of very low priced 220 v tools out there, and it would be nice to know how someone has set up the wiring and plugs to make this work.
 

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Anyone got information about using a dryer 220 v outlet to run a 220 v tool? There are a lot of very low priced 220 v tools out there, and it would be nice to know how someone has set up the wiring and plugs to make this work.
Tom,

Not much different. Remember, 220 is just two 120 legs. The wiring diagram on the motor will show you which terminals you attach to the power supply.

However, the dryer plug(s) are configured to handle higher amperage then normal equipment that runs at a lower amperage, (drill presses, jointers, table saws etc.). Although not ideal I have a 5hp 20 gallon 220v compressor that I made a pig-tail to utilize the dryer plug. I have used this arrangement for 35 years with no problems. While I have never had a problem doing this, the lower amp tool (Compressor) may not trip the higher amp dryer breaker if it shorts.

Ideally, I should probably wire a lower amp breaker in-line on the pig-tail to trip in the event of a short.

If the motors are dual voltage you can take that 220v motor and swap a couple of wires to allow it to run on 120v. Most people don't understand, that, a 220v motor doesn't use less electricity, it only runs at a lower amperage. This allow for a lower total amp draw on your panel. Ideally, allowing you to operate more without overloading the panel.

This is not advise on how to do it only on what/how it works. I would suggest that you consult an electrician to meet local codes. It may be easier just to add a additional 220v breaker to an appropriate sized plug.
 

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Anyone got information about using a dryer 220 v outlet to run a 220 v tool? There are a lot of very low priced 220 v tools out there, and it would be nice to know how someone has set up the wiring and plugs to make this work.
Tom are you sure that it is a 240v. motor/ a lot of appliances that are 240v. have 120v. motors, they just use one leg of the 240 input.
The 240v. is used for the heating element.
Herb
 

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Probably one of the biggest issues would be finding enough room in the outlet box to make connections. There isn't a lot of extra room in those boxes once the plug goes into it and a wire connector large enough to bond 2 #10 wires together might be hard to fit in it. They may be like that on purpose since it is supposed to be a dedicated outlet with only the dryer on it. What would be a better plan would be to run the wire to a subpanel. Some are designed so that you can take a direct load off it without going through another breaker but allowing other loads taken off of it that are going through breakers (as in 15 or 20 amp breakers). The main wire is already coming off a 30 amp breaker in your main panel so it's protected for the dryer load and the subpanel would allow proper protection for smaller loads plus multiple distribution capability.
 
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Probably one of the biggest issues would be finding enough room in the outlet box to make connections. There isn't a lot of extra room in those boxes once the plug goes into it and a wire connector large enough to bond 2 #10 wires together might be hard to fit in it. They may be like that on purpose since it is supposed to be a dedicated outlet with only the dryer on it. What would be a better plan would be to run the wire to a subpanel. Some are designed so that you can take a direct load off it without going through another breaker but allowing other loads taken off of it that are going through breakers (as in 15 or 20 amp breakers). The main wire is already coming off a 30 amp breaker in your main panel so it's protected for the dryer load and the subpanel would allow proper protection for smaller loads plus multiple distribution capability.
Exactly!

This would actually be the best way of solving the problem. However, unless you know what you are doing and local codes allow you (the unlicensed homeowner) to do it, then it is best left up to a licensed electrician. Some localities allow non-licensed installation under certain circumstances, some are adamant that the installer be licensed and/or it may require a permit to install.

In the scheme of things a sub-panel allows you greater flexibility then just piggy backing the dryer circuit.
 

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It probably wouldn't be legal anywhere as I'm betting the code is that the dryer has to be on a dedicated circuit no matter where you are in Canada or the US. But it could be done safely the way I suggested. One of the major issues is that the code says that the wire runs have to be matched to the breaker capacity. A dryer requires a 30 amp breaker and you have to run #10 wire for that load (minimum). So no matter what you were running the wire to, even if it was only to a 100 watt light bulb, you would still have to run 10 gauge wire. Doing it yourself and doing it below code could void your insurance.

For anyone that wants power in their shop or garage I always recommend a sub panel. You run one wire from your main panel to it and then all the runs from it are much shorter and it's easy to run more circuits. Even if your main panel is on the other side of your garage wall there is still an advantage to having a sub panel because if you blow a breaker in the sub panel you don't have to go in the house to reset it. Also if you need to work on a machine the breaker is only a few feet away.
 

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Now what I would like to know is how to use a 120v tool in a country with 240v supply.

Tools outside of USA are waaay expensive but there are some nice DeWalt and Bosch power tools on EBay that I would love for my shop..I assume these motors are not able to be converted and need a complete motor change.
 

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Now what I would like to know is how to use a 120v tool in a country with 240v supply.

Tools outside of USA are waaay expensive but there are some nice DeWalt and Bosch power tools on EBay that I would love for my shop..I assume these motors are not able to be converted and need a complete motor change.
There was a string on this awhile back. The poster used a transformer to lower the voltage. The only problem might be a specialized tool or instrument that depends on 60 cycles when you run it on converted, 50 cycle power. This takes a pretty hefty transformer, but if you have several 110 v tools you can switch out, it might be worth doing. You might also find a used transformer at a decent price.
 

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Thanks everyone for the feedback on my question about using the 220 Dryer outlet. My dryer uses natural gas for heat, so that circuit goes unused. Better to hire an electrician, I think. I have no problem with 110 wiring, but I think you are all correct in not voiding your insurance. Great discussion.
 

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Thanks everyone for the feedback on my question about using the 220 Dryer outlet. My dryer uses natural gas for heat, so that circuit goes unused. Better to hire an electrician, I think. I have no problem with 110 wiring, but I think you are all correct in not voiding your insurance. Great discussion.
So, you have an existing, unused, 30amp dryer circuit. Sounds to me like you're well on your way to a sub-panel. An electrician can probably take care of this in no time at all.:smile:
 

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Thanks everyone for the feedback on my question about using the 220 Dryer outlet. My dryer uses natural gas for heat, so that circuit goes unused. Better to hire an electrician, I think. I have no problem with 110 wiring, but I think you are all correct in not voiding your insurance. Great discussion.
Where is the Dryer outlet? in the house or in the garage ?

How close is it to the main panel?

How close to where you wood work?

The electrician might just be able to disconnect it in the main panel . Then take out the 30a breaker and replace that with a 40a breaker. Then mount a sub panel on the surface of the garage with several 120v. breakers in it. You can then run as many 120v circuits as you need on the surface (use grey plastic conduit) for lights and outlets.
Just an option.

Herb
 

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I recall you saying in an insulation thread that the dryer was out in the garage so is that where the plug is too? 220 isn't complicated Tom. We could walk you through it. If the plug is in the garage then just mount the subpanel a few feet above it. You'll remove the plug, join wires, and then use a blank cover on the dryer receptacle box. You can use armored cable instead of conduit if you want but the PVC Herb mentioned is easy to work with too. Easy peasy and is code compliant.
 

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Where is the Dryer outlet? in the house or in the garage ?

How close is it to the main panel?

How close to where you wood work?

The electrician might just be able to disconnect it in the main panel . Then take out the 30a breaker and replace that with a 40a breaker. Then mount a sub panel on the surface of the garage with several 120v. breakers in it. You can then run as many 120v circuits as you need on the surface (use grey plastic conduit) for lights and outlets.
Just an option.

Herb
Hi Herb, The outlet is located in the garage, behind the dryer itself, about 60 ft from the main panel.
I like the idea of adding circuits (110 v) since all the tools out there are that voltage. And a sub panel out in the garage sounds like a good idea as well. I like 20 amp outlets and out in the shop, I have both breakers in the sub panel and CFGI 20 amp outlets, since the subpanel there is outdoors. The CFGI outlets then connect to some water proof flex cable (10 gauge) that go into a box inside the shed and then the three circuits run around the shop inside the walls.

I will have an electrician do it when the time comes. I don't want my insurance to be a problem, knock wood.

The only reason I thought about the 220 was if I won the lottery and bought a 8-12 inch jointer and a big commercial planer. But first, I have to buy a ticket.

Thanks for the suggestions all.
 

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I didn't watch the entire video (s), so it may have been mentioned, but did he say anything about "DISCHARGING" the capacitors????
 

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Yes, he did mention capacitor discharge in the first video.

However, he did not really give a good explanation of HOW to properly discharge them. As you know, some capacitors can store enough voltage to kill an elephant. These are not something to monkey with if you don't have any experience.
 
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Yes, he did mention capacitor discharge in the first video.

However, he did not really give a good explanation of HOW to properly discharge them...
He was basically shorting the capacitor with a screwdriver. That will work better than using body parts. I wouldn't use my best screwdriver for that, it may burn a mark on it.

In old TVs there was very high DC voltage required to attract the electrons from the back of the tube to the screen. That DC voltage was created as AC in the TV then rectified. The DC voltage coming out of a rectifier isn't smooth and a capacitor is used to filter (smooth) it. Because of the very high voltage a regular capacitor wasn't available or would be very costly. So they made one out of the picture tube itself by spraying a coating on the back of the tube (typically black, tarry looking). This large capacitor (the picture tube) could hold a very high voltage for a very long time after the TV was unplugged. To discharge that voltage a special tool was used, one end clipped to the chassis or ground and the other (well insulated) end was slipped under the rubber cap where the high voltage entered the tube. Inside that probe was a high value resistor which would slow down the discharging so you didn't get a mega-spark. We're talking tens of thousands of volts here! The ideal way to discharge a motor capacitor would probably use a resistor too but just shorting it with a screwdriver is much better than using your fingers!
 
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