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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello I am new to the Forum.
I been looking for a table router or just build one into my work table. So I found a Wolfcraft 540 table with Ryobi R160 router attached to it at a garage sale. Long story short I bought it for $14.00. Table is missing miter gauge and plastic cover for vacuum port. Other then that it all works in great shape. So my question is should I trash it and just go ahead with original plan or use what I got for $14.00 till whenever?
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My 2 cents is show us a picture. Assuming the table is flat and the router works I would use it. Eventually you will add on to it, make your own or buy a new combo. Welcome to the Router Forum
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My 2 cents is show us a picture. Assuming the table is flat and the router works I would use it. Eventually you will add on to it, make your own or buy a new combo. Welcome to the Router Forum
Here is a picture.
396850
Table Box
 

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Welcome to the forum. Seems that if the table will work for what you want/need to do use it but I'd plan on maybe building one if you find it to be a more often used tool. I built mine using the Crestonwood plans which are based on a Norm Abram's design and find it extremely useful and used quite often. Being a built cabinet style it's very sturdy and easily used for larger/longer pieces with excellent dust collection.
 

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It looks long enough to give you at least some stability. I would hold on to it and add a new fence and dust collection. You can get one from Rockler or Woodcraft that screws on and uses a shop vac. I would then build a bigger one but use the same fence. That way you can have two in case you ever need the second one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Welcome to the forum. Seems that if the table will work for what you want/need to do use it but I'd plan on maybe building one if you find it to be a more often used tool. I built mine using the Crestonwood plans which are based on a Norm Abram's design and find it extremely useful and used quite often. Being a built cabinet style it's very sturdy and easily used for larger/longer pieces with excellent dust collection.
Thank you. I will take the advise and use it for awhile, then upgrade in the future. Thank you very much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It looks long enough to give you at least some stability. I would hold on to it and add a new fence and dust collection. You can get one from Rockler or Woodcraft that screws on and uses a shop vac. I would then build a bigger one but use the same fence. That way you can have two in case you ever need the second one.
Yeah I planned on building a new fence. I definitely plan on building a larger one in the future. Thank you for the help and advise.
 

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Yeah I planned on building a new fence. I definitely plan on building a larger one in the future. Thank you for the help and advise.
When you build your new fence build it for your new table. Just make it able to work on the Wolfcraft table
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
When you build your new fence build it for your new table. Just make it able to work on the Wolfcraft table
I will use the original fence as my design, but make it as one and not 2 separate fences. I will combine the original with some ideas I have seen on this forum. Thank you for replying. Merry Christmas happy new year.
 

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I will use the original fence as my design, but make it as one and not 2 separate fences. I will combine the original with some ideas I have seen on this forum. Thank you for replying. Merry Christmas happy new year.
Sounds like a plan. Merry Christmas and thank God for a new year
 

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Welcome, and your decision to use it is a good choice. No one mentioned it, but my only concern would be how flat it is. You can use a straight edge (a level), lay it across the table and put a light behind it. Any light peeking through will show you how flat it is or isn't. If it's pretty flat, use the heck out of it. Building your own fence requires you be able to cut blocks or triangular pieces so you have perfect 90 degree angle braces to mount between the fence bottom and its face. You don't have to make the fence very elaborate, just square to the table top.

A split fence that lets you open the face up to fit the bit. Some are pretty wide. You have two vertical or front pieces, a solid backing with a cutout for the largest bit you might use (about 3 inches). You cut a groove in the back piece, and matching countersunk holes in the split pieces. This allows you to slide and tighten the split fence fast and easy. You can get star knobs a big box store to put on the threads on the back side of the first fence.

Cutting a groove in a piece of wood isn't terribly complicated to do. You put up a temporary flat fence (nice and straight 2x4 will do), measure the distance from fence to bit to place it where you want the groove, then carefully push the piece down onto the bit while holding it firmly against the temporary fence. You can mark the start and ending points on the temporary fence so the grooves match on each side. These grooves should be around 8 inches long on each side.

The drawing is of a fancy fence and you can see the triangular pieces. You have to place them so your groove will fit between the triangles with a little room for the star knob. Drill the holes in the split part very carefully so the split fence goes all the way to the table top. Clamp each split piece in place and mark or drill through the groove.

Making a fence like this is a really good exercise and you'll learn a lot. Make sure the wood you select is extremely flat and straight if you get it from a big box store. Often the concrete floor is flat enough so you can lay pieces out flat and on edge to see whether they're really flat, warped or twisted. I often go through most of the pieces in a bin to find a board or two that are really flat.

I'm assuming you have a table saw, and if you do, buy a Wixey Angle Gauge ($30) so you can make certain your cuts are at 90 degrees. Even a small error in cutting angle will make pieces sit funny. I am a fuss budget about cutting square.

I have a commercial fence because I bought most all my tools several years ago during my peak earning years. But what I miss is having what is called a tall fenced. Use some wider boards to make the split fence. I did make a tall fence for my table saw, much like the plan below. You can get a dustport from any of the woodworking stores online. Mine is Rockler because they're the only store withing driving range.

You will likely just use clamps to hold your fence down to the table. You can get quite fancy with details if you want, but this fence will do for many years.
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396934
396935
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Welcome, and your decision to use it is a good choice. No one mentioned it, but my only concern would be how flat it is. You can use a straight edge (a level), lay it across the table and put a light behind it. Any light peeking through will show you how flat it is or isn't. If it's pretty flat, use the heck out of it. Building your own fence requires you be able to cut blocks or triangular pieces so you have perfect 90 degree angle braces to mount between the fence bottom and its face. You don't have to make the fence very elaborate, just square to the table top.

A split fence that lets you open the face up to fit the bit. Some are pretty wide. You have two vertical or front pieces, a solid backing with a cutout for the largest bit you might use (about 3 inches). You cut a groove in the back piece, and matching countersunk holes in the split pieces. This allows you to slide and tighten the split fence fast and easy. You can get star knobs a big box store to put on the threads on the back side of the first fence.

Cutting a groove in a piece of wood isn't terribly complicated to do. You put up a temporary flat fence (nice and straight 2x4 will do), measure the distance from fence to bit to place it where you want the groove, then carefully push the piece down onto the bit while holding it firmly against the temporary fence. You can mark the start and ending points on the temporary fence so the grooves match on each side. These grooves should be around 8 inches long on each side.

The drawing is of a fancy fence and you can see the triangular pieces. You have to place them so your groove will fit between the triangles with a little room for the star knob. Drill the holes in the split part very carefully so the split fence goes all the way to the table top. Clamp each split piece in place and mark or drill through the groove.

Making a fence like this is a really good exercise and you'll learn a lot. Make sure the wood you select is extremely flat and straight if you get it from a big box store. Often the concrete floor is flat enough so you can lay pieces out flat and on edge to see whether they're really flat, warped or twisted. I often go through most of the pieces in a bin to find a board or two that are really flat.

I'm assuming you have a table saw, and if you do, buy a Wixey Angle Gauge ($30) so you can make certain your cuts are at 90 degrees. Even a small error in cutting angle will make pieces sit funny. I am a fuss budget about cutting square.

I have a commercial fence because I bought most all my tools several years ago during my peak earning years. But what I miss is having what is called a tall fenced. Use some wider boards to make the split fence. I did make a tall fence for my table saw, much like the plan below. You can get a dustport from any of the woodworking stores online. Mine is Rockler because they're the only store withing driving range.

You will likely just use clamps to hold your fence down to the table. You can get quite fancy with details if you want, but this fence will do for many years.
View attachment 396933 View attachment 396934 View attachment 396935
Thank you very much. I cannot wait to start getting back into doing some wood working. Slowly finding what I do not have by using forums, OfferUp and garage sales. I also need the time to heal from an accident, which is good because it’s giving me time on sketchup and a lot researching looking at plans that have been posted.
Thank you again and for the plan you have posted. Liking the design of the fence you posted.
 
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