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Discussion Starter #1
Guys ,if a wood base was used in a climate controlled shop (not mine obviously) ,
would it expand and contract enough to cause issues if it were used as a base for a cnc router table?
Obviously you want to maintain everything perfectly level when a cnc router table has been secured to its base , which made me wonder if wood would cause issues .
But if I was to buy a Pro cncrouterparts machine , I’d much prefer to build my own base , as it would be much heavier and sturdier than what they have to offer
 

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Generally, it shouldn't be a problem.
Wood moves very little along it's length (almost zero). Make sure it's sealed and painted well, and you shouldn't have any issues at all.
My router is almost 15 years old, and made entirely of wood, and is the same today as when I built it. It's in my garage, which gets down to freezing in the winter, and over 90F in the summer. I do heat it in the winter when I'll be working out there, but I don't keep it heated.

I'm building a new 4x8 machine which also will be almost entirely made of wood. I expect it to be as good or better than a CNCRP machine, with better performance.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Generally, it shouldn't be a problem.
Wood moves very little along it's length (almost zero). Make sure it's sealed and painted well, and you shouldn't have any issues at all.
My router is almost 15 years old, and made entirely of wood, and is the same today as when I built it. It's in my garage, which gets down to freezing in the winter, and over 90F in the summer. I do heat it in the winter when I'll be working out there, but I don't keep it heated.

I'm building a new 4x8 machine which also will be almost entirely made of wood. I expect it to be as good or better than a CNCRP machine, with better performance.
Pictures are always welcome :smile:
 

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Bring up the thread that 4D did when he built his stand. Simple, strong, practical, and cheap.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
I may not have worry about a stand , as I’m getting close to traveling to Alberta for the CAMaster.
I’ve just been having one hell of a time deciding what to do
 
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Rick I think the only problem you would have if the wood stand was well built would be if it is supported well. Like my shop is on steel runners and the land is old farmland so it is constantly moving with heavy rains or dry times. I have two torsion beams mounted on my stand and then my CNC is mounted to the beams. I check it now and then and make any adjustments needed to level everything back up using shims. I knew that it would be a problem and this was the best solution I could come up with. I just consider it part of my maintenance routine and it only takes 5 to 10 minutes to make adjustments.

I still hope to get a CNCRP machine and I'll probably use adjustable supports on the stand so I can make adjustments to when needed.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
Rick I think the only problem you would have if the wood stand was well built would be if it is supported well. Like my shop is on steel runners and the land is old farmland so it is constantly moving with heavy rains or dry times. I have two torsion beams mounted on my stand and then my CNC is mounted to the beams. I check it now and then and make any adjustments needed to level everything back up using shims. I knew that it would be a problem and this was the best solution I could come up with. I just consider it part of my maintenance routine and it only takes 5 to 10 minutes to make adjustments.

I still hope to get a CNCRP machine and I'll probably use adjustable supports on the stand so I can make adjustments to when needed.
I wasn’t aware you were a CNCRP fan to . I don’t think you can wrong with them from what I’ve read over the years . Many happy owners at CNCZone also .
I talked with Cory on the phone before and found them very helpful
 

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I wasn’t aware you were a CNCRP fan to . I don’t think you can wrong with them from what I’ve read over the years . Many happy owners at CNCZone also .
I talked with Cory on the phone before and found them very helpful
I've been looking at the 4x4 pro for a while now because I don't think my shop would handle a big heavy framed machine. The kit style of the CNCRP machines would work well and I could add some ballast weight to the stand to help dampen vibration but not so much that it would cause a problem. There are a lot of happy owners out there.

If I still had my old shop I would probably consider a welded steel framed machine because it could have supported on fine. It would have been nice to take that shop with me when I moved.
 
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CNCRP? OK, new one, so I looked it up. And you guys are really bonkers now. This is what I found.

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CNCRP stands for
Cebu North Coastal Road Project

I just hope all of you guys stay on your meds. :surprise:
 

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But that road leads to CNCRP, short for CNC Router Parts, which is now Avid CNC. See - it's simple.
 

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If it helps any, here is the stand I made for the new Comet (GX2525) from Probotix.com. The frame of the CNC is stiff enough that all needed to hold it up in the air is posts at each corner. If you have concerns about twisting of the frame then add adjuster feet to the posts.

Probotix themselves sell a base made from the same extrusions they make their CNCs from. To me the horizontal top members used look redundantly wasteful.
 

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CNCRP? OK, new one, so I looked it up. And you guys are really bonkers now. This is what I found.

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1
CNCRP stands for
Cebu North Coastal Road Project

I just hope all of you guys stay on your meds. :surprise:
What search engine are you using? I checked Google, Yahoo and Bing and never even saw "Cebu North Coastal Road Project". The number 1 on those 3 came up as cncrouterparts.com on my computer.
 

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Pictures are always welcome :smile:

The main "Frame" for my machine is a 7" thick 4x8 torsion box. The skins will be 1/2" baltic birch. The perimeter and 4' ribs will be 3/4" baltic birch.
All parts are CNC cut and dadoed, and the box will be assembled on a CNC vacuum table, to make sure its perfectly flat.


I build my legs using a rather labor intensive process, but it gives me very stable parts.
I start with standard 2x4 lumber, and re-saw it into 3 pcs roughly 7/16" x 3-1/2, then clean them up on the planer to get ±3/8" thickness.
Since construction lumber is a bit wet, I laminate them using Gorilla glue (or any polyurethane glue), which cures faster with moisture. I let them dry for a week or two, then mill them in to 2"x3" lumber. These are super stable, and very strong.


I'll be adding some baltic birch plates to the legs to stiffen everything up.
 

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That looks really strong, Gerry. Are you able to get BB in 4x8 sheets? All I can get locally is 5x5, of which I need to get two tomorrow.

Have you started construction on this machine? If so, we need photos! :grin:

David
 

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I've been building "prototype" parts for several years, but have redesigned numerous times, and won't be using a lot of the parts.
I have a long thread at CNC Zone with lots of pics.

I ordered the 4x8 baltic birch from Menards. It's special order. I'm hoping it arrives this week. If so, I'll be building the torsion box next weekend.
I cut the parts for the gantry beam years ago, but haven't assembled it yet.
I've already spent about $4000 on this, and still have another $1500-$2000 in parts I still need.

I'll do a build log thread here when I get started. I'm hoping that once I get the table built, I can really start making rapid process.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
The main "Frame" for my machine is a 7" thick 4x8 torsion box. The skins will be 1/2" baltic birch. The perimeter and 4' ribs will be 3/4" baltic birch.
All parts are CNC cut and dadoed, and the box will be assembled on a CNC vacuum table, to make sure its perfectly flat.


I build my legs using a rather labor intensive process, but it gives me very stable parts.
I start with standard 2x4 lumber, and re-saw it into 3 pcs roughly 7/16" x 3-1/2, then clean them up on the planer to get ±3/8" thickness.
Since construction lumber is a bit wet, I laminate them using Gorilla glue (I or any polyurethane glue), which cures faster with moisture. I let them dry for a week or two, then mill them in to 2"x3" lumber. These are super stable, and very strong.



I'll be adding some baltic birch plates to the legs to stiffen everything up.
That sounds very strong and stable indeed ,and much better than my idea of screwing two 2x4’s together
 

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Yeah, I wouldn't recommend just screwing construction lumber together. It needs to be sturdier, and have good diagonal bracing, so it can't wiggle itself apart over time.
 
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