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Used the above mix to fill small cracks where plywood meets Western Red Cedar on box lid (box is ready to have lid removed/cut off). Two hours later and nicely dried I start sanding& find the natural stain in the WRC dust/glue mix has bled into the ply wood. When attempting to remove the stain (sanding) I have to sand through the top layer of the plywood. Don't know what looks worse,think I'll have to cut the top off the box & rout a new rabbet to house the new plywood top. Anyone had this happen? I will post a pik or two soon,darn it.It's almost finished. Jamesjj777746
 

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try oxalic acid to lift the stain....
 

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I've used glue and dust before and have not been happy with it. You can't stain or really finish the work because of the glue and it doesn't match the wood so why bother? If I'm going to paint I use Durham wood putty. If I'm finishing the wood then I try to get a wood filler that matches. Nothing is perfect, but to me, glue and dust are just open of those tricks that sounds good but isn't really good.
 

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I fill with an Aussie product, Timber Mate, wich is available in a number of wood types to match your product. Work it in with your fingers, sand very lightly and it takes a finish just like the wood in your project. Available on Amazon. Best filler I've ever tried.
 

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Interesting. The times I have used glue and sawdust as filler, the piece was always painted, so made no difference. I have heard tho, that if you are going that route, crazy glue works very well.

The last time I used a store bought wood filler, I used it to make a custom pair of target grips for a revolver. Came out beautiful. Now if I could just remember how I did it, need target grips for another revolver.
 
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Mohawk makes some decent work well products...
 
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Sawdust mixed with shellac works great for small fills.
Jamie nailed it! I have long ago given up on the glue and sawdust. I use the the shellac and saw dust and it blends in perfectly with the shellac I finish the box with for sealer.

Glue and sawdust seemed to work back in the day before these modern glues. But these glues of today arn't compatible with the finishes that go on over them. I have also had success with clear poly and sawdust from the same wood I use to fill with. I save the sawdust from the wood I am cutting or sanding to fill with. Different wood dust will show up like a black eye.
Plywood is unforgiving to try and fill this way, unless you can find a sawdust that is nearly the same color finished like the plywood. Plywood sawdust has too much of the inner layers sawdust in it to be consistant.ly the same color as anything.
Bottom line is use the same substance as the sealer and it will blend in perfectly on solid woods. Plywood is a different story.
Herb
 

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Interesting. The times I have used glue and sawdust as filler, the piece was always painted, so made no difference. I have heard tho, that if you are going that route, crazy glue works very well.

The last time I used a store bought wood filler, I used it to make a custom pair of target grips for a revolver. Came out beautiful. Now if I could just remember how I did it, need target grips for another revolver.
Fimo is what you want.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fimo

Mould it, shape it by sticking it on a backing plate and squeezing tight so it is exactly as per your hand.
Bake it, and then final shaping and sanding.
I used it on a target pistol grip almost 30 years ago, It was still fine 10 years later when I sold the gun.
Course, its not a lot of good for filling gaps in woodwork. :surprise::laugh2:
 

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For nail holes, I have a collection of waxes in red, tan, black and white tones. Every time I use one of the variations of the tan or red waxes, I pull out a daub of the white and black. Since grains shift so much, I have to add a bit of black to one of the daubs of red or tan and a bit of black to another.

If I don't mind spending the extra time, I've ended up with floor to ceiling book shelves that I couldn't find any of the holes on.
 

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For nail holes, I have a collection of waxes in red, tan, black and white tones. Every time I use one of the variations of the tan or red waxes, I pull out a daub of the white and black. Since grains shift so much, I have to add a bit of black to one of the daubs of red or tan and a bit of black to another.

If I don't mind spending the extra time, I've ended up with floor to ceiling book shelves that I couldn't find any of the holes on.
Lee Valley used to sell a very small little chisel plane that you would use to peel a little curl of wood back and then you could put a nail in that spot and use their fish glue to glue the curl back down. The fish glue residue wipes off with water so it won't affect any finish. I didn't buy the chisel plane but I've done it a few times with just a chisel when I used a nail and wanted to hide it and it works beautifully. It really is all but invisible but it takes more time to do and your chisel has to be really sharp and you have to be careful to only curl the wood back a little and not slice it off.
 

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Jamie nailed it! I have long ago given up on the glue and sawdust. I use the the shellac and saw dust and it blends in perfectly with the shellac I finish the box with for sealer.

Glue and sawdust seemed to work back in the day before these modern glues. But these glues of today arn't compatible with the finishes that go on over them. I have also had success with clear poly and sawdust from the same wood I use to fill with. I save the sawdust from the wood I am cutting or sanding to fill with. Different wood dust will show up like a black eye.
Plywood is unforgiving to try and fill this way, unless you can find a sawdust that is nearly the same color finished like the plywood. Plywood sawdust has too much of the inner layers sawdust in it to be consistant.ly the same color as anything.
Bottom line is use the same substance as the sealer and it will blend in perfectly on solid woods. Plywood is a different story.
Herb
Duh - why didn’t I think of this? Obvious answer...
 

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Lee Valley used to sell a very small little chisel plane that you would use to peel a little curl of wood back and then you could put a nail in that spot and use their fish glue to glue the curl back down. The fish glue residue wipes off with water so it won't affect any finish. I didn't buy the chisel plane but I've done it a few times with just a chisel when I used a nail and wanted to hide it and it works beautifully. It really is all but invisible but it takes more time to do and your chisel has to be really sharp and you have to be careful to only curl the wood back a little and not slice it off.
I have seen those , Chuck, never used that method, but always thought it was a clever method. I have it filed away for future use. I don't nail things together much any more, if I use a fastener it is a screw, then I use wooden plugs made from the same material and they make a nice feature. I have had many non woodworkers compliment them and think the pieces are doweled together I just shrug and don't tell them. But when I was working doing high end woodwork in attorneys and CEO's offices that was the accepted solution by architects.
Herb
 

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Lee Valley used to sell a very small little chisel plane that you would use to peel a little curl of wood back and then you could put a nail in that spot and use their fish glue to glue the curl back down. The fish glue residue wipes off with water so it won't affect any finish. I didn't buy the chisel plane but I've done it a few times with just a chisel when I used a nail and wanted to hide it and it works beautifully. It really is all but invisible but it takes more time to do and your chisel has to be really sharp and you have to be careful to only curl the wood back a little and not slice it off.
Chuck
that's what I was told to use a gouge for about 60 yrs ago
 
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