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Discussion Starter #1
Is there a way to limit wood moving while ripping on the table saw? I have this problem a lot and it causes burning. I then have to joint it to remove the burn marks. This time I was ripping walnut a few days after I ran it through the thickness planer. Before that the wood had been in the shop for 6 to 8 months.

Thanks.
 

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Don; moving how? You mean away from the fence?
Possible contributors:
-wrong blade...too fine/too many teeth (see the thread on sawblades)
- fence not parallel to the blade (plus a couple of thou extra at the outfeed end)
-no riving knife or splitter in place?
-no featherboards on the infeed side of the blade (holding the stock against the fence)
-the material has built in tension, and it's released during the cut
-the fence moves?
-blade needs cleaning/sharpening?

Not suggesting that you haven't considered all of the above, Don, but those are just a list of the most common factors. Guessing that the list will be added to/corrected shortly. :)
If it were me, I'd be taking a long hard look at my blade; this kind of sneaks up on you over time. I'd be using my circ saw for months, then I'd get frustrated because it seemed that the saw would start pulling to the right on a rip cut. I'd put on a new blade and like magic the problem would go away and the saw would cut like a hot knife through butter. *embarrassment*
 

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This may be caused by what they call "reaction wood." That is wood that does not grow vertically where the internal stresses are balanced. On a large heavy limb, the cellular structure is not the same as a result of the weight and imbalance. When this wood is cut the stresses are altered or released and movement can occur. When I was fairly new to a table saw, I had a piece of pine 1X8 that I was ripping. I noticed it curving inward and pinching the splitter. Unaware of the danger, I kept pushing and at some point it split the rest of the way to the end of the board with an accompanying loud crack. Fortunately, the "kerf" opened up and I did not get a kickback but both halves were anything but straight.
 

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I'd lean towards fence/blade alignment for starters....

as an aside: Not long ago, I was cutting some 1" thick walnut...not a big piece, maybe 30"s long or so and 3-4 inches wide or there abouts...
The saw kerf (1/8") was no more than 4 inches behind the blade and that piece of wood closed up so fast and so tight that it actually stalled the motor..
Deeeeeeeeeeeeeeee AMN says I!!!!
I tried another cut, coming at it from the opposite direction, same exact thing....
You don't wanna know what I said!!!
I've cut plenty of knarry wood over the years, but I've never seen
anything like that....
 

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I have the Boardmate ripping aid - it creates down force to hold stock against table, plus side force to hold stock against the fence and the wheels only turn on one direction to prevent kick back.
(Only pic I have without running out to the shop and taking another)
I got it from Peach Tree here Board Mates
router_insert.jpg
 

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All good suggestions above. I'll add that you just don't want to experience kickback, so definitely tune that saw, adjust blade height properly depending on the blade, use a splitter and featherboards as well as a feed board tacked onto the subject board. . I've personally found that if there is a tough ripping job, I'd prefer the bandsaw to the tablesaw.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Guys I have been tuning my saw this mourning. It was very close but now it's better. I am glad about that. I also cleaned the blade the blade which I do often and I also waxed the table. I haven't cut anything yet but it want be long.

Thanks;
 

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Don; you won't be absolutely sure until you swap the blade out for a freshly sharpened one. Somethings just need to be tried to confirm a theory.
Keep in mind that you can pop an 8 1/4" blade on your 10" saw. Obviously not as deep a cut but it might be a big help in ripping 4/4 lumber(?).
I suggest that because a thin kerf 24 tooth blade is cheap like borscht. Worth trying?
 

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Hello!

When it happens that i use sliced tree planks I did
always use a portable circular saw to cut a first approach.
And never had problems.
Regards
Gérard
 

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Hey, Gerard; always good to hear from you! :)
Thanks Dan, i also like to read your words here.
Away from home, with a poor gsm internet , i spend less time here...
But reading some of new threads here every day.

About splitting wood, circular portable saw didn’t cause me any problems.
No rail, just following the line.with 1/2" margins.

One friend of mine is using a top rail guiding system that holds the weight of some kind of portable saw
(this machine was made on purpose for that kind of job).
If the wood is binding it does not push on any guide , so it cuts straight.(somehow..)


Regards
 
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