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I depends on what finish you want. Clear finish-what ever wood you like.
Stained, Oak, Alder, Birch, Beech, Ash,Maple (stains blotchy) etc.
If you like knots, Pine.
Paint, Alder,Birch,Maple, any tight grained wood.

There are a lot of "depends" here.
Herb
 

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I think the suggestion of poplar if you want solid wood is a good idea. Of what I’ve read about Shaker furniture pine and cherry were mentioned quite a bit if authenticity is a factor.
 

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I forgot Poplar.
I have gotten away from Poplar and use more Red Alder now. I love the way Alder machines, stains and finishes clear.. Poplar seems to be tough and leaves fuzz on the cuts, where as the alder is nice and crisp and cuts clean and smooth. The price is about the same. We have lots of Alder locally, most goes for firewood. I cannot even count the big clear alder trees that I fell and cut for firewood. Now with the burn bans state wide where it almost takes an act of the legislature to start a fire of any kind I see more Alder showing up at the lumber Store. Or maybe they are running out of poplar.
Herb
 

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Now I’ll really blow your mind talking about poplar. According to my wood supplier, poplar from the south east United States is a member of the tulip wood family, where in the upper Midwest poplar is in the cotton wood family. Supposably the tulip wood poplar machines better and has less tendency for frizzing.

Now I’m not into forestry so don’t take me out to the tool shed to spank me if I’m ill informed, just what I was told by someone trying to sell me something.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
 

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The poplar out here is white poplar that is indeed related to the cottonwood tree but the woods don’t resemble each other much. I know that some of the poplar back east is yellow poplar and that might be the one you are referring to.
 

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Stuart,

Your post is missing some details. Are you doing a single cabinet door or a complete kitchen or ...
If you are painting the final product and budget is a factor, then MDF is the least expensive way to go. If you prefer solid wood, then the cheapest is Pine. You can paint Pine but try to use your material by removing the knots, as they are difficult to hide and could eventually fall out.

Dan
 

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Stuart,

Your post is missing some details. Are you doing a single cabinet door or a complete kitchen or ...
If you are painting the final product and budget is a factor, then MDF is the least expensive way to go. If you prefer solid wood, then the cheapest is Pine. You can paint Pine but try to use your material by removing the knots, as they are difficult to hide and could eventually fall out.

Dan
I believe the OP indicated he wanted cheap and "paintable" in his post, but seems some respondents have missed that aspect. That's why I suggested MDF early on. As I said, machines easily and takes paint very well.
 

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I believe the OP indicated he wanted cheap and "paintable" in his post, but seems some respondents have missed that aspect. That's why I suggested MDF early on. As I said, machines easily and takes paint very well.
You are right ,Vince, I just re-read the OP and for some reason I thought that painting was one option.

I can't vouch for MDF as never ,ever, use that product.
Herb
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
First off sorry (thank you Vince)
I want to try making a door and if it works out ok I would do all the cupboard doors.
And if I do all of them it will be to save money but I want them to turn out nice.
 

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First off sorry (thank you Vince)
I want to try making a door and if it works out ok I would do all the cupboard doors.
And if I do all of them it will be to save money but I want them to turn out nice.
Vince as I understand it MDF dulls the router bits
Stuart - yes, I agree with you and Stick - MDF may dull router bits, but, I'm not using them in a production shop on a daily basis. I have made several kitchens with MDF doors, rail and stile. Haven't had a problem in limited use. If you're concerned about MDF working or not, please check out this thread. I made a set of kitchen cabinets for my daughter, and replaced other existing doors using the same methods. Used 3/4" MDF for the rails/stiles and 1/4" MDF for the panels. Two coats of primer and one coat of paint, sprayed on with sanding in between coats. I think they came out looking good. My daughter and I were happy with the results. It's a fairly long thread, but just scroll through the pictures in that post for something to think about.

http://www.routerforums.com/show-n-tell/122650-golfs-over-im-back-new-project.html#post1713522
 
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