Router Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I build wooden clocks. I cut the gears out with a scroll saw. Because of the repititious nature of the gear teeth valleys I've been trying to figure out how to do that on my router. I built a jig similar to one I use for finger joints to get the spacing correct and that seems to work ok. I just haven't found the correct bit to use. I've also done it on a table saw but the valleys are then just straight without any slope to them. Sure would like to find a way to do it on the router. Maybe one of you geniuses have done this and would be willing to help me out.

Dave from Bouse :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,702 Posts
Davewillen said:
I build wooden clocks. I cut the gears out with a scroll saw. Because of the repititious nature of the gear teeth valleys I've been trying to figure out how to do that on my router. I built a jig similar to one I use for finger joints to get the spacing correct and that seems to work ok. I just haven't found the correct bit to use. I've also done it on a table saw but the valleys are then just straight without any slope to them. Sure would like to find a way to do it on the router. Maybe one of you geniuses have done this and would be willing to help me out.

Dave from Bouse :cool:
Did you ever solve your problem and figure out how to do the gears?

Ed
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
666 Posts
Davewillen said:
I build wooden clocks. I cut the gears out with a scroll saw. Because of the repititious nature of the gear teeth valleys I've been trying to figure out how to do that on my router. I built a jig similar to one I use for finger joints to get the spacing correct and that seems to work ok. I just haven't found the correct bit to use. I've also done it on a table saw but the valleys are then just straight without any slope to them. Sure would like to find a way to do it on the router. Maybe one of you geniuses have done this and would be willing to help me out.

Dave from Bouse :cool:
This is something I have never done with the router but the challenge is there for someone and maybe one day I will get round to trying it. One thing is clear you will need to work with a small template guide and a small cutter. One of the problems would be making a number of templates to suit the various sizes of teeth, and setting up a means of rotating the blank and positioning. The list just goes on and on
Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
My working life has been 30 years as a tool maker making dies for aluminium extrusions.
I worked on mills for most of the time and have sometimes used small engineering milling cutters in my router.
The 3 flute spiral milling cutters cut wood beautifully and clear the swarf easily.
The standard cutters for die milling have 4 flutes and a 3/8" shank with a 3° or 5° angle.
The cutters are measured by the tip diameter with the smallest being 3/32" and the normal sizes being 1/8", 5/32" and 3/16".
The shortest cutters have a 3/4" cutting length but it may be possible to use such cutters to produce gears with a 3 or 5 degree edge.
A 3/8" collet would be needed.
With only a 1/4" router I have only used 1/4" cutters for making a slot in bread board edges.
Set in a table with a feather board these milling cutters make short work of that job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Hi Dave

I know this is a old post but if you didn't find a router bit to use give this one a try, it's a great bit and you can use in a small router or a trim router.

WhiteSide Carving Liner Bit
SC50 and the BCR062 bit
http://woodworkersworld.net/carving_liner_router_bit_bits.shtml

It's the same type of bit that Sears is now using in their new computer carving machine that sells for 1900.oo dollars and runs CarveWright software and looks like a 14" planer or to say a CNC machine.
If you have the bucks the new Sears machine will cut your clock parts out quick and easy. :)

Craftsman CompuCarve Compact Woodworking Machine, Computer-Controlled

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/prod...rs,+Planers+&+Shapers&vertical=TOOL&ihtoken=1

To see a demo video of this great machine, see link below ▼
http://www.carvewright.com/

This is now on my wish list and I'm going to get one as soon as I rob bank :)
just kidding but I'm going to get one.
The real neat thing about this tool I don't need to have the computer in the shop, just need to but the items I want to make on a memory card then just put it in the machine.
And with Opt. Scanning Probe (299.oo item) I can copy anything that's fits in the machine and put it on the memory card so I can make as many copies as I need to or resize them on the PC.

Dave ,like parts for a wooden clock :)

Just a NOTE**** you can download the software to have a look see BUT it's a big file 63mb. but the the machine comes with a cd for the software install.




Bj :)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I saw the carve wright machine at Sears and also read a lot of the reviews on line on the factory forum. It seems there are a number of issues, including the flexible shaft. Does anyone have one of these machines and how well it is working. I am ready t orob the bank, but do not have the patience to help work out the bugs. BTW, Sears had it on sale for about $200 off
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
595 Posts
I've seen this at Sears, and it looks great. However, doesn't it taken something away from the project if it's made by a machine. It's doing all the work for you, all you have do is glue the parts together. I'm not a wood carver, but this may be going to far. Don't get me wrong if I could get one I would. I'd like to think of myself as a purist.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
312 Posts
tbohacek said:
I saw the carve wright machine at Sears and also read a lot of the reviews on line on the factory forum. It seems there are a number of issues, including the flexible shaft. Does anyone have one of these machines and how well it is working. I am ready t orob the bank, but do not have the patience to help work out the bugs. BTW, Sears had it on sale for about $200 off
I've had one for a couple of weeks and couldn't be happier with it (personal use only, I have no affiliation with LHR Technologies, Inc.). There can be a learning curve to getting the software (which is really powerful but slightly limited in what you can import) to do what you want but it depends on the applications you have in mind. I intend to cut some clock gears with it soon. The machine itself seems very well built and aside from a few glitches on the first machines (like the grease on the flex shaft) it looks like they have the bugs pretty well worked out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Hi Charles

Did you get the Scanning Probe also ???? if so what did you think about it ??? can it copy any thing and put it on the memory chip so you make a copy or resize on the computer, I read somewhere it can take up to 8 hours of running time to make a item, is this true ?, how do they get the chips out of the way at run time ?,I do see a small vac port but it's small port with a filter on it I think.

Sorry I have tons of questions , I'm thinking of getting one also....but been holding back a bit after reading the posted items on forums at CraveWright site.


Bj :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
312 Posts
Bj,

The scanning probe is on my wish list but haven't gotten one yet. There is a thread right now on the CarveWright forum talking about the capabilities and limitations, particularly how it performs on delicate items. The scans that I have seen done by others look great.

I also saw the negative comments on their forum regarding the machine but I have learned through a lot of time on the net how to filter out the noise and get to the meat. I'm happy that I purchased one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Thanks Charles for the feed back

I have been wanting to make this in wood for years ( see below) and now It looks like I can with this new tool :)

Bj :)
 

Attachments

1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top